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Full text of "73 Magazine (October 1988)"







international Edition 



OCTOBER 1988 

ISSUE ^337 

USA $2.95 

CAN $3.95 

A yVGE Publication 



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11^ E?^d Microwave: 
ck It Out: 



elector ivioun 
Microwave Ham 
Overview 




aie OT I wo 33 cm 
Transverters 
Downeast 1.2 GHz 
Loop Yagi 

lus: 

Cheap and Easy 
Video Packet 
WEFAX on the PC 



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^748a0' 08725 'h 



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IC-761 HFJranscfivdr 




1 9N CiMdi/RSSR Tram Polor Ski Trak 





"For more th^ three months^ under Itie most exacting 
comtittons, the loom equlptiwnt pefformed superbly In 
supfx^rt of the Polar BHdge Expeditlon> . , loom equipment 
was our first choice." 

- Barry Garratt VE0CDX/VE»CDXi4K{)DX, QhM O^snLXwlHfxth Pole 28 
19§A Canada-USSR Trans Ptriar Ski Trak 






The Canada/USSR Trans Polar SM 
Trek did not include leeway for second 
best. That's why they chose Icom's lC-761 
HF transceiver. With amateur radio as the sole 
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THE COMPLETE HF TRAHSCHVER! 

Includes: •Built-in AC power supply 
•Automatic antenna tuner •105dB 
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noise • lOOW output on most modes 



•100% duty cycle •High stability crystal 
oscillator •Self -calibrating SWR bndge 
•Multiple filter selection •Dial or front 
keypad frequency selection *32 memories 
•All bands, all modes with general coverage 
receiver •Passband tuning •IF shift 
•Built-in iambic keyer •Semi or full QSK 
rated at 60WPM .Built-in wide/narrow 
SSB and C W filters. 

lEST IH REUABIUTY! 

Field proven top performance backed by a 
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ICOM 

First in Communications 

COM Aminfe, Inc., 2380-1 ieth Ave. N.E, Bellevue, WA 98004 
Customs Service Hotline (206) 454^7619 

3150 Premier Drive, Suite 126, Irving, IX 75063 / 1777 Phoenix 

Parkway, Suite 201, Atiafrta, GA 30349 

ICOM CANADA, A Division of ICOM Atnerica, Inc., 

3071 - tIS ftoast Unrt 9, Rk;hmond, B.C. V6X 2T4 Canada 

AN stated specMications ai^ subject to change witk>ui notice or oblt^an. Al 
\COU radios sjignificantty exc«d FCC riegutaJions \\m^ng sp^jrjoiis 
emissions. 761686 

CIRCLE 354 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



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THE ALL NEW PRIVATE PATCH IV BY CSI HAS MORE 
COMMUNICATIONS POWER THAN EVER BEFORE 



NEW 



• Initiate phone calls from your HT or mobile 

• Receive incoming phone calls 
f • Telephone initiated control . . . 

^ Operate your base station with complete control from any telephone 
^ Change frequencies from the controlling telephone 
t^ Selectively call mobiles using regenerated DTMF from any telephone 
1^ Eavesdrop the channel from any telephone 
i^ Use as a wire remote using ordinary dial up lines and a 
speaker phone as a control head. 









DIAL ACCESS REMOTE/lNTERCOMNiCT 

DTMF COS CON Ql«i- 


Private Patch IV 





The new telephone initiated control 
capabilities are awesome. Imagine 
having full use and full control of 
your base station radio operating 
straight simplex or through any re- 
peater from any telephone! From 
your desk at the office, from a pay 
phone, from a hotel room, etc. You 
can even change the operating 
channel from the touchpadl 

Our digital VOX processor flips your 
conversation back and forth fully 
automatically. There are no buttons 
to press as in phone remote 
devices. And you are in full control 
IOOV0 of the time! 

The new digital dial tone detector 
will automat rcaHy disconnect Pri- 
vate Patch IV if you forget to send # 
(to remotely disconnect) before 
hanging up. This powerful feature 
will prevent embarassing lock-ups. 

The importance of telephone in- 
itiated control for emergency or 
disaster communications cannot be 
overstated* Private Patch IV gives 
you full use of the radio system from 
any telephone. And of course you 
have full use of the telephone 
system from any mobile or HT! 

To get the complete story on the 
powerful new Private Patch IV con- 
tact your dealer or CSI to receive 
your free four page brochure. 

Private Patch IV will be your most 
important investment in commun- 
ications. 



^ = NEW FEATURE 

^ */# or multtHdigit connect/discon- 
nect 
t^ FuKy regenerated tone dialing 

• Pulse dialing 

• Toll protection 

• Secret toll override code 

• Busy signal disconnect 
i^ Dialtone disconnect 

• CW identification 

• Activity timer 

• Timeout timer 

^^ Telephone initiated control 

Regenerated DTMF selective calling 

Ringout 

Ringout or Auto Answer on 1-8 rings 

Busy channel ringout inhibit 

Status messages 

Internally squelched audio 

MOV lightning protection 

Front panel status led's 

Separate CW ID level control 

i^ 24 diD switches make all features 
user programmable/selectable. 






1.^ 



Connects to MIC and ext, 
speaker jack on any radio. Or 

connect internally if desired. 

Can be connected to any HT. 
(Even those with a two wire inter- 
face.) 

Can be operated simplex, 
through a repeater from a base 
station or connected directly to 
a repeater for semi-duplex opera* 
tion, 

20 minutes typical connect time 

Made in U.S.A. 



OPTIONS 

1. Vi second electronic voice delay 

2. FCC registered coupler 

3. CW ID chip 




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MFJ 3 KW Roller Inductor Tuner 

. . . lets you get your SWR down to absolute minimum — something a 
tapped inductor tuner just can*t do . . . 

. . . plus you get a peak reading Cross-Needle SWR/Wattmeter. 6-position 
antenna switch, balun for balanced lines and 1.8-30 MHz coverage... $239. 95 








MFJ*s innovative new DifTerential-T 
Tuner^"! uses a diilerenUal capacitor that 
makes tuning foolproof and easier than 
ever. It ends constant re- tuning with 
broadband coverage and gives you 
minimum SWR at only one setting. 

The new MFJ-986 is a rugged no- 
compromise 3 KW PEP Roller Inductor 
antenna tuner that covers L8-30 MHz 
continuously, including MARS and all the 
WARC bands. The roller inductor lets 
you tune your SWR down to the 
absolute miitimum - something a 
tapped inductor tuner just can't do. 

A 3'digit turns counter plus a spinner 
knob gives you precise inductance 
control - so you can quickly return to 
your favorite frequency. 

You get a lighted Cross-Needle meter 
that not only gives you SWR, forward 
and reflected power at a glance - but also 
gives you a peak-reading function! A 
new directional coupler gives you even 
more accurate readings over a wider 
frequency range. 

You get a 6-position ceramic antenna 
switch that lets you select two coax lines 
and/or random wires (direct or through 
tuner), balanced Une and external 
dummy load* 

A new current balun for balanced 
lines minimises feedhne radiation that 
causes field pattern distortion, TV! and 
RF in your shack. Ceramic feedthru 
insulators for balanced lines withstand 
high voltages and temperatures. 

New Antenna Tuner Technology 

MFJ brings you three innovation b in 

antenna tuner technology: a new 
Differeniiat-T^^ circuit simplifies tuning: 
a new directional coupler gives you more 
accurate SWR, forward and reflected 
power readings; and a new current bafun 
reduces feedline radiation. 

Differential-T Tuner*^: 
A New Twist on a Proven Technology 

By replacing the two variable 
capacitors with a single differential 
capacitor you get a w^ldc range 
T-network tuner with only two 
controls - the differential capacitor and 
a roller inductor. 

That's how you get the new MFJ 
DlfTerential-T Tuner^m that makes tuning 
easier than ever, gives you minimum 
SWR at only one setting and has a 
broadband response that ends constant 
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instead of fooling with your tuner. 

The compact 10¥4 x ^Vi x 15 inch 
cabinet has plenty of room to mount the 
silver-plated roller inductor away from 
metal surfaces for maximum Q -- you get 
high efficiency and more power into your 
antenna- 

The wide spaced air gap differential 
transmitting capacitor lets you run a full 
3 KW PEP -no worries about arcing. 

A New Directional Coupler: 
Accurate SWR and Power Reading 

MFJ's Cross-Needle SWRAVattmeter 
gives you more accurate SWR and power 
readings over a wider frequency range 
with no frequency sensitive adjustments. 

That's because MFJ's new directional 
coupler gives you up to an order of 
magnitude higher directivity and 
coupling factor than conventional circuits 
. . . plus it gives you a flat frequency 
response that requires no frequency 
compensation. 

The cross- nee die meter lets you read 
forward/ reflec led power in 2 ranges; 
200/50 and 2000/500 watts. The meter 
lamp Is front- panel switched arid requires 
12 volts, 

A switch lets you select peak or 
average power readings. 

A New Current Balun: 
Reduces Feedline Radiation 

Nearly all commercially built tuners 
use a "voltage" balun. The 'Voltage" 
balun forces the voltages to be equal on 
the two antenna halves. It minimizes 
unbalanced currents only if the antenna 
Is perfectly balanced -not the case with 
practical antennas. 

The MFJ-986 uses a true current 
balun to force equal currents into the 
two antenna halves - even if your 
antenna is not perfectly balanced — so 
you get minimum unbalanced currents. 

The current balun gives superior 
balance over the "Voltage" balun. 

Minimum unbalanced current reduces 
field pattern distortion -- which 
concentrates your power for a stronger 




MFJ-986 

239 



95 



signal - plus it reduces TVI and RF In 
your shack caused by feedline radiation. 

The MFJ'986 Differential-T Tunertm: 
Get absolute minitnum SWR 

Get the tuner that Incorporates the 
latest innovations by the world's leader 
in antenna tuner technology.' 

See your dealer today for the new 
MFJ-986 Differential-T^'Ti 3 kW Roller 
Inductor Tuner. Include $10 
shipping/ hand ling if ordering direct. 



WHY CHOOSE AN MFJ TUNER? 

Hard-earned Reptitatlon; There's 
just no shortcut. MFJ is a name you can 
trust - more hams trust MFJ tuners 
throughout the world than all other 
tuners combined. 

Proven Re li ability: MFJ has made 
more tuners for more years than 
anyone else - with MFJ tuners you get a 
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First-rate Performance: MFJ tuners 
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Tour very best value; MFJ tuners 
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Choose your MFJ tuner with 
confidence! You're getting proven 
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most trusted name In antenna tuners. 
Don't settle for less. 

Call or write for Sifree full-line MFJ 
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FOR YOUR NEAREST DEALER 
or to order call toll free 

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One Year Unconditional Guarantee 

MFJ , , * making quality ciffordable circle a4 on reader service card 



MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC, 

Box 494, Miss, State, MS 39762 
601-323-5869 Telex: 53^4590 MFJSTKV 



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Number 1 on your Feedback card 



Welcome, Newcomers! 



What's "Hot" About Microwaves 

Microwaves first awed us (and made some 
of us very suspicious) with their ability to brew 
up a piping hot cup of coffee in 30 seconds, or 
cook a meal in 3 minutes. Now, we hear more 
about communications associated WEth mi- 
crowaves. Telephone companies routinely 
use microwave relays, and many television 
studfos transfer their programming to the 
broadcast site via microwave links. The prolif- 
eration of satellite dishes in residential back 
yards and on homes attest to the immense 
popularity of satellite TV, in which signals on 
the microwave bands are uplinked to, and 
downlinked from, sateUltes orbiting the 
equator. 

Do the same waves both cook and can7 
communications? — most certainty] Further- 
more, microwaves are part of the electromag- 
netic wave spectrum, which contains waves 
of immensely varying properties, such as X- 
rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infra-red, 
and those that carry AM and FM broadcast 
signals, among others. The form of these 
waves, however, are exactly the same— they 
differ only in frequency. 

More and more hams are taking an interest 
in microwave operation- Why this is just a 
recent phenomenon, and their vast potential, 
is the thrust of this month's column. 

Long Known About 

It's a little known fact that microwave com- 
munications has existed since the very early 
days of radio investigation. Gugtielmo Mar- 
coni, the father of wireless radio, made his first 
major contribution to communications tech- 
nology in 1897 by sending a microwave signal 
that was received several miles distant J As 
early as 1933, a commercial microwave link 
was set up across the English channel, which 
operated for many years. 

Why haven't hams, however, really ven- 
tured into these bands until recently? For a 
combination of reasons: 

• LIne-of-sight propagation. Except during 
highly unusual weather conditions, micro- 
waves travel in a straight line. Waves of much 
lower frequencies, generally those below 30 
MHz, usually travel to the ionosphere, which 
refracts them back to Earth to points many 
miles away. 

• Specialized components. Only very precise 
(and expensive) components could cleanly 
generate such high frequencies. 

• High attenuation. Microwave energy is 
much more absorbed by organic matter than 
waves of lower frequencies. Even moisture 
greatly absorbs microwave energy at certain 
frequencies in the higher end of the mi- 
crowave subspectrum. It's this property that 
makes microwaves ideal for cooking! 

Much has changed, however. Commercial 
Interests have been developing microwave 
communication systems in earnest in the past 

4 73 Amateur Radio * October, 1988 



20 years, which has increased the supply, and 
driven down the cost, of microwave compo- 
nents. Transponder-equipped satellites for 
many communication services, including am- 
ateur radio, now orbit the Earth, They greatly 
increase the range of line-of-sight signals, and 
reduce the attenuation problem, since these 
signals do not encounter trees, mountains, 
and other energy-absorbing obstacles on their 
way to and from the satellite. 

And what do these bands have in their fa- 
vor? First and foremost is the vast amount of 
bandspace there is in the microwave region — 
one ham band alone contains almost as much 
bandspace as ail the ham bands below it com- 
bined!^ This permits much wideband opera- 
tion, which is desirable since, the wider the 
signal, the more quickly It can convey informa- 
tion. There are many modes of operation, loo, 
that hams can investigate in the microwave 
regions, which can't be in the lower frequency 
regions due to the relatively narrow band allo- 
cations there. A secondary reason is that mi- 



crowave antennas do not need to be as large 
as those needed for fower frequency signals, 
for comparabte gain. These antennas, too, 
are easily made to be extremely directive, 
which helps reduce unnecessary interfer- 
ence. 

Microwaves offer a unique opportunity for 
hams to explore new techniques and opera- 
tion methods — and more cheaply than ever 
before. Come and explore this frontier!!^ 

deNSIB 

^ Marconi's best-knowr} contributior} to radio 
communications is ttie first transoceanic wire- 
less transmission, fn December 1901, Mar- 
coni sent the letter "S" from a site near St. 
John's Newfoundland, which was received in 
Potdhu, Cornwait. 

^ ne 3 cm (10- 10.500 GHz) band is 500 MHz 
wide. All the amateur bands below 3 cm tot 60 
meters total up to less than 510 MHz of 
bandspace. 



^^^^^^^^^^^R^^^^^^^^ 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m 



GLOSSARY 



Attenuation— Dampening, reduction, 

Band"-A group of frequencies. 

Downlink— A signal that is sent from a satellite to an Earth-based station. 

Electromagnetic wave spectrum— This represents the entire range of frequencies or 
wavelengths of electromagnetic energy. Radio waves typically range from 20.000 
cycies/second to 300,000 million cyctes/second. The microwave portion of the spec- 
trum is typically set at 1 ,000-300,000 cycles/seeonci. 

Frequency — One of the two terms that characterizes electromagnetic waves. It is the 
number of cycles of a wave that passes a given point in a given period of time. {A wave 
cycle is the portion of the wave from one peak to the next.) The frequency is usually 
gsven In meters per second, commonly termed Hertz (Hz). 

Gain— Describes the increase of voltage, current, or power. Gain is a ratio. A given 
transmitting antenna's gain, forexampfe, is the strength of Jts radiated signals com- 
pared to the strength of the radiated signals of a reference antenna- Gain is usually 
represented in logarithmic units called decibels (dB). 

Ham— Short for amateur radio operator, 

MHz— Abbreviation for megahertz. This stands for ''millions of cycles per second/' 

Mode — Mode has several meanings. In this case, it refers to the way information is 
imposed on a radio wave. AM and FM are two modes. 

Propagation— This refers to the iraveHing of radio waves through a given medium^ such 
as the atmosphere. The better the propagation, the further this energy travels through 
the medium. 

Transponder— The unit on a satellite that receives a signal from Earth and simyltaneous- 
ly retransmits ft back to Earth, on a frequency distant from the receive frequency. 

Uplink — A Sfgnal that is sent from an Earth-based station to a communications satellite. 

Wavelength— One of the two principal characterizations of an eiectromagnelic wave. The 
wavelength is conventionally measured from one wave peak to the next. This distance is 
usually given in meters or centimeters. 

Wideband— R^fefgta as that occupies a relatively brdj^d piece of spectrum. An AM 
broadcast signal, for example, takes up 6,000-6,000 cycles of bandspace, and so is not 
considered very wideband. The signal that carries the combined audio and color video 
to your TV set however, occupies 6 million cycles of bandspace, making it wideband. 



QRM 

editorial Offices 

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phone: 603-525 420 \ 

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Contractual Agreement!: By reading 
this far , you obviously have a discern i ng 
eye for derail. Good. Mow we gofcha. 
Ruld^ are rul^s, and the rules say you 

must promise to encourage growth pt 
amateur radio wilh ever/ breath for the 
rest of your life. That doesrfi just mean 
new recruils Don': forget to Iry a new 
rnode Of frequency band once a year. 
You MUST work at least ten Movices 
each month. Most of afL you will men- 
tion 73 Amateur ftsdiO'*ri\h&^Q\^ identi- 
fication you make on the air and also to 
every radio and electronics rnerchant 
you meet. You wilt also praise or damn 
each issue of the magazine with feed- 
back c 9fds r tetters Th at strould be the 
easy pan, especially wilh your eya for 
detail 



OCTOBER 1988 




AMATEUR 
RADIO 



Issue # 337 



WD8AQX 



. . KT2B 



WB6IGP 



WB3KCZ 



TABLE OF CO NTENTS 

FEATURES 

10 Packets Full of Pixels 

Digital video is now avii liable to die mortal ham, . . . , , 

14 A Trip Through The iVIicrowave Spectrum 

The scoop on what goes on between 1 - 10 GHz. . . , , . 

20 10 GHz Polaplexer 

Unique way to go full-duplex on 3 cm 

24 VHF/UHF Tape Antenna 

Fast n* cheap way to get active on 2 meters and above . 

29 Portable Re-entrant Cavity Antenna 

This * 'can-do" whip gives belter HT antenna performance. . * 

33 Pee Wee Thirty Transceiver — Part 2 

The wind-up on getting on this rag-chewers' band 

35 Passions of the Ether 

See yourself in one of these amateur archetypes? . . . . N4RVE 

38 Antenna Systems — Part 2 

Antenna system demy stitlcation. .. 

40 Microwave Test Equipment for 10 GHz 

How to use the versatile detector mount. . , WB61GP 

77 Inexpensive Display for WEFAX 

Use your PC to check out the weather. N 1 VC 




P 



P 



W7AC! 



AC9E 



f- !t- t 



W3ZC 




REVIEWS 

13 Altnco 24T 144/440 MHz FM Transceiver 

Don't just take this reviewer's word for it — check out this little gem! . WA60HX 

27 SSB Electronics LT-33S 

30 W2DRZ 902 MHz Linear Transverter Module and Sequencer 

this, to get on this underused band with a 2-mcter rig* . . . , , . KT2B 

44 Down East Microwave Model 2345LY 

Unusual antenna with great gain on 1 .2 GHz. . . - ^ . . . . ....-,. KT2B 

58 Motron AK-10 

This unit ends unnecessary squelch breaks * _.._,.......... KAl JJM 



DEPARTMENTS 



FEEDBACK,,. 
FEEDBACK! 

It ' iji 1 i ke being there -'^ 
righi here in out offices! 
How? Juit Like advtinuigc 
of o!jr FEEDBACK CJird 
on page 8 ( . You' 1 1 notice 
a Iccdbaek utiniber ai 
the tH;ginningt>lcHch 
article 3 (id colunin. We'd 
like yi^ tu rate whM yvu 
read so rh;ji we can pr in I 
wh^at tyj)(js {>f ihtngs ytnj 
like be. 'si. And Then we 
win draw cmc Pcedb^ck 
c^rj each lYh^nth for a 
free .subscript ion to 73 . 



46 Above and Beyond 

80 Ad Index 
73 ATV 

68 Barter and Buy 
70 Dealer Directory 
94 Errata 

81 Feedback 
67 Hamsats 

64 Index ^ 10/88 
84 Letters 



6 Never Say Die 
54 New Products 
74 Prupagalion 
83 QRP 

9 QRX 
SO RTTY Lwp 
87 73 International 
63 Special Events 

4 Welcome t Newcomers 




Cover model Jim Ball, 73 Ad Sales Representative and son of John Bail WaGfV who is Director, Receiver 

Division at American Electronic Laboratories. W9GFV directs microwave fl and D tor Military, Commerctal, 

and Government app I icaltons, Jim is currently studying tor tits Mov^ce Ucket 

Photography by Suzanne Torstieya 

Tower for September cover courtesy of Ken Nelson of Oakham, M-A 



73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 5 



Number 2 on your Feedback card 



Never SAY DIE 

Wayne Green W2NSD/1 




Ham Fun 

If we're going to kicK-start ham 
radio we're going to have to put 
more fun into il— parlicularty for 
the kids. One easy way is to get 
oyrdubs going again with hidden 
transmitter hunts. 

Since this is vlrluatfy a lost art in 
America, we'lt be starting a 
column on fox hunting in Novem- 
ter. I hope we'd be able to build 
enthusiasm for the European 
styte of fox hunling — mostly done 
on foot instead of driving around 
in cars. This is better geared to 
getting youngsters into action. 
The exercise will be good for you 
old duffers too. Work off some of 
that paunch. 

The column will be written by 
JoeMoell KOOV, whoco^authored 
the book, "Transmitter Hunting: 
Radio Direction Finding Simpli- 
fied/' the ROFer's bible. 

(Meanwhile, f II be looking for ar- 
ticles from you on hiding transmit- 
ters, building miniature transmit- 
ters to hide, designing and building 
hand-held direction-finding anten- 
nas, and building small DP receiv* 
ers. Don't let me down on this. 



Of course there are practical 
RDF applications such as finding 
unidentified repeater pests and 
service net jammers^ locating a 
stol^en rig whrch suddenly appears 
on a repeater, finding TV cable 
leaks, finding line noise sources — 
things like that. 

If we can make fox hunting as 
popular here as il is in Europe and 
Asia, we may eventually be able to 
Held some teams for the interna- 
tional fox hunting contests in Eu- 
rope. 

Atlanta Was There — 
Where Were You? 

A few years ago il looked as if 
the Atlanta hams might be able to 
give Dayton a run. It hasn't hap- 
pened. It was gorng pretty well 
when Chaz Cone W4GKF was at 
the slick, building steam. 

Two years ago they moved the 
hamfest into the World Conven- 
tion Center, next to the Omni Ho- 
teL Big place, but the parking is 
expensive and a long walk from 
the hamfest— too far to carry 
heavy ham gear, the hotel's ex- 
pensive, and there are no nearby 
camping facilities. It's not easy to 





OSL OF THE MONTH 

To enter your OSL, mail it in an envelope to 73, WGE Center, 70 Rte. 
202 N., Peterborough NH 03458. Attn: QSL of the Month. Winners 
receive a one-year subscription (or extension) to 7$. Entries not in 
envelopes cannot be accepted. 

6 73 Amateur Badio * October, 1988 



get stuff In and out of the indoor 
flea market. 

The exhibits committee appar- 
ently gave so many booths to kx^ 
club groups and non-ham ex- 
hibitors that they ran out of com- 
mercial ham equipment exhibit 
space. This limited the dealers 
and manufacturers exhibits to a 
pitiful few. 

The talks were handled well, 
but were very sparsely attended. I 
only pufled about 25 or so for my 
two lalks. They might have pro- 
moted them a bit better, but most- 
ly it was the overall lack oi atten- 
dance^ The hamfest just wasn't 
supported by the local hams- 
much less those from neighboring 
states. 

I missed the 1 987 Hamfestival {1 
was visiting the USSR), but I was 
there for 1986 and it was very 
poorly attended, It was a bit better 
this year, but the hams from Geor- 
gia, Alabama and other nearby 
slates were staying away by the 
thousands. 

The few dealers who exhibited 
said their sales went well, with just 
about everything moving. Unlike 
1986 and 1987, the few hams who 
did come brought money and 
spent it. 

In the 70s, the Atlanta Hamfest 
was unique in that it regularly 
pulled bigger crowds on Sunday 
than Saturday. That's gone. Sun- 
day was a wasteland, with many 
exhibitors pulling down their 
booths two or three hours before 
the show's official closing time. 

As a known fooder, I was 
pleased to see a $5 buffet— rather 
good one, too. Plus they had free 
chow for the exhibitors, some- 
thing guaranteed to put on a 
pound or two for me. Fortunately I 
got trapped at the 73 booth by a 
long-winded ham filling me in in- 
depth on his station equipment, 
so I missed the dessert—all gone 
by the time I got therel 

Continued on pnge 90 



TAFF 



PUBLtSH£n;ED4T0fl 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 

ASSOCIATE PUBUSHER 
Stuart Ncfwood 

MANAOINO EDITOR 
Bryan HasNngs HS^B 

SENIOR EDlTOf^ 
Rebecca Ntemeia 

COPY EDITOR 

Linda IRerteau 

TECHNICAL EDIT on 
David McLananan WA1 FHB 

INTEIINATIONAL EDiTOf) 
HictianJ PfiHenis: 

ARTOlFiECTOF^ 

BotsDvkena 

<^tAFHiC OEStGN MANAGER 
Deborah Simtti 

GHAPHIC OESlGl^iER 

MafHyn llonin 

JAPAIiESE TWWStJiTOR 

Oawid Cowhig WA 1 LB P 

ASSOQATES 

Mike fir^c^ WBSV6£ 
t©C3*i Helcher N6HVK 

Jim Gfiy WlXU 

Chod Hams VP2ML 

Df . Man; L^avey WASAJR 

An^ M^cAftistef WA52I0 

6il( PasrernakWABrTF 

PmeiJ^utmflnKTJB 

Mike SLone WSAOC D 

Arliss Thompson W7XU 

ADVERnSlNO 
r-603- 525-4201 
1-500-225-5083 

BALIS MAHAOEI) 
Ed Vefbin 

ADVERTISING SALES 

Jim Ba^l 

SALES SERVICES MANAGER 

Hpp9 Currier 



WGE PUBLISHING, 
INC. 

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 

TimPsJkey 

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR 

flodfiey Bell 

TVPESETTING/PAGINATION 

Bob Dukette, Systems Supervisor 

Steve Jewell KA i MPM. Lin<la Drew, 

Susan All«n 

GRAPHICS SERVICES 

Richard CFafk^. Manager 

Sue 6. Flanagan, 

Jodt Jofirtson. Da^e Wtlhama 

GRAPHICS PHOTOGRAPHER 
Dan CrcKeay 

EdltodaJ Offices 

WGE Cen3ef 

Petert»rQugh, IS^H 03460-1 194 

fi(&S^&420l 

Subecffption Cuatomer Sftfvieft 

t-80<>€25-0&43 

Cotorado/Foreign ^t^Kribcra 

csi 1-303-W7 9330 

Waynd Green Ent&ri^nses & a drnfticiii 
of Intemetional Daia Gfoi^. 

^ Amateur A^to (ISSN 083^5309^ 
IS pubi^tied monHify try WGE PubJtsJv 
ing, Inc , a di¥ision or Wayne Gieen 
Enmfprises, Inc., WGf C«nit^', Pflter- 
^orougti NH 034£&-1l94 Enlife 
conlents €■ 1968 tpy WGE PublishirTg, 
Inc. No pa^ of Itiis publication may tie 
reproeluced Mrirhoui wrtiten pefmiiilon 
from |h€ pyt^ish<9r 








...pacesetter in Amateur Radio 



Double Take ! 




TM-621A/721A 



144/220 and 144/450 MHz 
FM Dua[ Banders 

Once again J Kenwood brings you 
another Dual Bander FirstI The 
TM-621A is the first 144/220 MHz FM 
Dual Bander The Kenwood TM-621A 
and TIM-721A (144/450 MHz) re- 
defines the original Kenwood ''Dual 
Bander^' concept. The wide range of 
innovative features includes a dual 
channel watch function, selectable 
full duplex operation, 30 memory 
channels, extended frequency 
coverage, large multi-color dual 
digital LCD displays, programmable 
scanning, and more! 

• Extended receiver range (138 000- 
173,995 MHz) on 2 m; 70 cm coverage 
is 438.000-449,995 MHz; 1-1/4 m cover- 
age is 215-229.995 MHz. (Specifications 
guaranteed on Amateur bands only. Two 
meter transmit range is 144-148 MHz. 
Modifiable for MARS/CAP. Permits 
required.) 

• Separate frequency display for 
"main" and "sub-band!* 

• Call channel function. A special 
memory ctiannel for each band stores 
frequency, offset, and sub-tone of your 
favorite channel. Simply press the CALL 
key, and your favorite channel is selected ! 

Optional Accessories: 

• RC-10 Multi-function handset/remote 
controller * PS-430 Power supply • TSU-6 
CTCSS decode unit • SW-IOOB Compact 
SWR/power/volt meter • SW-200B Deluxe 
SWR/power nneter • SWT-1 2 m antenna 
tuner • SWT-2 70 cm antenna tuner • SP-40 
Compact mobile speaker • SP-50B Deluxe 



• 30 multi-function mennory channels. 

14 memory channels and one call 
channel for each band store frequency 
repeater offset CTCSS, and reverse. 
Channels Wand "b" establish upper 
and lower limits for prog ram nrtable band 
scan, Channels "C" and "d" store transmit 
and receive frequencies independently 
for "odd splits: 

• 45 Watts on 2 m, 35 watts on 70 cm. 
25 W3tts on 1-1/4 m. Approx. 5 watts 
low power 

• Automatic Band Change (A,B.C.) 
Automatically changes between main 
and sub- band when a signal is present. 

• Dual watch function allows VHF and 
UHF receive simultaneously. 

• Programmable memory and band 
scanning, with memory channel 
lock-out and priority watch function. 

• Balance control and 
separate squelch 
controls for each 
band. 



• Dual antenna ports. 

• TM-621A has auto offset 
^ Full duplex operation. 

• CTCSS encode /decode selectable 
from front panel or UP/DWN keys on 
microphone. (Encode built-in, optional 
TSU'6 needed for decode.) 

• Each function key has a unique tone 
for positive feedback. 

• Illuminated front panel controls 
and keys. 

• 16 key DTMF mic. included. 

• Handset/remote control option 
(RC-10), 

• Frequency (dial) lock. 

• Supplied accessories: 16-key DTMF 
hand mia, mounting bracket, DC cable. 



Complete aefvico mmtuSiSs^re' available foraf! Kenwood 
tfanscei)/&'sand most accGssories. Spedficattons. features, 
and prices are subject to change without notice or obligation. 




TM-721A i'how/i with optional RC-10 



mobile speaker • PG-2N DC cable • PG-3B 
DC line noise filter ^ MC-60A, MC-aO, 
MC-85 Base slatton mics. • MA-4000 Dual 
band 2 m/70 cm mobile antenna (mount not 
supplied) • MB-11 Mobile bracket « MC-43S 
UP/DWN hand mic* MC-48B le-key DTMF 
hand mic. 



KENWOOD 

KENWOOD U.S.A. CORPORATION 
2201 E, Dominguez St., Long Beach, CA 90810 
RO. Box 22745, Long Beach, CA 90801-5745 








. . . pacesetter in Amateur Radio 




TS-940S 



Competition class 
HF transceiver 

TS-940S— the standard of 
performance by which all 
other transceivers are judged. 
Pushing the state-of-the-art 
in HF transceiver design and 
construction, no one has been 
able to match theTS-940S in 
performance, value and reli- 
abiiity. The product reviews 
glowwith superlatives, and 
the field-proven performance 
shows that theTS-940S is 
''The Number One Rated HF 
Transceiverf" 

• 100% duty cycle transmitter. 

Kenwood specifies transmit duty 
cycle fJme-The TS-940S is guar- 
anteed to operate at full power 
output (or periods exceeding 
one hour. (14.250 MHz. CW, 110 
watts,) Perfect lor RTTY, SSTV, 
and other long-duration modes. 

• First with a full one-year 
limited warranty. 

• Extremely stable phase lock- 
ed loop (PLL) VFO. Reference 
frequency accuracy is measured 
in part^ per milUon! 



CW VBT 




(CW) 



I Desired 
, signals 

(CW) 

lnt«rteriiiid 
signaJt 

(SSB) 



CW VBT 



Hi-Cut 
SLOPE 

TUNE^ 



Lo-Cut 
[-^ SLOPE 



signal 




TUNf 

signal 

fSSB) 
Interfering 

(CW) 



SSB SLOPE TUHE 



2. 



Iiiterferrri9 
signal 




AF tune Operation 

I T he: AF TUt^E' fii net ron ted uc es 
interfering ?ign^(s aid white noise 

iTfils, fyhcUOn stioutd'jpftt.v m used 
lunng operaubn sri.the t:.W rnode 



4. 



In ji«ii$nns Signal 
Notch tutor (CWJ 




Desired sJ^na I 

iSSB) 



\n\9x\%nnsk siflrial is in the center 
of th«i:l«ttr»d signal 



1) CW Variable Bandwidth Tuning. Vary tlie 
pa&sband width cDntinunusly in the CW, FSK, 

ard AM modes, without affecting the centef 
fiequency. This effectively minimizes QR1\fl 
frorti nearby SSB and CWsignals. 

2) AFTuM.Enabieri with the push of a button, 
this CW intEffefencB fighter inserts a tun- 
able, three pule active filter between theSSB/ 
CWtlemodulator and the audio ainpNfier.Our- 
injf CW OSDs, this control can be used to 
reduce interfermg signals antl noise, and 
peaks audio frequency response for optimuim 
CW performance. 



3}SSBSIopeTjning.nparaUngintheLSBaod 

USB mndes, this trnnl panel contrni allnws 
ind ependenl, continuously variable adjusl- 
ment ofthe higfi □rlowfrequencyslopesofthe 
IF passband.The LCD sub display illustrates 
thefilterrng position. 

4) IF Notch Filter. The tunable notch filter 

sharply attenuates interfering signals by as 
much as40 dB.As shown here, the tntertenng 
signal is retluoed, while the desired signal 
remains unaffected The notch fUter works in 
all modes except FM. 



« Complete all band, all mode 
transceiver with general 
coverage receiver. Receiver 
covers 15D kHz-30 MHz. AIJ 
modes built-in: AM. FM- CW. FSK, 
LSB, USB. 

• Superb, human engineered 
front panel layout for the 
DX-minded or contesting 
ham. Large fluorescent tube 
main display with dimmer; direct 
keyboard input of frequency; 
flywheel type main tuning knob 
with optical-encoder mechanism 
all combine to make the TS-940S 
a joy to operate, 

• One-touch frequency check 
(T-F SET) during split 
operations. 

• Unique LCD sub display indi- 
cates VFO, graphic indication 
of VBT and SSB Slope tuning, 
and time. 

• Simple one step mode chang- 
ing with CW announcement. 

• Other vital operating func- 
tions. Selectable semi or full 
break-in CW (QSK), RIT/XIT. all 
mode squelch, RF attenuator, filter 
select switch, selectable AGC, 
CW variable pitch conlrol, speech 
processor, and RF power output 
control, programmable band 
scan or 40 channel memory scan. 



Optional accessories: 

• AT-940 full range (160-10m) automatic 
antenna tuner* SP-940 external spGaker 
with audio filtering • YG-455C-1 (500 H^), 
YG-455CN-1 (250 Hz). YK-88C-1 (500 Hz) CW 
filters; YK-88A-1 {6 kHz) AM filter • VS-t voice 
synthesizer • SO-1 temperature compensated 

Cornplefe %^jv\cb munuafs nfBavathble fofdti Kenwood nanscetvef sand mQst&ccf^sson^s. 
SpecifiCdlionS: features stnd prices are subfea to change ^rfhouf noUc&- or obSigation 



crystal oscillator* MC-43S UP/DOWN hand 
mtc* MC-60A, MC-80, MC-as deluxe base, 
station rnics.* PC-1A phone patch • TL-922A 
linear amplifier* SIVl-220 station monitor 
• BS-8 pan display • SW-200A and SW'2O0O 
SWR and power meters • iF-232C/IF-10B 
computer interface. 



KENWOOD 

KENWOOD U.S.A. CDRPORATION 
2201 E. Dominguez St, Long Beach, CA 90810 
Pp. Box- 22745. Long Beach. CA 9080^5745; 



QRX 



Number 3 on your Feedback card 



EDITED BY BRYAN HASTINGS NS1B 



Write On! 



Want to earn some extra money and see 
your name in print, to boot? Due to the 

reader feedback we've been getting for the 
past year, 73 Magazine will be running more 
reviews and light construction articles. To 
facilitate this shifty we need help from you, 
our faithful readership. 

Builders generally don't try to write about 
what they buiid, mostly out of pen fright, but 
the ptain fact is anyone can write . Ask for our 
writer's guidelines to see how easy it is. And 
don*t worry if your prose isn't perfect — 
coherence is the main point. If your idea is 
good and reasonably explained, we will pay 
you top doJIar for your piece. 

How about an intriguing piece of ham 
gear on which you can't find a write-up any- 
where? Perhaps you cou\d be Ihe first to tell 
the world about it! Send for our reviewer's 
form sheeti 

73 Magazine is your forum. Don't keep 
your great ideas hidden rn the shack — 
bring 'em out for hamdom to read! 



Joe Ham 



Jack Speer N1BIC of Buckmaster, Inc. re- 
ceives the monthly computer FCC data 
tapes of alt licensed amateur radio opera- 
tors. From the master file of all US licensed 
ham radio operators as of year end 1987, 
he determined the average age of US hams: 
50 years. 

Spread Spectrum 



In an effort to pack more sigrtal$ into a 
given piece of spectrum, engineers have 
traditionally looked for ways to minimize the 
bandwidth of radio signals. Imagine, howev- 
er, a signal whose energy is spread out over 
a vast piece of spectrum — say, 500 MHz — 
so that the only effect it has on the ear is a 
slight raising of the noise floor. This is called 
spread spectrum (SS). Communications 
using this mode are possible when a trans- 
mitter and receiver follow identical FWI 
schemes. Two SS signals occupying the 
same piece of spectrum, but using different 
modulation schemes, do not interfere with 
each other. Since the variety of possible 
waveforms and deviations (which compose 
a scheme) are nearly infinite, then it's possi- 
ble to pack very many signals on the same 
piece of spectrum. 

Many of you may be aware of the research 
going on with SS in the military and defense 
organizations, but few are aware that this is 
a legal mode for amateur radiol Those inter- 
ested in finding out the latest in SS research 
for ham radio should contact the Amateur 
Radio Research and Development Corpora- 



tion (AM RAD). Their address is PO Drawer 
6148. McLean, VA 22106-6148, 

You car> also contact the AMRAO CBBS at 
(703) 734-1387. The system accepts 300, 
12Q0, and 2400 baud, and the data path 
settings are 8 data bits, 1 stop fait, and no 
parity. 

USSR 
Packet Radio? 

On 2a June at 0a24Z, Bill SEack NX2P 
worked UA3CR via packet radio on 14,105 
MHz, Readers may recognize the Soviet call 
as none other than that of Leonid Labutin, 
whose interview appeared in the April issue 
under Ham Profiles. He is a foremost Soviet 
ham who coordinated communications for 
the Canada/USSR polar ski trek thai took 
place earlier this year^ Leo is also avidly 
interested In packet radio, but at the time of 
the interview indicated that packet radio was 
not then an accepted amateur mode in the 
USSR. This has apparently changed! 

Racketeers who hear UA3CR and want to 
connect with him should bear in mind that 
Leo may have his transmit and received fre- 
quencies offset. Bill correctly guessed this 
after a half dozen retries, though signals 
were strong and the channel was cJear. To 
effect the offset, simply move the frequency 
in small steps until you get a response to a 
connect request, and then adjust the RIT 
until you can decode the response. 

Japan Ham News 

Two bits of news from the Land of the 
Rising Sun: 

— The JARL will soon begin work on an- 
other flight model of the JAS-1 with an eye 
toward launching a second amateur radio 
satellite, tentatively called JAS-1 b. 

^According to a report released by the 
Telecommunications Bureau of the Ministry 
of Posts and Telecommunications, as of 31 
March 1988, they have issued a totat of 
1p60a,12& amateur radio operator licenses. 
The JARL News did not indicate whether 
this figure represents all such licenses is- 
sued, or just current licenses. 

More Able Cable 

\f the FCC has its way, you may get cable 
television delivered by the telephone 
company. The FCC says it may allow tele- 
phone companies to enter the cable televi- 
sion business in the same areas it allows 
phone service. The proposal may be just 
what's needed to get the telephone compa- 
nies to install fiber optic wiring into resi- 
dences, which currently costs a subscriber 
four times the amount over the installation of 



copper wiring. Fiberoptic (lightwave) wiring 
of homes also allows phone companies to 
provide two-way services, pay per view TV, 
security, interactive video, and many other 
services not possible with copper wiring. 



NIAC 



Wayne Green W2NSD/1 has sent a letter 
to members of the amateur radio industry 
concerning the need for forming a Nation* 
al Industrial Advisory Committee (NtAC). 
The NIAC would act as a liaison between the 
amateur radio community and the FCC. 

Green says that a previous NIAC was 
supported by the FCC, which provided a 
meeting room and support materiaJs but 
"austerity programs finally doomed it." 
Wayne wants to revive it. saying: ''We've let 
what was a hobby that provided virtually all 
the R & D for the communications industry 
rot. By allowing about 90% of the school 
radio clubs to die 25 years ago we've cut off 
the input of youngsters — the people who 
were doing most of the inventing and 
pioneering.*' He wants NIAC to research 
ways of attracting youngsters to ham ra- 
dio . . . and to provide a voice with the FCC to 
help stave off a further loss of frequencies. 

Wayne wants the N(AC to meet four times 
a year. The main annual meeting would take 
place in Washington DC, and the other three 
would take place at the three major ham- 
fests— Orlando/winter, Dayton/sprrng, and 
Atlanta/summer. There would also be a 
monthly NIAC newsletter. 

For more info on NIAC, contact Wayne at 
75 HQ, at the address listed below. 



Lithium Ceii 
Warning 



Do you realize that your (modern) HT 
may cofftaln a miniature bomb? Lithium 
cells, used to maintain memory contents 
even when external power is removed, con- 
tain a volatile and toxic compound called 
thionyl chloride. Trying to force current back 
into these cells can result in a devastating 
explosion! Consider the case where a bus 
ticket dispensing machine was being re- 
paired when the iithium battery's blocking 
diode failed. The resulting explosion injured 
five people who required hospital treatment 
for fume inhalation. 



Big Thaniis 



...to the AMRAD Newsletter, JARL 
News, the ARRL Gateway, CO Bars, and 
W3YI Report for this month's out-of-house 
news. Keep your news items and photos 
rolling in to 73 Magazine, 70 Rt 202 N, Peter- 
borough. NH 03458-1 194, Attn: QRX. 



73 Amateur Radio ■ October, 1988 9 



Number 4 on your Feedback card 



Packets Full of Pixels 



Packet Scan Amateur Television 



by Robert G. Pratt WD8AQX 



My many hohhics include amateur 
radio, cumputcrs, and video, 1 
recently discovered a way to combine 
all three imo a fun-filled "super hob- 
by" Ihai results in very -slow-scan 
tclcviiibn images fient across town or 
around the world via paeket radio. 

Packet radio can be used for almost 
every type of communicaiion, from 
simple me^ssages and QSOs, to sending 
computer programs and data files. 
Once a compuier file exists, it is sim- 
ple to transfer its contents to another 
stalion over a packci radio connection. 

My first cxperimcms in whal I call 
'Packet Scan Television" (PSTV) ^ 
took place in early May 198H, shortly 
after an exciting trip to the Dayton 
HamVcntion. One of the things that 
attracted my attention while rti^sing 
around Hara Arena in Dayton early 
that Saturday morning, was a display 
by Kinney Software. ' They developed 
a computer program and a small video 
digitizer circuit that could be plugged 
into the user pun of a Commcxlore 64 
computer,^ 

Their system is designed to take a 
video signal from u camera or VCR, and 
convert it into a digitized bit pattern that the 
computer can display on its screen and store 
tn a disk file. The electrimie circuit is a syn- 
chronized vidct> sampler which operates un- 
der control of the computer. Each horizontal 
line of the incoming video signal is sampled at 
a certain point and a pixel (picture element) Is 
collected and digitized. When each line of the 
incoming picture has been sampled ai the 
same point, a column of digitized video infor- 
mation has been obtained. This is stored in 
the cufupuier's memory. 

The timing is advanced, then a r^w column 
is santpled slightly to the right of the pre v ions 
column. When added to the computer's mem- 
ory, a new. wider column of video informa- 
tion is created- When the entire width of the 
incoming picture has been sampled, the com- 
puter contains an 8K byte file which fully 
describes the picture in digital format. 

To get ycHi started on this project, Kinney 
Software offers an etched circuit board, full 
documeniation. and the software to perform 
these amazing videt> tricks. The sale price at 
Dayton was a paltry S35, and 1 couldn't resist 
what hxfked like a bargain. As it turns out, 

10 73 Amateur Radio • October. 1988 




Photo A. Kinney video iii^iiizing cinuiL 

my purchase of their Video Digitizer was a 
good investment. 

On my return home, an extra $20 at Radio 
Shack provided all the necessary electronic 
pans. For those less inclined to go shopping, 
or those who have only a meager spare pans 
box in the basement, parts kit KVD #fJl can 
by purchased from Midwest Surplus Elec- 
tronics, PO Box 607, Fairborn, Ohio 45324. 
The price is S19,95 plus S2.0Q shipping and 
handling. 

The Kinney Circuit 

This circuit consists of four integrated cir- 
cuits, four transistors, several capacitors, a 
handful of resistors, five pots, and a couple of 
connectors (see Photo A), It t<xik Utnger to 
buy the parts than to install them. In a couple 
of shon evenings , it was all together and 
ready for the smoke test. 

One of the nice thiniis about this little eem 
of a circuit is that it actuallv worked when I 
first turned it on. There was no troubleshoot- 
ing, weeping, or gnashing of teeth. Well, I 
have simplified il a bit to spare you some of 
the details. 1 DID have to adjust the pots. It 
look aboyt five minutes and was done **by 



guess and by gosh," with a little help 
from the Kinney instruction sheet. 

Is That Me? 

I had set up my video camera in 
anticipation of the circuit working, hut 
when the screen initially sprang to life 
under conirol of the software, there 
was nothing but a big white square. I 
studied it carefully, wondering what to 
do. 

1 cranJced the brightness pot on the 
circuit board down to % scale, and a 
black and white scene appeared, show- 
ing equipment on shelves and the rear 
view of a fellow hunching over a com- 
puter keyboard, h must be some image 
they put on the demonstration disk, I 
thought, although the scene looked 
vaguely familiar. 1 leaned back to re- 
consider. 

A few seconds later, the fellow on 
my screen was now also leaning back 
in his chair. I'm not always quick to 
grasp a new concept, but when this one 
finally sunk in, I let out a shout that the 
neighbors are still talking about. From 
that great beginning, everything has 
continued to go welL 

The circuit and software capture a new 
picture from your camera or VCR over a 
period of about three seconds. Each sample is 
digitized by the compuier and stored in a 
bii-map memory. The software t Photo B) 
allows you to select the gray scale from 2 
(black and white) to 8 (six shades of gray 
between black and white). You can * 'pseudo- 
color" the images by substituting other col- 
ors for the gray shades. You can also com- 
mand the computer to save the pictures (black 
and white only) to the disk and recall them for 
later viewing. 

The on-screen menu (Photo C) also prtK 
vides for picture storage in formats compat- 
ible with other graphics software, such as 
Prim Shop. Newsroom, Koala, and DiKHJie. 
This latter featurie is a real bonus because il 
allows you to print the captured pictures on a 
conventional printer, or use them in newslet- 
terarticies, fvc tried two of these alreadv and 

■r 

found that Print Shop does a nice job. News* 
room picmre primouis, however* appear 
somewhat coarse and lacking in detail . 

A nice feature of the Print Shop program^ is 
that the user can add text to the video image 



by using some of ihe commands in Print 
Shop's Screen Magic section, I iried this by 
taking a picture of mc in my ham shack* 
facing the camera this time to shoiA my bcucr 
side (Photo DU then adding my call letters to 
the lower teft comer. It worked fine, and 
when Kavcd to disk . prtxluced a file thut could 
be read back into the Video Digitizer pro- 
gram for ''slide-show'" rj^pe displays. 

The Inspiration 

I was chuckling about my great success 
with this project when another idea hit mc- 
Since I can store the picture in an 8K disk file, 
why not transfer the file over packet radio 
to someone else so he can view the picture on 
his screen, or commit it to posterity on his 
printer? 

Gerry Gomes (WB8RNY) lives about 25 
miles south of mc, has the same computer I 
have, the same Kinney and Print Shop soft- 
ware, and a great experimenter's mentality. 
Gerr>' and 1 have whiled away many hours on 
the Edison UHF repeater while hunched over 
our computers, desperately trying to untangle 
the mysteries of wayward electrons. 



KtHHtV soriiMRt 

IfWGE-lZEt 
n A I H n £ H D 



l^^8 LEUCi 
e=G LOEL 
€=4 LEUEL 

11=2 LCyEL 



If ^fWMU 

V =FILE ItHU 

F3=H0LD 
F5=8EPEftI 



=5 LEUEL 
f LEUELCPSHDP+&t» 



(C) 13S7 KlHttCV SQFTUAirE 
ULL R16HTS fiES£RUE& 



Photo B. Kinney Sttfiware gray-$ca(e select km 
menu. 

1 called Gerry on the repeater, and he was 
m intrigued as I was about trying to send 
my first picture file. It took several minutes 
to make the packet transfer on 2 meters, then 
I waited while Gerry loaded the Kinney 
software. 

*'Whai will the picture show?'* he wanted 
to know. **Not a fair question,'* I said. The 
real test would be to see if he could figure out 
what it was. 



FILE 11 E H U 

REHOUE tieiTIZEfi PSOGItaFt DISK 
mSEBT PiOPERLV FOemiTED DISK 



SELECT FILE SftVE FGRWftT 

simpmu - S 

KDAIA = K 

DOODLE - P 
PRIHTSHDP= P 
NCltSROOn = H 



REUIFU DISK DIRECIORV^ 
LOAI^ ItlAGE rum DISK ^ 
HtNU 

mDQLOR mnu 

» EflTER warn SELECT TOH 



Photo C. Kimtry St^ftware onscreen menu. Tltis 
provider for picture xtoraj^c mfomuim vompafihh* 
with oihet ^ntphks software. 





Fhaios D, E Phoiu^raph ofWmAQKin his shack 
miles itiitty %'m 2-merer packet video. 

The world's longest two minutes passol, 

then the repeater burst to life again. '*Wow, 
it's your ham shack and you 're silting right in 
the middle of itf" he shouted. The picture 
(Photo £) was not as clear as a regular televi- 
sion image because of the lower resolution of 
the digitizing process, but Gerry was able to 
describe some of the equipment in rny shack, 
and tell that I had a silly smirk on my face. 
Not bad for our first shot at *' Packet Scan 
Television/' 

Gerry then loaded the Prim Shop program 
on his C'64, entered the picture file I had just 
transmitted to him. and printed a copy of my 
picture on paper. Although not quite as sharp 
as the video display, the paper allows you to 
permanently save a hard copy of the image 
for decorating a wall or using in a newsletter, 

Gerrv had not yet built the Kinney circuit 



, and the same image received by Gerry WBSRNY' 25 



when this first great experiment took place, 
so he was not able lo digitize an original 
picture from his camera. The Kinney disk 
contains some demonstration pictures, how- 
ever, and he decided to take one of these, 
modify it using the Print Shop Screen Magic 
program, and send the picture back to mc so 
we could claim a two-way video exchange. 

A few minutes later my packet TNC sprang 
to life with a connect from WB8RN Y and the 
picture was on its way. While waiting fur the 
transfer lo finish, I grabbed the mike on my 
UHF rig and made the same mistake Gerry 
had made earlier. "What will I see?'' I usked, 
**You tell me/* he said. 

When the transfer was complete, J saved 
his file to disk, loaded the Kinney "'Video 



vt 



Cont'mued tm page 94 
73 Amateur Radio • Octobef, 1986 11 




i 



f 



f 



CTf=lOfMtCS 



20705 South Western Ave.. Suite 104 Torrance, CA 90501 -a {213)618-8616 






feBffl9 



The NEW Generation of TT,& T, Hand Held Transceivers 
From Alinco Are Just Around the Corner! 

Introducing The DJ-100T 2 Meter Hand Held Transceiver 

• Tiny = 1-3/16" D x 2-3/8" W x 6-5/8" H 

• Tough = 6.5 Watts (With Optional EBP-8NAZ Nicd Battery Pack) 
•Terrific = Features and Benefits 

• LCD with Switchable Backlighting 

• 10 Memories 

• BNC Antenna Connection 

• 16 Button DTMFPad 

• Easily Accessible Dip Switches For Encoding 

Sub Audible Tones 

• Battery Save Draws 15mA For Extended 
Battery Life 

• .20uV Sensitivity 

• 144,00 l\4H2 to 147 995 MHz 

• CAP and MARS Modifiable - Sinnplex only 

• Standard Battery, EBP-9NAZ 
Has DC /DC Converter Built In 

• Stores Standard Repeater Offsets In Memory 

• Full Range of Accessories 

• 220 MHz and 440 MHz To Follow Shortly 







(Optional EBP-2NAZ Ni^Cd battery) 



CmCLE 67 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



A-Tccn - Bwtw*. €A 


EGE^ir^ -S^oimWI 


MSC - S«ita Clara. CA 


HftL ElacADnks * HandtamL OH 


Aimaur A^Mvinc* Comm. ^ WHmington. D£ 




HSC ■ BacrarMnta^ CA 


Hano RadicL fMho. NV 


hmmmgtCumm I^TC, -S#nAniton«o.TX 


FtM B«Aw4cs -GiW«tKlfXL NC 


HSC Sunrrrvaia. CA 


Bwendei iiiMWliHis - Ocrfy. NH 


AF^-UiwA^eft. W1 


WOfA Qk^vws - CnifawpMk IL 


MwitMlanai RadHa Syvttfiw - MtairM^ R. 




AES-Ortmtefl 


TheHa^aaian . EvnvniK, m 


Jun'i E^auiDum - CijUitf C«y. CA 


llDBefi's BadroncB - Wliiiuat. WV 


AE5-CtMw^w,FL 


Th* Hwn Hut - Airwflo. TX 


nMWOy AHlOBlpMB ^ ^Sflft AnHfMQs Tn 


Rob DWpiuftrig C43. - Pf «iloft g> 


AE5 - Laa ^l^H. f«V 


Htfry RhUq- HvHor^ GT 


MJ DK»otyc* *HoyBton. TX 


SaMiveCv^-Mmnpeiit^ MH 


AuMiiY AiRitiiir RMiO Slippi|f - AdlttW TX 




MMtoQfi ^hKbonici ' MouBton. TX 


TctOoni Bactromc Cornm. - UAMon. MA 




rmK>>?S4PVt WP^ - WHWInWIIil, flT 


HlfjftinJ rw^k^Cam^ - LairtC wD 




mm0mat ikaamm CtirtUK - wmm^mm. SO 


I4fi BvarvHc* - iitfifcggi. Ml 


liwnpMi Amalauf Btcvonict - liamphs, TH 


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GtrtondBOonifnCamtr - Cwitw, CO 


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lileM0«i PMI» Mi. Clanwta. m 


VHF Cqniig^ffifitliona + JiHuailffMi, filf 


EMsH^pv AmMBur Sufipty^ MpvCflMl*. OE 


l«IO'A8if«a.GA 


IMiolQn CwMuMne - HouKon. Tx 


TWiwuH— tiSaiaK, CfiOfeK. NC 


Odc'i CgmmuiiteiMn - HiB—wt> dA 


mo-BirtigvneLCA 


MiMouH nsdid Canttr . Kar««i COy. MO 




Ef OHQKtal Onffianici - Br own«#«. TX 
FFB - ^fmrmm. VA 


HPO - CMdnd. CA 
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MAS Elactr<3nbcm - Mamt, PL 


CANADA: 


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(4lG}^?-S044 



Numbers on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Jennifer Roe WA60HX 



Alinco 24T 144/440 MHz FM Transceiver 

This little rig gets anA + 



Alinco Elect rentes Inc. 

20705 South Western Ave., Suite 104 

Torrance, C A 90501 

(213)618-8616 

Price: $637,95 




Most hams shopping for a new mobile FM 
rig have at least narrowed down the 
choice offerings from the Big Three manufac- 
turers. Tm here to offer some simple advice to 
those folks: Wake up! Take a close look at 
Alinco's 24T* This is one of the nicest, easiest- 
touse rigs fn fts class, and for a very reason- 
able price. 

This iiltie black beauty offers virtually every 
feature an FMer could desire in a Z^h pound 
package. Besides two VFOs. 21 memories, 
and 25 watts on both bands, the 24T boasts a 
DTMF encoder, subaudible tone encoding 
and decoding, a built*in duplexer, pro* 
grammable offset frequency, priority channel 
designation, and scanning {140-150M40- 
449.995 UHzl The SV^" by 2" by eva" pack- 
age will mount almost anywhere in today's 
cramped car interiors. 

First impressions can make or break a 
friendship. The 24T's cheerful, informative, 
light green LCD and simple control layout do 
not intimidate the new user, unlike so many 
rigs these days. Every function is clearly 
jabeied, and most are self-explanatory. Three 
switches atop the unit select scan resumption 
delay {0 or 4 seconds), scanning speed 
(4 channeis per second or 20 channels per 
secondj. and beep onioff. When turned on, 
the beep reminds the user of frequency 
changes, especially useful when he or she 
can't devote any eye time to the rig. A resel 
switch next to the switches clears all memory 
and returns Ihe CPU to its factory-pro- 
grammed state. 

Masters of the obvious will, no doubt, 
wonder at the mic connector missing from the 
front panel. Not to worry! The rear panel 
sports a 6" cable with an 8-pin male mic con- 
nector, to which the microphone attaches. 
Similarly, a female UHF connector dangles 
from another short, rear-mounted cable. Why 
take up precious front and rear panel space 
with big connectors? The main advantage of 
this arrangement seems to be installation 
flexibility and neatness. No more need for 
UHF elbow adapters, crimped coax, or panels 
obscured by cables run amok. 

Further, easy access to the antenna con- 
nector, the quick-disconnect power cable, and 
a snap-in mobile mount, cut radio installation 
and removal lime to just a few seconds. In ten 
seconds or less the radio can be out of sight, 



secure from prying eyes and fingers at shop- 
ping malls or darkened urban streets. The 
safest radio is one that isn't there to steaL 

Travellers or those who change vehicles 
frequently will like the 24Ts smalt size, light 
weight, and ease of installation. Solder a 
cigarette lighter plug to Ihe power cord, throw 
a small mag-mount antenna into a suitcase, 
and voila! A complete VHF/UHF station ready 
for action anywhere. 

The rig's 25 watts on both bands let it reach 
out and touch just atwut any repealer worth 
bringing up, and it gives plenty of margin for 
fonQKlistance simplex operations. With a Bird 
4381 power meter and a SOO load, I measured 
23.5-26.5 and 22^25 watts oulput on the 144 
and 440 MHz bands, respectively. Low power 
measurements, S-SWand 5.3-6W, ran slight- 
ly higher than the specified 5 watts. The unit 
draws about 300 mA in the receive mode and 
just over 5A while transmitting at high power. 

Initial set up and operation is straight- 
forward. Turn the power on with the ON/OFF/ 
VOLUME knob, adjust the squelcin setting 
with the concentric ring, and tune to the appro- 
priate frequency with the larger, main tuning 
knob on the far left of the front panel. The 
UP/DOWN tune buttons on the hand mic also 
change frequency. Two smati buttons under- 
neath the main tuning knob change the fre- 
quency up or down in one megahertz incre- 
ments. Another small button selects high or 
low power, and the fourth button in this panel 
position initiates scanning. Seven of the eight 
buttons on the rig's right front panel are dual- 
function. Alternate functions are selected by 
first pressing the F button, then pressing the 
correct funtlon key. 

For repeater operation, the +/- offset key 
alternativefy toggles between — ,+, and sim- 
ptex. Unusual offsets can be programmed 
simply by hitting F, OW (offset write), and by 
using the tuning knob to select the correct 
offset. The user can select 6, 10, 15, 20, or 25 
kHz tuning steps in a similar way after bitting 
FpTS {tuning step)* 

Storing frequencies in the 21 memories Is 
as easy as one, two, three. The MR key cuts 
the mode to memory recall. Use the MHz tun- 
ing keys to selecl a memory. Tune the appro- 
priate frequency into VFO A or B, and h*t the 
MW {memory wrrte) key. Memories 1 and 2 
contain *'cali channels,'' which are frequently 



used channels you will want to be able to recall 
quickly with one or two keystrokes (CALL 1 , 
or F. CALL 2), Memories 20 and 21 store low- 
er and upper scan limits, respectively. Scan* 
ning in memory recall mode will Initiate step* 
ping through all 21 memories. The memories 
store all programmed information, including 
offset, subaudible tone selection, and priority 
channel designation, (The 24T samples the 
priority channel one second out of every six 
seconds.) 

No options to buy here, either. The 24T 
includes both a subaudible tone decoder and 
encoder. The decoder functions as a "lone 
squelch*: that is. the squelch will not break 
until the appropriate tone is received. Of 
course, the encoder transmits a subaudible 
tone for other transceivers or repeaters em- 
ploying tone squelches. One of the 37 CTCSS 
tones are selected by hitting TONE and select- 
ing ENCODE. DECODE, both followed by F» 
TONE NO. and tuning in the right tone with the 
main tuning knob. 

The 24T features a built-in dupEexer. With a 
single dual-band antenna, the rig can operate 
In a crossband. full duptex mode. (Use of iwo 
antennas requires an external duplexer.) 
Loading the separate transmit and receive fre- 
quencies in the Iwo VFOs and pressing F, 
DUAL enables this mode. This is also handy 
for programming non-standard offsets not 
viable with the OW function. 

The Alinco 24Ts electret condenser mic 
sounds pretty darned good on transmtt, and 
its 2 watts of audio power is more than ade- 
quate for noisy road conditions. The speaker 
is on the bottom^ suitable for most installa- 
tions. Those not satisfied with the rig*s internal 
speaker can always plug an 8D external 
speaker into the jack in back. 

Racketeers should rejoice to find adequate 
audio qualities and performance for their fa- 
vorite mode. On the down side, Alinco does 
NOT provide audio on the mic connector. 
However, pin 6 is left free for what should be a 
relatively easy modification to correct this 
deficiency. 

This rig is, in a word, HOT. It looks and 
sounds good. There are no nasty surprises 
like three*handed control combinations. 
There are NO options lo purchase for full- 
featured operation. Above all, Ihe price is 
fantastic. 



73 Amateur Radio • October, 1 988 13 



Number 6 on your Feedback card 



A Trip Through 



The IVBcrowa 



fictrum 



Ip, and Away to J < 

by Pete Putman KT2B 



Lei's try something fun for a momem. 
Grab a ruler, or a lapc measure if it's 

handy. Got it? Pick up a pencii cind draw a 
line 5" long. Now use ihe ruler lo divide it in 
half, just over 2*/i". Finally, divide thai line 
in half to 1^*, 

You have just sketdted the dlnieiisions of a 
quarter-wave anienna for ihe 13 centimeter 
band— 2*3 GH/, which is 2300 MHz, or 
2,300,000,000 Hz. (That's a LOT of Hertz!) 
Preny small, isn't it? 

The thrust of this introduction to the ama- 
teur microwave bands is think small. On the 
other hand, we can also think BIG while we 
think small, and FU show you what I mean as 
we move on. 

Overview 

The majority of amateurs are active on the 
HF (High Frequency) bands— that is, 160 
through 10 meters* These are the first fre- 
quencies on which n^ust operators get up and 
running. A considerable number of hams 
venture higher, to 6 meters » 2 meters, L25 
meters, and even 70 centimeters, which is as 
high as most of them will ever go. 

But to think that life ends after 450 MHz is 
grossly in error. The biggest chunk of spec- 
tnim allocated to the Amateur Radio Service 
lies above 900 MHz, where one band alone 
(23 centimeters) is larger than the combined 
bandwidth of alt allocations from 160 meters 
through 220 MHz! Thai's a lot of room lo 
play with, and the room is largely empty most 
of the time. 

For whatever reason^ the bands above 900 
MHz are underused b> most amateurs. Could 
it be ignorance? Reluctance to spend money? 
Little or no understanding of propagation at 
these frequencies? Probably a combination of 
all three! Well, grab your hats and come 
aboard for a short flight over the ** Uncharted 
Terriiories*' as we unravel some of the mys- 
teries of microwaves! 

The 902 Mill (33 Centimeier) Band 

Compared to its higher*frequency cousins^ 
33 cm is just coming into adofescense. Yet 



it's a *'bot'* band of late, with a preponder- 
ance of schematics for prcamps. converters, 
transverters, and amplifiers shos^ing up in 
numerous publications. The ai location is ac- 
tually from 902 to 928 MHz, but for the 
moment most activity is taking place near the 
low end of the band, between 902 and 904 
MHz. 



''. , . (23 centimeters) 

is larger tiian the 

combined bandwidth 

of all allocations from 

160 meters through 

220 MHz! '' 



A half- wavelength at 33 cm is roughly ^^A " 
long, making designs of high-gain antenna 
arrays quite simple. Two popular yagis are 
(1) Conventional half- wave element types 
and (2) Fuh-wave loop designs. As I men- 
tioned earlier, thinking "small"' allows us to 
think **big/* w^hich translates into multt- 
wavelength booms for higher forward gain 
and fairly narrow beamwidihs. 

Since 33 cm lies just above the cellular 
telephone frequencies, much surplus cellular 
equipment has been modified (or stripped for 
pans ) and incorporated into amateur stations. 
Many semiconductors developed for cellular 
operation are easily obtained at a reasonable 
price, and a number of designs based on com- 
mercial power miJdules have sprung up in 
amateur microwave newsletters. 

At the moment, there are no manufacturers 
in the USA or Japan with a line of amateur 
transceivers for this band- There is a mobile 
citizen's radio service in Japan which uses 
low-power FM equipment in the 900 MHz 
range, and perhaps some of these units will 
make their way across the Pacific. Currently, 



only SSB Electronics of West Germany, 

and LMW Electronics of England, manufac- 
ture linear transverters for 33 cm. Both mod* 
els accept all modes (except ATV) and 
run about 20 and 6 wans output respectively, 
using a 144 MHz IF. For ATV buffs, 
PC Electronics of California sells a 33 cm 
transmitter with the capacity for audio sub- 
carrier. 

Propagation at 902 MHz closely resembles 
that found on the 23 cm band (1240^1300 
MHz). Radio waves at this frequency propa- 
gate line-of-sight and are largely limited by 
atmospheric attenuation. Obstacles such as 
densely foliated trees, large buildings and 
hilly terrain, can become formidable obsta- 
cles to the average 33 cm signal! The quanihy 
of precipitation in the air can also degrade 
communications. 

For the average home station running 5-10 
watts to a single loop/dipole yagi« communi- 
cations from 25 to 50 miles can easily be 
reached with smooth terrain. The fun begins 
when atmospheric conditions form tempera- 
ture inversions, layers of cooler air trapped 
between layers of warmer air. This phe- 
nomenon creates something approximating a 
"duct"' (such as that in air conditioning), and 
33 cm signals entering the duct may come 
from hundreds of miles away. 

Such paths have occurred from the central 
states to the northeast, across the Golf of 
Mexico, along the Atlantic coast, and even 
from Hawaii to southern California. While 
the path from Hawaii to Los Angeles has been 
worked on all bands from 144 through 1 296 
via iropo, it remains to be done on 33 cm. As 
of this writing (7/10/88), the record for a 902 
MHz contact is 623 miles, between Texas and 
Florida. 

The 1240-1300 MHz (23 Centimeter) Band 

Of all the bands above 900 MHz, 23 cm is 

probably the most accessible at present. It's a 
worldwide allocation (unlike 33 cm), and 
many transverters, transceivers, antennas, 
preamps, and amplifiers are available for it. 
For those inclined to homebrew, circuits 



14 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



GET YOUR BEARINGS STRAIGHT 





Af last! A map dedicated to the radio amaleur. Announcing the Azimuth-Equidistant wall map tfom 
kihe Great Circle Map Co. 

An azimuth map provides information about heikifng and range to any place on Earth. Mo longer will 
you have 10 guess a1 which way to aim youi beam antenna for that rare DX. 

Each map is specially drawn with your station at Ihe exact center. The rest of the world is spread out 
around you To use the map. simply find the target station and read the compass heading Irom the border 
of (he map. To find Ihe range, count the number ol rings from the center. Edch rir>g is spaced \ 000 miles 
opart. Voila! You rtow know the true heading and range to the targei station. 

The maps are custom drawn with computer accuracy for your location and are personalised with your 
St ai ion's call sign at the lower right. Each map measures 33*^x23", is brightly colored, and Is printed on 
high quality potSler stock making ft S4jctable for framing. 

To order, send S39 check or money order and your station's call sign and location (if you live in a Jarge 
city, state which skieol town) to; jf ff tfjti jT 

vJrc Jf vircU '* I )^pSL a. 

P.O. Box 69 1 40 ! • S^n Antonio. TX 78269 






• Automatically erases memory 
and rapidly charges NiCad 
batteries up to 15 Volts. 

• Allows batteries a long life 
with maximum capacity. 

• Helps restore a tired battery. 

• Full 2 year warranty, 

• Cost effective, saves money. 

• Ponce de Leon never had it 
so good. 




Control Pr-oductia Unlffnl^«d« 



CmCLE 34§ ON f^EADEH SEHVICE CARD 



\« 



5 Somerset Or,, Coatesvihe. PA 19320 
(2 15J 383-6395 





The Advanced Radio Devices (ARD) R9100 is the heavy duty antenna rotator designed for the big gun with antenna loadu to one 
ton. All componenta are designed and aelected for durability and long life, a quality often over looked. 

The control syttem provides both analog and digital readout of direction to within ±1 degree. Proviiions for external computer contml 
which allows rotor positioning by the mere keyboard entry of a target country Is prefix. Software is provided for use with most 
popular computers. 

This qualily rotor is the most capttbk and powerful unil designed for the amateur market today, You can pay more and get less. 



SPECIFICATIONS 
Rotating torque: 10,000 inch lbs. 
Braking torque: 24,000 inch lbs. 
Vertical load: 2000 lbs. 
Mast sises: 2.0 to 3.5 inch CD. 
Motor 1/3 HP 
Rotation speed: 1 RPM 
Weight: 230 lbs. 
Si£e: 14,3x25x15,1 inches (wlh] 




^»™i»» 'in m 





Write for complete specs and 
installation information 



Distributed Exclusively by EEB 




Orders: 800-368-3270 



Local & tech info 
703-938-3350 



Electronic Equipment Bank 

51 6S Mill St. NE, Vienna, VA 221 80 

(just minutes from Washington ^ DC) 



73 Amateur Radio * October* 1988 15 



abound to help Ihe ham get up and running in 
a hurry. 

23 cm has been in the allocation tables for 
quite a while* and a detailed band plan exists 
.supporting a variety of tnodc^. including 
packet, SSB/CW, ATV, and satelliic opcra- 
lioo, A half-wavelength at 23 cm is about 
4^^", making the design of high-gain yagis 
quite easy. Many 23 cm designs have been 
scaled down to 33 cm with excellent rcsuhs, 
and so I id -state amplifier designs for 23 cm 
have also been used this way. 

23 cm is also pan of the Enhanced Novice 
alkwation, and this, coupled with the popu- 
lariiy of the band overseas, has led to a major 
commiimem by the large manulacturers to 23 
cm transceivers, Kenwood. ICOM, and Yae- 
KU all manufacture FM handhelds and mobile 
radios for 23 cm, while ICOM and Yaesu also 
make multi-mode base station transceivers. 
On the transverter side, SSB, LMW, and 
Microwave Modules ail make high-perform- 
ance equipment. SSB and Down Easit Mi- 
crowave sell a full line ol sulid-staie 
''bricks'* (amplifiers). Antennas arc avail- 
able from KLM, Tonna, La r sen, 
J-Beanu and Down East. PC Electronics also 
makes a nice 23 cm ATV unit. 

Moi>nbnunce (EME) operation is quite 
popular on 23 cm, partly because a high-gain 
array of yagis (or even a dish) diK^sn't take up 
much room. Many weak-signal operators 
artjund 12% MHz are running some truly 
monster arrays. How about four 55-element 
yagis on an H-frame? i Imagine running 220 
elements on 2 meters!) Propagation is very 
^similar to 33 cm, with everyday communica- 
tions possible over a 25-50 miic path on 
smooth terrain. 

Tropt)spheric enhancement can produce 
spectacular results on 23 cm. During the June 
1988 VHP Contest, daytime SSB/CW 
coniacis from the eastern shore of Virginia to 
New York City. Long Island, and South 
Jersey, produced signal levels in the_S-l 
to S-3 ranee. However, at about 9 PM, the 
same signals were literally tA) dB over S-9 
due 10 tropospheric enhancement. The rea- 
son? The ocean cools off faster at night than 
the shore areas, and tropo **ducts" were 
formed. 

From late summer through luie fulL tropo 
enhancement can often occur many miles 
inland. A tremendous opening in late 
November 1986 resulted in hundreds of 1296 
contacts between stations in New York, 
Pennsylvania, and Ohio, and stations in 
Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas, In many 
cases, both sides were running under 1 watts 

output to mtHlest antennas testimony to 

the power of a tropo opening! 

The 2300-2450 MHz 
(13 Cenlimeler) Band 

13 cm has been coming into its own lately, 
with a general upswing of interest along 
the East Coast, centra! Midwest, and South- 
ern California. A ha If- wave length at )3 cm is 
Just 2,5". making the construction of a 
conventional dipole-elcment yagi somewhat 
difficult. Here is a band in which dish an- 
tennas stun to lo<ik more attractive, but \hc 



ever-present loop yagis are quite practical 
aswelL 

All mtxles are permitted on 13 cm. but the 
most po(>ular are SSB and CW weak-signal 
work. 13 cm is also used for remote FM links 
and control lines in areas where high moun* 
tains offer linc-of-sighl paths to urban areas* 
and telephone lines would be impractical. 
Satellite operation is now available with the 
addition of a 1 3 cm downlink from Phase 3C, 
using a beacon at 2400.325 MHz and a Mode 
"S'^ uplmk/downlink from 435.600 to 
2400.700 MHjt. 

13 cm tends to be an cxperimcnter*s band 
due to the lack of commerciaHy-manufac- 
tured amateur equipment. Only two compa- 
nies make iransvcrtcrs for this band— again, 
SSB Electronics and LMW Electronics. 
Another stumbling block lor potential 
builders is the lack of linear solid-state 
devices for power levels over [ watt. Mosi 
designs adapted from commercial or military 
devices rely on 26-volt supplies and ground- 
ed-basc bipolar transistors. As such, they run 
Class C only, but this is not a problem when 
operating CW. 

The limitations of low power are more than 
made up by larger antenna arrays, such as 4 to 
!0 foot dishes or multiple-bay loop yagis. A 
flv in the ointment is the considerable losses 
incurred in convent ional transmission lines at 
this frequency, as the dielectric tends to ab- 
sorb RF energy. Most serious 13 cm opera* 
tors use H '' hardline, and even it has moder- 
ate losses at this frequency. 

Despite the drawbacks, propagation at 
2300 MHz can be extensive, A modest station 
running 1-2 watts to a 20 dB antenna 
should be able to work about a 10 to 15 mile 
radius from the home station. Longer paths 
can be worked during pcritxls of enhance- 
ment, and a well -equipped station running 50 
to i 00 watts to a 20-23 dB array might be able 
to work over 200-300 miles if conditions 
are right. 

Precipitation poscsa major hurdle, as large 
raindrops or snow (lakes tend to reflect or 
refract the signal away from its intended re* 
cipient. Indeed, many 13 cm operators work 
each other along panially-obstmcted paths, 
taking ad^^antage of consistent refraction by 
nearby hills or buildings. Stations have even 
worked via ^'airplane scatter*^ where the sig- 
nals have used a 747 passing overhead as a 
reflector. This technique has also been tried 
on 23 cm. 

The 3300-3500 MHz (9 cm), 

5650-5925 MHz (6 cm). 

and I(HKK>-IO5O0 MHz (3 cm* Bands 

Here is some truly uncharted territory. 
Talk about available spectrum space! The 
3 cm band alone is bigger than ALL amateur 
allocations through 13 cm. These are truly 
the "millimcter-wave" bands, with a full 
wavelength at 10.000 MUi (or !0 GHz) mea- 
suring just over I inch. As might be expected, 
construction of conventional yagis would be 
all but imptissiblc here, so waveguide and 
feedhoms are the preferred method of trans- 
mission, cither direcliv or to illuminate 
a dish. 



Virtually anything can send a signal 
from these bands astray: A bird flying in front 
of a dish, tall buildings, vehicles, dense 
rainelouds or foliage* These are literally 
*Mine-of-sight" frequencies. Power genera- 
tion at these frequencies is not an easy 
task. Most stations are typically running 
under 1 watt, often at less than one-tenth of 
I watt. 

Two mt>des predominate here: Wideband 
FM, employing Gunnplexers or similar Gunn 
diode oscillators, and narrowband CW/SSB, 
using transmit^neceive converters with inter- 
mediate frequencies at 144 MHz. Virtually 
all of the equipment used on 9 cm and 5 cm 
is homebrewed, while there are at least 
two commercial units on 3 cm, the SSB Elec- 
tronics Microline Transverter, with about 
100 mW output, and the previously- men- 
tioned Gunnplexers, with 10 to 20 mW 
output. 

Signals can also be enhanced by tropo- 
spheric effects (although to a far lesser degree 
than on 903 and 1296). The record for a 
2-way 10 GHz path was set frotn the coast of 
Spain lo an island in the Mediterranean Sea — 
a path entirely over water. In this case, the 
ducting was used as an extended waveguide 
to gel more mileage out of the milliwatt signal 
levels. 

Summary 

The frequencies from 900-10000 MHz 
represent a vast resource that lies largely un- 
tapped by all but a small percentage of ama- 
teurs, yet nowhere else in the spectrum do we 
have the space to run virtually all modes with 
little or no QRM, and minimal interference 
from inclement weather. Although high pow- 
er levels arc harder to obtain, higher gain 
antennas more than compensate. 

This ''trip'' has been by no means conclu- 
sive! I have pui-posefully neglected the bands 
above iO GHz due to the limited scope of this 
article* If you are stimulated to try operation 
on one or more of these bands, I suggest you 
obtain copies of the following puhlieations: 
(1) Pie ARRL Handboi^k. I9«S Hdition. (2) 
The VHF/UHF Manual, by G,R, Jessop, (3) 
Vie Fmceedtngs of the 1987 Central Suites 
VHF Society Conference , (4 ) Tlie Proceed- 
ings of Microwave Update *87, atul {5) Pro- 
ceedings of the Mid-Atiamic VHF /VHF Con- 
ference. All are available from the ARRL 
Publications Dcpt. 

You may wish also to subscribe to any of 
the numerous regional newsletters that detail 
UHF and microwave operation. Three good 
choices would be the Midwest VHF Report^ 
published by Roger Cox WBODGF. 3451 
Dudlcv Si, Lincoln NE 68503; VHF/UHF 
and Above ^ published by Rusty Landes 
KA0HPK, PO Box 126, St. Mary of the 
WiKKis, IN 47876: and Feedpoim, published 
by the Nonh Texas Microwave Society, c/o 
Wes Atchinson WA5TKU, Rt. 4, Box 565, 
Sanger TX 76266. Another newsletter, 
which has sonic excellent circuit ideas from 
time to time, is Cheese Biis^ published by 
the Mt. Airy VHF Radio Club, c/o Harry 
Slein W3CL. 2087 Parkdale Ave. Glenside 
PA 19038 



16 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



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73 Amateur RBdio ■ October, 1988 17 



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10 GHz Polaplexer Transceiver 




A unique system for full duplex operation on the 3 cm band 




The construction of the polaplexer 
transceiver was prompted by W60YJ 
and oihers who needed circulators for their 
own projects. A very simple 10 GHz 
transceiver could be built but required a 
circulator, a hard-to-find and expensive 
component. The point wc were trying to 
accotiipiish was an inexpensive aliernaiive 
that could provide excellent performance and 
an easy construction project. This approach 
goes back 30 to 40 years and involves many 
amateur's efforts, including W61FE and 
W6V1X. Ed W60YJ's design is quite simple 
and uses only one out-of-the-ordinary 
component — aTctlon^"^ rod. 

Required Campunent^ 

The shopping (junkbox) list includes a 
Gunn diode, a short section of WG-16 
waveguide, brass shim, i/l6" brass rod, and 
a I " piece of Teflon™ rod. Those with their 
own Gunn oscillator will not need the Gunn 
diode. I used a Sol fan intrusion alarm Gunn 
oscillator that I found ai a burglar alarm com- 
pany. The power output of this unit normally 
is 5 to 10 mW. After substituting a higher 
power Gunn diode, however, the unit now 
produces 100 mW output, 1 was able to obtain 
a large quantity of high power Gunn diodes 
for 6. 10. and 18 GHz operation. You can 
easily find the remaining pieces in most local 
well-stocked hardware stores or at the local 
swap meets and surplus dealers. The high 




TEFLOM 
TRANSFORMER 



rO.D. 0.&30' f.D. 
Bi^ASS TOILET 
RlSEf? PIPE 



Figure I. Cut-away profile of the circa far wavcg 
uide, wirh the Tefloff^ piece inserted. 

20 73 Amateur Radio * October J 988 



byCL Houghton WB6IGP 




power Gunn diodes I have made are available 
for amateur radio construction. I will make a 
kit of these components available to those not 
able to locate them. 

Easy Design 

The design of the polaplexer is very sim- 
ple. It uses standard plumbing brass tube 
found in a batKroom water closet as an over- 
fill pipe. The cost of these pipes is about 
$2.50 in most hardw^are stores. One end of 
the tube is fitted with a waveguide tlangc, that 
is turned out on its center to fit the outer 
diameter of the l" brass pipe. Through this 
flange is where the Gunn oscillator attaches. 
This cati take several forms, including the 
familiar intrusion alarm microwave units or a 
homebrew Gunn oscillator made out of a 
piece of WG-16 waveguide. In cither case, 
the oscillator is coupled through a Teflon™ 
transfortner which is positioned just inside 
the mounting flange on the inside of the 1 " 
brass tube. 

The Gunn oscillator serves both as the 
transmitter and injection oscillator for the 
detector mount. The transmitter is frequency 
modulated by varying the power supply 
voltage. On receive, a small portion of the 
oscillator power is coupled into the detector. 
The difference frequency. 30 MHz in this 
case, is detected by the mixer diode and am- 
plified by the following IF stage. The sensi- 
tivity of this polaplexer is quite competitive 



with a good circulator and performs quite 
well. It is especially good when used with a 
quality low-noise detector diode, I use a Mi- 
crowave Associates (M/A COMM) 
1N23WG with a maximum noise Figure of 
6.5 dB. 

Approximately 30 dB of isolation between 
transmit and receive is achieved due to cross 
polarization in the circular waveguide. When 
using a polaplexer, offset the unit 45 degrees 
from true when working vertical Gunn units. 
The conveniion is to rotate the receive off 
vertical towards the right when facing the 
distant station. When operation is with other 
circular units, no offset adjustment is neces- 
sary. See the system photographs and Figure 
1 for details. Add to this package a simple 
regulated power supply of about 10 volts DC 
w ith an IF amplifier operating at 30 MHz for 
the detector IF output and you are nearly 
ready to put this system into operation. 

Making The Flange 

The heart of the system is a 5 13/64" 
section of brass tubing. I first mounted the 
tube into a flange that was prepared by open- 
ing the I by Vi" normal rectangular to a full 
circular to accept the 1 " brass tubers CD in a 
slightly tight lit. 1 used a lathe to cut open the 
waveguide flange, and fashioned a square 
piece of brass plate with a center cut hole to fit 
the r' tube. 

After assembly, polish the finished flange 











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Figure 2. Two views of the drcular waveguide. The left diagram shows ihe top view, with the square figure 
in the center as the detection flange. Vie right diagram shows the end view. 



and joint end surface on a flai surface wi^h a 
fine piece of 400 grit sandpaper to make the 
flange's fit tight and unifomi. Place the paper 
on a small piece of glass scrap to maintain the 
flat surface when polishing. For home-brew- 
ing flanges, I suggest using 3/16- to 1/4 '' - 
thick brass plate. After checking for good fit, 
remove the rear flange for attachment. 

I then removed a short section of wave- 
guide with the flange attached to serve as the 
detector mount. This section of waveguide 
need be only about !4 " long, extending out of 
the back of the flange. Cut one off from some 
scrap piece of waveguide with the flange at- 
tached. File the end of the waveguide to fit the 
curvature of the outside of the brass tube, 
taking care to align the waveguide length 
parallel to the tube length. Mount the flange 
centered 2 9/16" (2.5625") from the end of 
the brass tube. The center measurement is 
from the inside of the waveguide- See Figure 
2 for placement of the detector flange on the 
brass tube. 

Detector Construction 

With hard silver, solder the short piece of 
waveguide to the side of the brass tube. Make 
sure to remove any solder that flowed inside, 
so the inner surface is a smooth transition 
from brass tube to waveguide— excess solder 
is quite messy. The primary reason for using 
hard silver solder is so it will stay intact when 
other parts are soft-soldered to the polaplcx- 
er. Don't ruin a careful and time-consuming 
alignment with quick construction methods 
and soft solder! Also, place moist paper towel 
into parts of the soft-soldered to keep exces- 
sive heat from dcsoidering them. 

Verify the alignment of the half-finished 
assembled polaplexer after the silver solder- 
ing operation. Tf in good order, remove the 
brass tube inside the waveguide fitting by 
drilling some of the center material away, 
Fine-flle to keep from scoring the waveguide 
itself. Caution: Do not remove the small edge 
lip of the brass tube as it extends into the 
inside of the flange for 0. 150" on either side 
of the inside of ihe waveguide fitting, 0.9" 
length side of waveguide. See Figure 3 and 4, 
inside of waveguide detail . 

Detector Vanes 

Now prepare the brass vanes for insenion 
into the waveguide opening. The space is an 
equal distance across the width of the detector 
coupling. Fit them with a section of brass on 
the top section J approximately 0.4" by 0. T'. 
All parts are made from brass shim stock 
about 0.0 IC thick, I prepared the parts by 
cutting ail components and trimming them to 
fit. I then made a jig, with small pieces of 
wood scraps J to hold the two vanes in position 
while 1 silver soldered the two top pieces 
together. I soldered the top of the vanes to the 
bottom of the top plate (0.4 by 0. T') using a 
small amount of silver solder to tack the 
pieces together. 

Once the vanes were fitted in, I cleaned up 
the part by removing excess solder, and begin 
fitting it inside the flange for good fit. It 
requires patience, since it will more likely 
move the vane pan during soldering. File to 



± 



O.IQO 



k 



fit the scale shown in Fig- 
ures 3 and 4. The vanes are 
soft-soldered into the 
waveguide for a final fit. 
After ail other operations 
are completed, set them 
aside for the time being. 

Detector Pins 

See Figures 1 and 2. Four 
holes are now drilled into 
the brass tube. The first hole 
is located OJO" back to- 
wards the end of the tube 
from the center of the at- 
tached waveguide detector 
mounting flange. This hole 
point is centered on the 
brass tube and is perpendic- 
ular lo the axis of the detec- 
tor flange. Make sure the 
drill press does not wander 
and that the hole drilled is 
centered and uniform on both sides of the 
tube. I used a 1 / 1 6'' bit in my drill press and a 
short section of angle bracket to hold the 
brass tube in a bench vise while drilling, 

f used a small guide drill about 0.030" to 
ensure that the holes are centered where I 
want them. It is not necessary to drill through 
the material— it just provides a guide. I avoid- 
ed center-punching for fear of scoring the 
material. 

The other three holes are 0.25" center-to- 
center apart from the first pin. 1 tapped the pin 
in with mild force as the brass rods were a 
tight fit. I suggest cutting off the excess with 
wire cutters, since bending to hold in place 
distorts the inside position. Soft-solder both 
sides of each pin to the outside of the brass 
tube. Note that a tight fit keeps excess solder 
out of the inside of the circular waveguide. 

Injection Screw 

The oscillator injection screw is mounted 
45 degrees offset from the perpendicular 
plane line of the detector flange of the 1/16" 
pins. A 6-32 screw is insened into the guide 
to act as the injection coupling into the detec- 
tor mount. It controls the amount of oscillator 
power to inject into the detector di<KJc. It's 
located 3 9/16" from the rear flange. See 
Figure 2. 

Mount the rear flange to the tube with its 
bolt holes aligned to the oscillator unit. Make 
sure the wide internal section of waveguide is 
in the same plane as the 1/16" pins below the 



0.900 



O. 40O'-pJ 



1 



■0,704 



0.02S 

TO FIT TUBE 

WALU THICKI>4ESS 






TOP PLATE 
12 REO'D} 



VANE 
12 REtfm 




VANES AND TOP PLATE 
ARE 0.0 10 SHIM STOCK 



HARD SOLDER 
BOTTOM OF TOP 
PUITE TO TOP OF 
VANE ( TACK- 
SOL DEF^l 



SOFT SOL PER VANE 
AND TOP PLATE TO 
fNSlDE OF DETECTOR 
FLANGE FLUSH WfTH 
1.0. OF BRASS TUBE 
tMOUNTAS LAST JTEMl 



END VIEW 



OBLtOyE VIEW 



Figure i. Details of detector vane mounting. 



detector mount. Then soft-solder the rear 
Oangc. As a last point, soft-solder mount the 
vanes to hold them more firmly in place. 

Operation Modes 

The input end of the brass pipe is actually a 
circular waveguide and is operating TE-11 
mode. To this flange the Gunn oscillator is 
attached. Use a home-brew job or a surplus 
Solfan oscillator. The orientation of the 
flange and the Gunn oscillator is in respect to 
the four pins centered in the circular wave- 
guide. They are parallel to the broad face of 
the Gunn oscillator I" wide opening (0.9" 
inside dimensions). See Figure 2, Both 
flanges are bolted together in normal opera- 
tion through the four bolt holes located in the 
corners of the flanges of the Gunn mount and 
the circular waveguide flange. 

Teflon™ Transformer 

The neat trick required at this point is 
coupling the rectangular waveguide to the 
circular waveguide. The key player is a one 
inch stock piece of Teflon™ rod, which is cut 
to fit inside the circular waveguide flush with 
the end of the flange. Build the Teflon"'" trans- 
former by milling or drilling a series of cuts 
and depressions in the front and rear face. 
This accomplishes ihe required transforma- 
tion from rectangular (TE-IO) to circular 
waveguide (TE-l 1) mode. Its operation can 
best be explained one of two ways: A dielec- 
tric lens through which the microwave ener- 




Fhoto A. Rear view of polaplexer showing Teflon™ 
transformer and four hrasspins on the side of a I " 
tube. Detector mounted on polaplexer. 




Photo B. Test circulator with short section of circu- 
lar waveguide. It couples the noise generator to the 
eircular waveguide w allow the evaluation of the 
polaplexer. 

73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 21 




Photo C Completed potapiexer mount with Soifati 
Gunn i/sdiiator auuched. 

gy is forced to travel mid arrives after go- 
ing through the insulating material, in a 
oew relationship \n respect to the origi- 
nal signal {plain old obfustication), or just 
simply black magic! I prefer the latter expla- 
nation, 

N6IZW, experimenting Just for fun. insert- 
ed a solid hard rubber ^r^^ baU in the open end 
of a radiating waveguide, its shape made it 
behave like a lens or magniiying glass which 
gave (a little) gain to the microwave signal. 
It collimaies ihe microwave energy into a 
focused point due to the different travel times 
through the dog's ball. 

Tenon™ Tooling 

Machine the Teflon'"' transformer to fit 
inside the brass tube. The transformer resem- 
bles a handle-less beer mug with a hole 
drilled through the center of Jis bottom. It 
should be 0.843" long and about 0.930" wide 
to tit snugly inside the circular wave- 
guide brass tube. Differcni suppliers have a 
slightly different wall thickness in their brass 
tube, so cut to fit the individual tube. 




I" ORASS TUBE 



TOP S/IE* 

StlOW1fl(3 hNSIDE DETAIL OF 

TUBE CUT-flWAY. NqTE HEMMHlhlG 

TABS IHSIOE *G'FLAM<*E 

p/o esAss Tuee. 




r BRASS TUBE 



TOP VIEW 

VAhlES INSERTED INTO 
WG FLANGE 




Photo D, Ed W60YJ on Mt. Soiedad, using the 
poiaplcjcer, Sol fan Gunn oscillator, and home- 
brew SO MHz receiver. Ed is looking through a 
borc-sight tube mounted on the dish. 

The center of the Teflon™ is drilled with a 
0.218" diiimeter hole (13/64" drill bit = 
0.203") through the Teflon™ center. One end 
of the Teflon''" transformer is machined out. 
centered on the 0.218" bore, a 0.750'^ wide 
cut 0/031" deep. The other end of the 
Teflon^" transformer has a similar cut 0,684" 
wide centered and 0.450" deep. This gives a 
.simple transition between rectangular wave- 
guide (TE 10 mode) and circular (TE 11 
mode) . 

With care, machine the Teflon™ piece on a 
lathe, i made a perfectly adequate trans- 
former on a drill press using bottom cutting 
bits for the inside depressions in the Teflon™* 
Use the center hole of the Teflon'"" trans- 
former as a guide placed over a wood dowel , 
pinned to a large board fixed to the drill table. 
Using a small end bit, as a mill turning the 
Teflon^" part on the pin, will control the cut in 
the soft Teflon™ as to depth and edge cut. It 
takes some time, but works quite welL Fix 
the position of the board with one or two 
clamps to hold the position securely while 
turning the Teflon™ part. Use safety glasses 
and care when working with any power tools. 
See Figure 5 for dimensions on the Tellon™ 
transformer. 

Detector Mount 

Refer now to Figure 6. A detector mount 
using a low noisic M/A COMM 1N23WG 
diode attaches about halfway forward on the 
brass tube to the detector flange. Cut a hole 
through the brass tube inside the detector 
flange 0.4 '^ by 0.704" after the flange 
is hard-soldered to the tube. The detec- 
tor mount can be a surplus mount or can 



L 



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0.843- 




0?50 
930 



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ooao 1 

DO 3 1 44 



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0A2^ 




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218 0.466 

r 



-*-0450- 



1 



^^ 123 



TEFLON 

TRANSFORMER 



be built out of a short piece of waveguide. 

Gunn Oscillator 

It is not important what Gunn oscillator is 
chosen, all that is needed is a source of 10 
GHz energy. 

1 used one of the Solfan !0 mW oulput 
oscillators on my first home-brew project. 
Set the oscillator near the frequency of inter- 
est, say 10.250 GHz, and attach the Gunn 
oscillator to the rear flange. Couple to the 
detector flange the diode detector. Make pri- 
mary adjustments with a current meter in 
series with the crystal detector. Adjust the 
depth of the coupling screw (6/32) to obtain 
about 0.8 mA as indicated on the series me- 
ter, then lock the screw in position. Coupling 
the detector to an IF strip provides a complet- 
ed full-duplex transceiver. I normally have a 
single stage low-noise pre-amp between the 
detector output and IF input. I use a single 
U-310 FET in grounded gate, feeding one of 
my single chip receivers operating at 30 MHz 
(T DA -7000 Signelics chip). 

Best DX So Far 

The best DX using one of these units with 
a two foot dish was about 1 10 miles to Heaps 
Peak from Mt. Soledad in San Diego by 
W60YJ. Ed was using one of my TDA- 
700() IF amp receiver boards operating at 
30 MHz, approximately 70 kHz bandwidth. 
The construction of workable microwave 
transmitters and receivers is not magic— 
they can be built at home with a limited 
workshop. 

Kit 

I have a kit of raw materials to build this 
polaplexcr mount for those not able to find 
them locally. The kit includes a short section 
of WG-16 waveguide, a piece of Teflon"^*^ 
rod, 1/16 brass rods and shim stock for the 
vanes. Cost is $7.50 post paid. Also available 
is a 50-100 mW output Gunn diode tested at 
10,250 GHz for $5 post paid, or both items 
for $ 1 1 postpaid from the author. Other Gunn 
diodes tested with output of 100 mW and up 
are $10 each. 

One fmal piece of advice: Get the RSGB 
Handbook. It*s an excellent authority on 
microwave, a source 1 wouldn't be without. 

I would be glad to answer any questions 
concerning this project Or any other mi- 
crowave related items. For a prompt reply, 
please include a SASE. Sec you on 3 cm! 



0.400 




BASE TO GF?OUN0 
\H BRASS gLOCK 
SNUG FIT 



It^SDLATEO aUSHlNO 



IN23 &ETECTOR 
MOUNT 



Figure 4. insertion of the vanes into the waveguide 
flange. 



Figure 5. Cut-away profile of a Teflon 
transformer. 



Figure 6. Side view of circular waveguide showing detector 
mount. 



22 73 Amateur Radio • October. 1983 



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2Neoao 


f 25 


MRFS17 


56 00 


2um%\ 


aoo 


MRF421 


24 00 


2Neoa2 


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MRf422 


36 00 


2N6083 


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2SCt307 


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1S.00 


MRF453 


YSOO 


2SC1947 


9 75 


MRf454 


t4.00 


25C19G9 


3.00 


MRf4SS 


11 75 


2SC2075 


3.00 


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2SC2097 


2000 


JUIRf4G0 


44 00 


2SC2166C 


3.50 


MRf47^ 


3O0 


2SC2290 


1675 


MRF47& 


2.75 


2SC23!2 


4.95 


MRF477 


11 75 


2SC2509 


^00 


MRF479 


10 00 


2SC2630 


28 00 


U^A%%WKIM 


leoo 


2SC2640 


1500 


MRF492 


fEOO 


2SC2641 


1600 


MRF497 


1425 


2SC2«79 


2200 


MRFS1S 


250 


3N204 


200 


MRF555 


300 


3N21 1 


2,00 


MRF60 7 


2 50 


40502 


7,50 


MRFft30 


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OUTPUT MODULES 


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15.00 


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31 00 


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10 75 


SAVt2 


23 50 


WRF837 


225 


SAV15 27;«Kz 


4S00 


MRFa43 


22 SO 


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use 


MRF$46 


37 75 


M57737 SClOtg 


SAV7 


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MRf90l 


1 as 


MHW710-2 3 


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MHWa20'2 


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MRF966 


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73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 23 



tl 



J 



Humticr 8 O^ yciur F^cdbacfc card 



VHF/UHF Tape Antennas 




VHF/UHFco. 



antennas 



by Fred Graham WB3KCZ 




Antenna experinienialion and 
consiruction on the 144 
MHz. 220 MHz. and 440 MHz 
amateur bands is often cheap 
and convenieDt due tu the^e fre- 
quencies* shon wavelengths. One 
such simple beast is the tape 
antenna. 

An Idea Is Born 

I often sketch antenna designs 
on large engineering graph paper. 
Frequently, I had to recalculate 
and r^raw the designs to visualize 
how certain modifications would 
affect antenna operation, [t was while draw- 
ing a design for a 440 MHz antenna that I 
reafized that the actual dimensions of the an- 
tenna were fitting on my graph paper. 
Voila! — if I could rcpktcc ihc pencil lines on 
the paper with a conducting material, I couid 
test the antenna with a transceiver aod easily 
trim and adjust it for best results. 

The Materials 

Narrow, adhesive-backed copper foil tape 
used in making stained glass, available in 
hobby shops, was the perfect choice, When 
the antenna is laid out on clear Mylar,™ ac- 
etate» or polyester sheets, it can be pinned to 
the wall or ceiling for testing. Modifications 
are easy to make with an X-acto knife and 
soldering iron. 

The clear plastic sheeting. 0.003"' to 
0.005" thick, is usually available at art supply 
stores, I found I could buy roHs 12 feel long 
and 40 inches wide. These dimensions al- 
lowed me to experiment with full-sized, mul- 
ti-element antennas for two meters. 

The following describes a simple folded 





Materials 


BNC Female to 




^*P' Male Adapter 


Radio Shack jfl'278-256 


Copper Foil Tape 


'^Venture Tape" 


! 


Venture Tape Corp. 




30 Commerce Road 




Rockland, MA 02370 ' 


, 


(617)'871-5964 


Plastic Sheet 


Mylar.™ Polyester. Acetate, etc. 




NTC Plastics 


TV Matching Transformer 


International Model A-MTTS-aOO 



dipole antenna for 2 meters that can be 
mounted, for venical or horizontal polariza- 
tion, either on the wall or ceiling of the shack 
with push-pins. It has a professional appear- 
ance. Since the folded dipole has a balanced 
input impedance of 3(X)Q, I used a TV match- 
ing transformer lo convert the unbalanced 
52n output of my handheld lo appro?cimately 
300Q at the antenna. These small transform- 
ers work quite well up to the 5 watt level ami 
can be us^ at 440 MHz. I have not tested the 
transformers beyond 5 watts, but I have load- 
ed them with 300Q carbon resistors at 440 
MHz, and measured virtually no loss or re- 
flected power. 

Not Alwavs 'M92/P' 

The resonant physical length of the antenna 
will vary according to its proximity to the 

wallboard material on which it is mounted. I 
have found that mounting ihe antenna on 
'*Dry WalT' requires about a 20% shortening 
of the element fnmi the value given by the 
expression: 492/f (MHz). If the antenna is 
suspended in free space it will only have to be 



C 



n 



J 



An(»nna mo'urtteil on Od3" polyeflter tshe^l 






3E 



111?' 

Itwn 
copper 



Si^fi* 09111 

Salter n w i ^fnef Itidf tovneflna leedpcuni 

SMMr foil CitFSS-iJiMMi il Wtdil Ol MtBtVU. 
Support trBnsJDrmiBr and IcedliTie with cbN* damp or la^w 
Um pu^hpjn^ or lips 10 moMrl anl^nna on waPl E»Brd, 
PaAdpQini csnle-rfl{] ai rniddle orelemoni (1B 7^'}. 



B»iC io 'F" tfaiMr 



Figure /. Two meter copper fail /aided dipole^ 



shortened slightly, i.e. 5%, to 
compensate for the dielectric con- 
stant of the plastic material on 
which it is mounted. The dimen- 
sions given in Figure 1 arc for an 
antenna constructed on polyester 
sheeting 0.003'* thick, mounted 
directly on *"Dry Wall'* wall* 
board. 

Although the antenna's length 
has to be adjusted for proximity to 
the waliboard, its operation is not 
otherwise affected. The transmit- 
ted and received signals will show 
dramatic improvement over sig^ 
nals with '* rubber duck'' antennas. Take care 
not to mount the antenna near any hidden 
AC power lines inside the wall. The feedline 
to the matching transformer can be any length 
of RG/58 or RG/59 coax, preferably with 
BNC connectors at each end. Buy an adaptor 
to convert the BNC connector to the 'F" 
style connector on the matching transformer. 
Better yet, use a cable with a BNC on one 
end and an "F*' style on the other— this saves 
both the cost and the electrical losis of the 
adaptor. 

The folded dipole e;<hibits wider band- 
width than a single conductor dipole— it's 
possible to cover each of the 144, 220, and 
440 MHz baiKls with a single antenna. 

Folded di poles with other than 300Q feed 
impedances are easily built by varying the 
width and spacing of the dipole conductors. 
The copper tape Is available in widths from 
5/32 " to ^ '' . The ARRL Amenm Bix^k gives 
details for various folded dipole feed 
impedances. 

Antennas In The Works 

I am presently working on versions of the 
J-pole, vertical phased array, and log period- 
ic antennas for wall mounting on thin plastic 
sheets. I am also considering different meth- 
ods of supponing these antennas and giving 
them rigidity so they can be hung from the 
ceiling and directionally rotated. 

Conclusion 

These twonliniensional copper tape anten- 
nas are vcr>' easy to put together. They 
provide an inexpensive and convenient way 
of experimenting with interesting antenna 

configurations to use in the VHF and UHF 
amateur bands. The TV matching transform- 
ers work very nicely as broadband 4: 1 balun 
transformers up to 5 watts, and at frequencies 
as high as 900 MHz. Have fun!| 



24 73 AmBteuf Radio • Octobef, 1988 




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73 Review 



by Pete Putman KT2B 



SSB Electronics LT- 

902 MHz Linear Transverter 




Transverters Unlimited 

Box 1 78 

New Boston, NH 03070 

(603)547-2213 

Price Class: $600 



The 33 centimeter band (902-928 MHz) is 
to many amateurs today what 1296 MHz 
was 20 years ago: uncharted territory with lots 
of potentJaL The increased availability of com- 
mercially-manufactured equipment for 23 cm 
has taken away much of its mystery. SSB 
Electronics of West Germany has been m the 
forefront of supplying such equipment with 
their now-famous LT-23S linear transverter. It 
stood to reason tinat when 902 MHz became 
availabfe, tliey would follow up with a similar 
unit, the LT-33S. (Photo A.) 

Both the LT-23S and LT'33S share many 
things in common, not the least of which is 
overall appearance. The same housing has 
been used with a slightly modified front paneL 
From left to right, rocker switches control LO 
selection, TX, and Power On. A meter has 
been included to show relative output power — 
unlike the LT-23S it is illuminated, which is a 
nice touch. 

Rear panel connections are also similar; 
BNC input for the 144 MHz IF. BNC input for 
the 902 MHz receive input, and a type N con- 
nector at the output of the PA board. Note that 
(as on the LT-23S) no T/R switching is includ- 
ed and an antenna relay must be added- SSB 
also bri ngs + 1 3.8 VDC out to a separate bind- 
ing post which activates on receive and drops 
out on transmit. This scheme, incidentally, 
protects mast-mounted preamps, though I still 
encourage using a sequencer instead. 

Most of the circuitry in the LT-33S derives 
from the 1296 MHz unit- The major difference 
Is in the final amplifier which incorporates a 
pair of Philips ON4284 devices in parallel, as 
opposed to the LT-23S which uses 2 BLU99s 
in the same configuration. Amplifier operation 
is m Class AB1 mode, grounded emitter for a 
truly linear signal. What goes in comes out, 
whether it be SSB, CW, AM, or FM. 

The final amp now uses ON4284 devices 
because the BLU99s kept failing at 902 during 
high VSWR stress tests. Conversely, the 
ON4284 does not have significantly more gain 
than the BLU99 at 1296; hence the two differ- 
ent types of finals in the two transverters. The 
good news is that the 902 final configuration 



. c S^^^^^^^H 




■^ 


- l^^^H 










'' /^S 



Photo A. SSB Electronics L T-33S 902 MHz 
transverter. 



produces over 20 watts output saturated, 
which ^s a good amount of drive when using an 
outboard tube amplifier-. It's also plenty of 
power for QRP work as well. 

The front end device is an active RF am- 
plifier using the time-honored Mitsubishi 
MGF1302, rated at about 1.3 dB noise figure. 
Early models of the LT-33S ran only 6 watts 
output and a lesser-quality GaAsFET was se- 
lected for the front end. The consequences of 
this were low gain and poor compression per- 
formance! The MGF1302 works much better 
In this regard, making the unit slightly more of 
a "bunny rabbit" than an "alligator" (more 
ears than mouth). 

As on the LT-23S» a 1 44 MHz IF is the stan- 
dard configuration, although you can special- 
order 28 MHz IF frequencies. The use of a 144 
MHz IF allows for better filtehng of the LO 
signal. With a 28 MHz IF, it would fall at 874 
MHz and be considerably more difficult to fil- 
ter out than if a 2 meter IF was used. In this 
case, the LO would be at 758 MHz and is 
easily trapped out. On-board resistors allow 
drive with up to 12 watts to interface with the 
popular multlmode radios, most of which run 
1 watts or have adj u stable power output . 

Practice shows that a lower drive level re- 
sults in more linear operation. Typically, 1 to 2 
watts drives the transmit mixer and the output 
is clean and stable. An adjustment for drive is 
available near the power resistors and it should 
be set just below the point at which the output 
saturates — typicafly in excess of 20 watts. 

Performance 

i used the LT-33S extensively during the 
ARRL January VHF Sweepstakes with a 
Down East Microwave 33 element loop yagi at 
about 45 feet. The feedline was 9913 (what 
else?) and no external power amplifier was 
used. It is certainly a challenge to work DX on 
a band where activity levels are low and most 
contacts are made with schedules. It's even 
more of a challenge with 20 watts, but the 
LT*33S came through with flying colors. 

From my location in FN20, central Bucks 
County, 22 contacts were made In 6 different 
grid squares. Several were long-haul to FN42 
(W1RIL) and FN32 (WAIMBA). There were 
many CW schedules and the LT-33S heard 
them all after some jockeying of the rotor box. 
No external preamp was used, and I'm not 
sure one is needed with the stock setup. 
Should an external amplifier be used, howev- 
er, it might be worth considering. 

One problem {if it could be called that) was 
extensive warbling of the signal (also called 
FMing), due to LO instability, I attribute that 



instability, however, to poor voltage regulation 
caused by too much of a voltage drop in the 
DC power leads from an Astron RS-7 supply. 
This was confirmed in on-the-air tests with 
K2SMN and WB2WIK, so the power leads 
were cut to 2 feet. The problem completely 
disappeared! Another cure tor this condition 
on the LT-23S has been to re-route the coax to 
the final amplifier with a pair of 90 degree BNC 
connectors around the LO crystal (I'm not 
sure why that latter problem should have ex- 
isted in the first place, but the fix works 1 00¥ej.) 

The LT'33S was also used on the ARRL 903 
Spring Sprint. Its smafi size and ease of 
switching are well suited to portable operation 
and grid-hopping, With a storage battery as 
the power source, it would be an excellent 
idea to disconnect the lamp from the power 
output meter to save on current drain. Such 
radios as the Yaesu FT-290R are Ideally suit- 
ed for portable IF stages. By using a coax 
switch and a small 2 meter beam, schedules 
can be quickly coordinated and completed. 

SSB Electronics also makes a 902 trans- 
verter kit, using the UEK-3 and USM-3 mod- 
ules (RX Mixer and TX Mixer). This combina^ 
tion uses a great deal of the circuitry from 
the LT-33S and the output stage Is a BF034 
running about 5 watts. The advantage of 
this scheme is that it allows customization 
of a transverter housing and antenna/DC 
switching. 

Conclusion 

The SSB Electronics LT-33S is a wel^-de- 
signed and engineered linear transverter for 
ail-mode operation in the range 902-906 
MHz, The front end exhibits excellent sensitiv- 
ity and the power output is more than ade- 
quate for external amplifiers or straight- 
through operation. It is ideally suited for 
portable and/or contest operation, which should 
encourage more 902 MHz grid-hopping!l 




Photo B. In tenor v/evi^ of ttie LT-33S. This view 
looks down at tiie IF board^ The PA fs on the 
rear wall. 



73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 27 



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Number 10 on your Feedback card 



Portable Re-entrant Cavity Two 

Meter Antenna 



Rubber duck portability with quarter-wave performance i 



f 



by Don Morgan W7A CI 



This article describes an application of 
Tucker's design which resiihs in ihe 
most satisfactory two meter portable antenna 
this author has ever used.' Wh;ii makes the 
design so aiiraclivc is that it can be easily 
slowed for iravel. yet is a significant im- 
provement over a duck or a quarter-wave 
vertical. In addition, itdoesn^t require radials 
or a ground plane. A possible disadvantage in 
the minds of some might be thai, because 
tuning is required^ a visual readout device is 
called for. 



N0t Much To It 

This system is a half-wave vertical fed 

by a resonant cavity. By visuatizing the 
radiator turned to the horizontal . and an 
open wire quarter- wave transmission line 
substituted for the cavity, and a coax feed 
line uipped in at the 50Q point on the open 
wire line, you can see the classic Zepplin 
antenna design. 

The cavity is simply a tin can (coffee or 
dog food can recommended) approxi- 
mately 5-^6 inches high by about 3 inches 
in diameter. These dimensions are much 
shorter than a quarter-wave, but the an- 
tenna w^ill be capaciiively loaded to reso- 
nance. After painting the outside (only) of 
the can a color of your choice, bore or 
ream the proper holes for a coax bulkhead 
connector. One and one-half inches up 
from the btHirun is about right. The center 
rod is made from any collapsible whip 
which will extend to 44 or more inches. It 
should be attached to the bottom center of 
the can, either with the whip-mounting 
screw (some whips come with this), or by 
soldering it with some son of bracket. 
Tucker recommends a UG-177/U hood. 
Whenever attempting to solder to chrome 
plated brass, it is best to sand off the 
plating first. 

Before installing the whip section, 
mount the 50 pF capacitor (see Figure 1 ). 
Wc used an air variable cap. but a piston 
trimmer might do the job if the transmit 
power is very low. The cavity is a high-0 
device capable of developing some sur- 
prising voltages. Don*t use compression 



and ceramic irinmiers because their configu- 
ration maJccs hand capacitance unavoidable 
while making adjustments. We designed this 
antenna to use with an HT — if you use more 
than a few watts, don't place \aur tinge r in 
the opening of the can while transmitting. 
Doing so exposes yoii to a zap and severely 
detunes the cavity. The outside is ''cold" at 
all times. 

Use an SWR bridge for initial tuneup. The 
three variable quantities to optimize are: the 
tap point of the feed, the capacitive loading, 
and the length of the whip. A tap point about 
one and one-half inches up from the bonom is 
the place to start. Extend the whip to 38 
inches above the top of the can. While feeding 



5B \f\. OR m\ 

At OPERATING 
FReOiJE»<CV 



1 



-© 



® 



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I'tTI'l' 



:":^ 



— © 



a OR 6 m. 



c^ 



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I UZ in 



^ 




Figure f. Configunnkm for tht* rv-tiu ram cavity emtmma, 
Pfjitits A-F are: M-htpafjL, SOpFtap. . SO-239hood, coax 
Jiuing, coffee L-an. rap pom (clamp or solder^. 



RF into the cavity, tune the variable capacitor 
to about half mesh and watch die SWR meter 
drop to near zero. Kit doesn^t, move the tap 
point up or down a fraction. Once the correct 
tap pom has been found, it will thereafter 
remain fixed (soldered or clamped) and the 
variable aiKl whip section can be returned to 
prc-markcd positions each time the antenna is 
extended for use. 

I prefer, however, to retune the capacitor 
with some son of readout device, such as a 
neon bulb or RF sniffer, because it is quite 
critical. A germanium diode across a 50 or 
100 microammeter makes a dandy sniffer. 
Merely tune for maximum meter deflection 
(output). Again. Tucker stresses that good 
bonding of the capacitor rotor to the 
cavity is an absolute must to avoid hand 
capacity, A short length of coax from 
the cavity to the transceiver completes 
the job. Weighting the can or using 
magnets and a plastic lid are possible im- 
provements. 

Light Comparison 

A low-powered handheld using a rub- 
ber duck antenna was positioned in front 
of a field strength meter (set at maximum 
sensitivity ) to make the meter read exactly 
full scale. The distance between the duck 
and the meter measured 17 inches. The 
antenna described in the text was then 
substituted for the duck, and the prtKC- 
dure was repeated. The distance for a full 
seatc reading increased to 27 inch<^. The 
square of the ratio of the two distances* 
convened to dB. is a fair indication of the 
*'gain'* of the half-wave vertical. In this 
case, the half- wave indicated about a 6,7 
dB improvement. 

U you like to build things that produce 
outstanding results, this project is for 
you, 



Reference 

L William Tucker W4FXE, *^Re-cntrant 
Cavity Antenna For the VHF Bands/* 
appeared in May 1981 \s%ug of Ham Radio 
Magazine (pp. 12-25) and treats the sub- 
ject in substantially greater detail. 



73 Amateur Radfo • October, 1988 29 



Number 11 on your Feedfcjacic card 



73 Review 



by Pete Futman KT2B 



W2DRZ 902 MHz Linear Transverter 
Module and Sequencer 



Tightwad's way to get on 33 cm. 



VHF Communicatfons 

915 N. Main Street 

Jamestown, NY 14701 

716-664-6345 

Prices: W2DRZ 902 MHz Transceiver $299.00 

1 44 MHz 30 Watt Attenuator/posl amp S49.00 



I've been saying it alt along; You don't nec- 
essarily have to spend an arm and a leg to 
get a signal up and running on 902 MHzf 

How nice to be able to substantiate that 
daim wtth the W20RZ 902 MHz transverter, a 
professionalty constructed unit that will take 
less than 1 mW of drive at 144 MHz and yield 
nearly 3 watts output. 

Photo A shows the main transverter board, 
and It's a very compact layout. Note thm the 
transverter is sold withoul a case. This 
saves the buyer a few bucks and allows cus- 
tomization when installed. But the unit is com- 
plete, requirmg only 13.8 VDC, a 2 meter 
transceiver, and a coaxial relay to switch the 
antenna between transmit and receive. In ad- 
dition, an external PC board serves as a power 
attenLfator and IF posl-ampHtier so thai 144 
MHz multimodes can be used as the IF 
source. 

Let's take a look at the lineup: The local 
oscillator employs a 2N51 79, running at 94.75 
MHz. This is then doubled to 189.5 MHz. then 
doubled again to 379 MHz. The output at 379 
MHz is fed through a inlerdigltal filter and dou- 
bled one last time to 756 MHz. This LO signal 
is taken from a second interdigital filter to 
knock down harmonics and is injected at 
about +7dBm. 

The 2 meter IF source comes in through a 
10 dB resistive 50O pad. In theory, the user 
will employ the outboard attenuator board and 
reduce the input signal to about 10 mW at the 
IF input. This means only 1 mW of drive is 
required to drive the mixer, which is a Mini 
Circuits SRA-5 diode ring mjxer. Being a pas- 
sive dbde ring mixer rather than an active 
type, it exhibits some conversion loss, but has 
high dynamic range-a typical characteristic of 
diode mixers. 

The output is ted through a PIN diode switch 
anuy and then to a CGY21 power GaAsFET, 




Photo A. Top view of fhB W2DRZ 902 MHz 
linear transverter. TX/RX connectors are to 
the feft, and 144 MHz fFm/OUT to the right 



devefoping about 8 dBm at 900 MHz. To mini* 
mize spurious outputs, a Toko 3 section heli- 
cal filter follows the CGY21 , This filter has a *3 
dB bandwidth of atx)ut 15 MHz, ensuring a 
clean signal. Incidentally, all units come tuned 
for a 902 MHz center frequency, but can be 
easily retuned for operation higher In the 
band. 

The buffer, driver and flna( amplifiers are 
located after an on-board 50Q relay which 
switches low level TX and RX signals. A sec* 
ond CGY21 provides about 22-25 dB gain 
and m turn drives an MRF557 to about 500 
mW output. The final device is an MRF839. 
developing 2 watts across 50Q. This latter 
device can actually make up to 5 watts output, 
but begins to compress at about 2.5 watts. 
W20RZ suggests running no more than 2 
watts to run aciean, linear signal. 

The receive section is simple: 902 MHz sig- 
nals are fed through the on-board 50Q relay to 
the same CGY21 used as the first low-level 
amplifier, then back through the SRA-5 mixer. 
That's it! The manufacturer claims a 5 dB 
noise figure for the CGY21. As a result. 
W2DRZ strongly recommends a good low- 
noise GaAsFET ahead of the receive input, 
preferably with about 15 dB gain or so. But as 
you'll see momentarily, the power GaAsFET 
gives a good accounting of itself. 

My initial tests with the unit were done with 
no chassis enclosure. This transverter doesn't 
seem to care where it*s set up. . the output 
remains constant and the receiver is quite sta* 
ble. If you've had your fill of unstable LOs, or 
oscillating receiver sections, this will be a wel* 
come relief! To obtain output. I initially used an 
HP608F Generator (with Boonton 92 to mea- 
sure input levelsj and a Bird 43 with a 5 watt 
400-1000 MHz Slug and 25 wall Termaline; 

Performance Measurements 

Linear Output Power 
Input Level Output Power 

-1 dBm 700 m W 

-7 dBm 1.5W 

-4 dBm 3.0 W 

-3 dBm 3,5 W 

-2 dBm 4.0 W 

*1dBm 4.5 W 

OdBm 5.0 W 

(NOTES: * — Transverter is in compression 

arid non-linear at 3.5 walls output. 

** — Transverter heavily saturated at 5 watts 

output) 



As far as the receiver performance goes, I 
was not able to make detailed tests as my 
signal generator cuts off at 450 MHz. so in- 
stead I relied on over-the-air observations, 
specifically with the IM3CX beacon on 903,080 
MHz 25 mites distant. Comparisons were 
made against an SSB Electronics LT33S 
which has a sensitive front end and noise fig- 
ure of under 1.5 dB, 

The W2DRZ Transverter held its own very 
well against the LT33S, which is impressive 
t>ecause the front-end comparison is between 
a small-signal low-noise GaAsFET (MGF 
1402) and a power GaAsFET (CGY21)! Based 
on my results, it would appear that the noise 
figure of the W2DRZ unit is probably closer to 
2-2.5 dB and not the 5 dB claimed by the 
manyfaclurer; which was understandably 
done to be conservative! 

A 12-1 5 dB GaAsFET ahead of the W2DR2 
unit would probably result in a very sensitive 
front end with high dynamic range, as the 
power GaAsFET/diode mixer combination 
saturates at about -12 dBm input. This would 
result in a 1 dB compression point of about +6 
dBm output, which is excellent by any stan- 
dard! What this means to a 902 user is relative 
immunity from front-end overioad by UHF TV 
stations or other nearby high-power RF 
sources, and the resultant IMO products. 

Conclusions 

In alL the ratings for the W2DR2 902 MHZ 
transverter are quite conservative. The output 
of 2 watts is sufficient to drive a gain block to 
20 watts, which is plenty of power for everyday 
work. Since the unit is linear, SSB, CW and 
FM modes can be used. The receiver is sensi- 
tive enough out of the tiox for everyday work, 
but a modest low-noise preamp wilt make a 
difference. The overall construction quality is 
excellent, and the modular system approach 
makes completing your 902 station a snap. It's 
a winner! 




Photo B. The accessory sequencer board fleft) 
and attenuator/postamp board (right), A 30 
watt 2 meter muttimode maybe used as the iP. 



30 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



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32 73 Amateur Radio • October. 1988 



Number 12 on your Feedback card 



The Pee Wee Thirty Transceiver 



A compact 30 meter CW/AM QRP transceiver (Part II) 



by Dan Eggert A C9E 



After completing the assembly and pow- 
ering-up of the rig, check the followitig 
lis! of key point receiver voltages. Use circoit 
ground as a reference point for these mea- 
suremenis. I used a 12.5 volt source to estab- 
lish these tbl lowing voltage values. 

L Cathode of ZD 16.5V 

2. Cathode of ZD2 6.5V 

3. Pin 5 of IC 1 3.7V 

4. Pin 8 of IC 17.5V 

5. Pin 6 of IC2 11.8V 

6. €41 -h9.9V 

Your measurements should be within 15% 
of these. They help spot a major construction 
error right off, and could save you from a lot 
of grief! 

Next, after putting out the fires and clear- 
ing the smoke, align the FF stages. Builders 
with access only to a frequency counter can 
use the BFO as a 455 kHz signal generator. I 
used this simple alignment procedure on one 
of my rigs, and it worked very nicely. 

As shown in Figure 7, remove the wire 
from switch S3B that comes from €24 on the 
drcuit board, and connect it across a 10k 
potemiometer to ground. Connect a O.OlfjF 
capacitor on the wiper of the potentiometer. 
With the BFO turned on (switch S3 to CW) 
and a frequency counter connected across the 
potentiomer, adjust T8 for 455 kHz. T8 was a 
fairly touchy adjustment on my rigs, so try to 
get it as close to 455 kHz as possible. Use the 
BFO's front panel control for fine tuning. 
You now have a crude, but adequate, signal 
generator with a variable output attenuator 
for 455 kHz! 

Remove the wire from S3B that comes 
from the cathodes of D3 and D4 on the circuit 
board (again see Figure 7), Connect a 10k£2 
resistor and about a 1|jF capacitor in parallel 
frtjm this wire to ground. Con- 
nect a voltmeter across the re- 
sistor and capacitor, and set it 
up to measure 1 volt DC. Remove 
the wire from S2 that comes from 
ZDI on the circuit board to 
disable the local oscillators. Ad- 
just the receiver's gain control 
potentiometer for maximum sen- 
sitivity. 

[>uring the IF alignment, make 
sure that the signal source stays 



on, or as close as possible to, 455 kHz. 
Throughout the alignment, always keep the 
signal generator's output at a level enough to 
adjust transformers* T3, T4, and T5 for a 
peak of about 0.75 volts on the voltmeter. It 
may also be necessary to lower the receiver 
gain during the alignment to maintain the 
0.75 voh peak. With a 455 kHz signal source 
connected at the output of T4 (gate of Q4), 
adjust T5 for a peak on the meter. Move the 
signal source to the output of T3 (the gale of 
Q3), and adjust T4 for a peak on the meter. 
Move the signal source to the output of T2 
(gate of Q2), and adjust T3 for a peak on the 
meter. 

Repeat the alignment of T3, T4, and T5 
again, but keep the signal source ai the out- 
put of T2 (gate of 02). Use the highest re- 
ceiver gain setting possible, and the lowest 
signal source input level that is needed 
for a peak of 0.75 volts on the meter. Re- 
connect the wires previously removed from 
S2 and S3, and restore the circuit to its nor- 
mal configuration. Check the local oscil- 
lator(s) by placing a frequency counter at 
ihe circuit connection of R4, C5, and the 
gate of Q2. 

For the tunable versioti, switch the tunable 
Qscjllator on and adjust T7 for the proper 
front panel tuning range desired (RX fre- 
quency is 455 kHz), or just simply play 
around with this adjustment with an antenna 
connected to the rig later. Preset trimmer 
capacitors C13 and C14 to mid-range. With 
Ihe crystal oscillator switched on, adjust T6 
for the frequency of the crystal selected. The 
best way to align T6 is to use a scope at this 
test point and adjust T6 for a peak output. 
Builders without an RF signal generator for 
the receiver alignment can peak Tl and T2 
while receiving a weak signal with a fairly 
constant signal strength. The peak in T 1 is not 



FfiOM C24 



METER 



FRONf Q3gDA 



.DiMf 



tOk >*^ 



COUHTEfl 



TO 

TEST 

POINTS 




■^ 



lOk 



1u1 



Figure 7. Frequency counter and volt meter connections to aid receiver align 
menL 



sharp, however, and it is somewhat hard to 
recognize. 

On one of my rigs, T2 peaked ai a point 
where the tuning slug almost bottomed out. 
To avoid this^ solder a very small -value ca- 
pacitor across the primary of this transformer 
on the solder side of the circuit board if neces- 
sary to lower the tuning range. 

If you didn't use the BFO as a signal source 
for the receiver alignment, then adjust T8 for 
a BFO output frequency of 455 kHz with the 
BFO tuning control at mid-range. If you used 
an RF signal generator for the receiver align- 
ment, and a frequency counter was not ob- 
tainable, then inject a 455 kHz signal through 
the IF stages and adjust T8 for a zero beat 
when in CW mode. The receiver should now 
be ready to tune in the world! 

Transmitter tune-up is very simple. With 
the rig connected to a wattmeter and dummy 
load, adjust the oscillator trimmer €5, and 
then the output trimmer €11 for maximum 
output power. Repeat the adjustments again 
for maximum output. Adjust the crystal trim- 
mers C2 and C3 for the desired crystal output 
frequencies with a frequency counter, if 
available. 

With the transceiver on a dummy load and 
keyed, adjust the receiver's crystal trimmers 
C 1 3 and C 14 so that the side tone heard in the 
receiver is the same with either frequency 
selected. 

Conclusions 

The rig design is basic, but most itnprove- 
ments would involve a lot of extra construc- 
tion and redesign. My main goal was to 
develop an inexpensive, simple, and fun-to- 
operate rig. 

It's quite possible to work good DX oti the 
Pee-Wee 30— i just recently received an S-7 
report from a ham on the Caribbean island of 
Grenada. QSOs like these are 
very satisfying on a QRP home- 
brew rig putting out only about 
two watts. QRPing is a joy to the 
ham who truly likes a challenge. 
Join the fun! ^ 

The component kit, including PC 
board, is available for $95 frotn 
Hobby Electronics, PO Box 
44247^, Denver, CO 8020 L Ask 
for kit #H7300t. The PC board 
alone is available for $35. 



73 Amateur Radio * October, 1988 33 



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Number 1 a on your Feedback card 



Passions of the Ether 

Hams and their reasons to he 



by Steven K. Roberts N4RVE 



It is a rare treat for a writer to contempiate a 
blank screen on the eve of deadline, trying 
to get in the mood and feel the audience then 
suddenly realize that with every reader he 
shares a single potent passion. Ham radio is 
more than a mere vertical market— it's obses- 
sion, religion, and lifestyle of choice for a 
diverse scattering of technoid humanky , This 
touches me with something approaching 
poignance. spawning a temporary departure 
from the usual theme of this series. 

Actually, what started all this was a sort of 
inlrospeciion, the kind of analysis that ac- 
companie<; any personal expenditure of man- 
years and kilobucks. Why am I doing this? 

Growing Pains 

As you have probably noticed from my 
recent articles about the Winnebiko. my 
high-tech nomadness is getting out of hand. 
The OSCAR Mode L station is now under 
construction; I can operate 80- iO HF while 
camped and 10-6-2 FM-SSB-CW while ped- 
aling; the bicycle-mobile packet station in- 
cludes a BBS; and Tm seriously considering 
trying ATV with a Sony 8mm video system, 
Bath bicycle trailers are being rebuilt with 55 
watts each of additional Solarex PV modules, 
and Fm using Tedlar'" substrate material 
with a bonded shielding layer to build a dedi- 
cated pop-up operating position for the whole 
lightweight "shack/ ' The 70- and 23'Cm OS- 
CAR beams break down and ride in a foam- 
lined drawer under the trailer, the extendable 
mas! supports five different anrennas and a 
preamp, and in addition to all this, there are 
expanded computer systems, nav/ map ping 
systems, a voice-data-fax cellular phone with 
answering machine, and much more. 

So what madness drives me to dedicate all 
available resources to a gizmological tour de 
force that, put crudely, merely lets me travel 
around in slow, high-risk discomfort while 
chatting occasionally with fellow techies? 

I staned pondering this question as a sort 
of iniellectual background task last month 
while visiting WA40NG in Richmond. Jim 
is building a new house, and we rented a 
U-Haul to pick up his new HO-foot Rohn 
55G tower a hundred miles north at EEB. 
He's looking for a few hundred feet of fiber- 
optic cable to control an all-band IC-900 at 
tower-base from the house. He just set up 
an all-mode satellite station with the largest 
possible beams, another tower, and fully- 
automatic AZ-EL tracking and transceiver 
tuning under control of a dedicated PC. This 
same ham also operates a busy 4 -port packet 
BBS with online CD-ROM call director>^ 
and extends his coverage with a remote site or 
two, Why does he do it? 



"Well, there's a bit of the anarchist in 
me/* he said. **In fact, it irritates me to 
register my tower with the FAA/' 

As I write this, Fm visiting another Jim— 
AB4CZ in Norcross, Georgia. We're parked 
in his driveway in our temporary mother ship 
(a 35-foot school bus that lets us make the 
rounds of manufacturers, clients, hamfesis, 
and trade shows while hustling books and 
working on the new bike system), I sit here 
keytapping in his driveway, my fingers danc- 
ing to the rhythms of Bob James, while our 
host pursues the passion. I see him up there 
clambering across the steep roof, risking his 
life with a sore back to replace the 3/8-wave 




20-meter vertical with a new beam, dropping 
another run of coax along the fat bundle that 
already links his coven ant- stretching subur- 
ban antenna farm to a room full of equipment. 
His bride of two weeks attempts to involve 
him in domestic activities, but he will have 
none of it this afternoon. His eyes are gleam- 
ing with radio waves. Why? 

**I feel a strong pride in my ability to com- 
municate over long distances. All my life I Ve 
really loved radio, . . *' 

Everywhere we go it's like this. Rooms 
papered with QSLs, relations with neighbors 
strained by skyhooks, budgets reeling under 
new gear^ late nights digging through QRM 
in the quest for a ZA or an SU, impromptu 
on-air gatherings dedicated to quantifying the 
incremental improvement in somebody's 
audio hams across the land are crazy with the 
urge to communicate. 



What Makes Radio Special? 

The computer hobby was like this during 
its short life in the70's, but as it matured from 
wirc'W rapped 8008s to the epoch of software 
superstores, it quickly evolved from toy to 
tool. When I found my dear old BE- 
HEMOTH plastered with tax charts and 
schedules, something happened to the thrilL 
Computers have become like oscilloscopes 
and milling machines: tools of exquisite 
beauty, gateways to other passions, high-tech 
chameleons that change color and form with a 
whim and a keystroke. 

Perhaps the computer hobby was prevent- 
ed from reaching amateur radio proportions 
by a device technology that packages insane 
complexity into untinkerable modules— 
a technology that either works or doesn*t^ 
offering none of the tweakings and mysteri- 
ous RF tricks that we hams both love and 
hate. 

But ah, radio. What e!se can span cultures, 
thrill us with raw power, enchant us with 
magic while puzzling us with complexity, 
challenge the intellect, satisfy the urge to 
compete, dazzle onlookers, serve the public, 
guarantee a circle of friends, reward in pro- 
portion to effort, offer security in strange 
places, bring out the anarchist lurking within, 
offer a constant flow of irresistable new toys 
to keep the checkbook depleted, and tie it all 
together with a tingling undercurrent of fun? 
What else could drive me to further burden an 
already-overloaded bicycle, something I 
swore Td never do? What else could make 
you browse this issue of 73 and lust after 
boxes. Birds, and Butternuts with all the 
tight-chested urgency of youthful desire? 

Go on, admit it. You concoct elaborate 
justifications, but your purchases and 
projects are based on passion. 

OK. Let*s pin h down. What kind of pas- 
sion? The more I travel among hams, the 
more T see a discrete set of motives lying 
behind the mad pursuit of signals through the 
ether. How many of these basic ham-types 
apply to YOU? 

The Anarchist 

In these days of insane politics, candidates 
of dubious motives, terrorists, scattered 
mini -wars, and earnest discussions of mad 
Star Wars pursuits, it is tempting to dedicate 
energy to the elimination (or at least the 
avoidance) of governments. Forget your na- 
tiouBilism for a moment and join me in a quick 
fantasy . , . . 

We're cruising the Galaxy in a starship, 
and broad-spectrum electromagnetic activity 
with a higher-than-normal autocorrelation 
function suggests life on a blue-green planet. 

73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 35 



Discreetly we hover, all sensors on. Initial 
conclusion: a single inierl wined ecosystem, 
dominated by a single inlclligent species. 

Looking closer and extracling meaning 
from the jumble of transmissions, however, 
we begin lo observe that the planet is criss- 
crossed with boundaries, sonic following nat- 
ural geographic features, others imaginary. 
Different abstract regions, rH>puIaledi by the 
same species, spend 10-20% of every indi- 
vidual's income on the tools of warfare. Hu- 
nmas crossing imaginary tines can be har- 
rasscd. searched » taxed, imprisoned, or 
killed. Artificial trade restrictions exist, 
raising the overhead of living. 

Radio waves have no respect for borders. 
When they are wielded by humans who feel 
likewise, ihe result is a refreshing sense of 
freedom from the artificial constraints of 
governmental policy. Even though an Ameri- 
can ham can't ask an Irish ham tn call a friend 
in Dublin, the capability is there: even though 
there are places w here ham radios are consid- 
ered spy equipment, ii*s good to know that if 
it all hits the fan, we amateurs will be there to 
help knit humans together. Every new sta- 
tion, be it a packet BBS or a 1 .2 Gig HT, adds 
to the general ability of our species to keep 
itself from dissolution. 

The Sur^ivalLst 

Closely related to the Anarchist is the 
Survivalist, but the motives are more person- 
al, less related lo politics than preparedness. 
We have recently seen the effects of massive 
single-point failure in communication sys- 
tems, when that switch in Illinois crashed and 
left thousands without information links. 

There is genuine satisfaction in owning 
equipment that will work when commercial 
services arc shut down by disaster, war, or 
economic collapse- This Is one of the plea- 
sures of my bicycle, in fact, Not only does all 
the equipment run on solar power, but so does 
the bike itself. The personal effect of an 
American in formation/power /fuel disaster 
would be softened by the presence of radio 
systems that keep right on working under 
natural power, assuming that no NEMP has 
come along to blow away all my chips. 

The World Citizen 

Culturally « ham radio can be described as a 
global door-opener. Peace and understanding 
among various aggregates of Eanh's citizens 
depend more on communicatiofi than any- 
thing else (something fully realized by loiali- 
tartan leaders who do their best to prevent it). 
We have been conditioned to believe that 
difference means danger, that at any level of 
magnification, world affairs reduce to a para- 
ooid "US versus THEM" formula. 

Politics aside, the easiest way to fix this 
illness is to simply cunimunicate ( interact! ve- 
ly» not just by snatching the occasional PBS 
documentary about the rituals of Zambian 

if 

natives or Russian holiday fashions). Hams 
are in a unique pi>sition lo spread a demystify- 
ing awareness among their fellow citizens- 
spending hours in relaxed conversation with 
new friends worldwide, they realize that 
ihevVe not all that different* 



Talk to aliens beyond the QTH and signal- 
report level. Discover that they're not aliens 
after alL Share tho>ie insights with ethntjcen- 
tric Americans, and realize that youVc help- 
ing save the world- 

The Social Animal 

Of course, not all hams want to think 
globally. There's nothing intrinsic to a radio 
that forces its user*s mind to open. Thai*s 
OK— there are plenty of other good reasons 
to do this. 

Consider the neighborhood. If ytnirs is like 
the ones I knew be tore moving to a bicycle, it 
is a random assemblage of not- necessarily 
compatible people cast together by economic 
strata and chance. The contrasts can be 
absurd. Both Jims mentioned earlier are 
harrassed at some level by their neighbi^rs for 
antennas and unsighijy visiting nomad buses^ 
while the neighbors* goal in life is a perfectly 
manicured lawn and a clean Cadillac* 

This seems a strange way to live— lo be cast 
iiito physical proximity with those of incom* 
patible natures. It's one of the driving forces 
behind my continued wandering. 1 prowl the 
land in search of exceptions. 

The social ham, like the computer net* 
worker, hasdiscovered a solution to the prob- 
lem. When you go on the air, your neighbor- 
hmxl becomes virtual, whether the scale is 
global or repeater-wide, Y'our contact is 
brain-to-brain (not face-to-face), and the ef- 
fects are interesting. First » when it doesn't 
matter what your friends look like, you can 
make some astonishing ccmncctions. Second, 
when their location is no more important than 
their alma mater, your relationships arc not 
constrained by geography. From the folksy 
Possum-Trot net to the Sunday morning 
meetings of old friends nn 40 meters, hams 
have found ways to step nuistde the 
boundaries uf ihcir physical ncijj^hhdi hoods. 

This has led me to make my home in Datajs- 
pace, a not-iand where bigotry is obsolete and 
geography falls apart, Hams have known this 
for decades, and often see the physical reality 
of suburbia as an insignitlcam backdrop for 
their real life, instead of the mind-numbing 
trap that it can so easily Income, 

The S<icially-lnhihited 

Then there's the other side of the same 
issue. Some people dim *t have a choice. They 
are shunned. Perhaps scar tissue or deftJrmiiy 
makes them hard lor style -conscious Ameri- 
cans to face. Perhaps they^rc fat, ugly, or 
confined to a wheelchair. Maybe their speech 
is made tortuous by cerebral p;dsy *>r stutter- 
ing. Maybe they're a minority race in the 
wrong part of town—iir female and techno- 
britliant in a cuhurc that frowns on that ten- 
dency in "girls/" 

The pt>lm is, ham radio can open communi- 
cations channels while hiding whatever it is 
that makes normal socializing difricutt. 
^Mrile anonymity can be abused (especially in 
the computer networks K it can save the very 
lives of those driven into desperate loneliness 
by their appearance. 

There's a brain in every body, even if the 
face doesn't meei current standards or the 



peripherals don't all work. If you know 
someone like this, dying slowly of intellectu- 
al neglect, take the time to demonstrate ham 
radio. You may make a life worth living .... 

The Public Servant 

I've always been fascinated by diis much- 
publicized aspect of ham radio. Individuals 
build communication systems on behalf of 
society H. out of pocket, without pay* often 
taking time off from work when volunteer 
radio duty calls. It takes a variety of forms, 
ranging from building packet mail -forward- 
ing systems to manning a disaster- re lief nerve 
center, and the motives behind it are among 
the most noble of anv in our culture. There 
really are people whose need to help other 
people. e%'en strangers, is a major personal 
priority. 

Actually, there are iw-o forces at work 
here. One is the humanitarian support of 
those in trouble (or practice for real emergen- 
cies by helping at public events), and the 
other is the creation of systems that keep 
communication flow ing without cost or cor- 
porate substrate. The former is easy to under* 
sand, but the latter is not so obvious. 

What, exactly, drives a ham to spend thtni- 
sands of dollars to bring a new packet BBS 
online? I think well find that it spans most of 
the other motives in this article, from being 
the biggest digital signal on the block, to the 
seductive delights of technology, to the hope 
that all our communication eggs don't end up 
in an expensive and volatile government 
basket. When you consider the cost of such a 
station can run $10,000 or more, the power of 
the motives behind it becomes obvious. 

And what about A MS AT? The packet 
satellites going up next January will be cheap 
at abimt S40,(KH) each, and the OSCAR 13 
system just launched has been estimated at 
roughly $2 million. This not casual tinkering, 
folks, this is passion. 

The Good Samaritan 

Of course, there are thousands of low-bud* 
get hams who live far from the big projects. 
They never participate in emergency pre- 
paredness exercises, and may even grumble 
when their favorite repealer is lied up all day 
by logistical support for a lOK run. 

But these same folks would elbow each 
other aside in the rush to help a stranded 
motorist or call the police about a drunk driv- 
er. Whether it's our familiar need to help our 
fellow man, or a less-noble desire to justify 
the money spent on radios, may be hard to 
tell, but the net effect is an ad hoc cadre of 
concerned citizens with radios. 

I have felt deep satisfaction in stopping my 
bike to help stranded motorists, and though I 
am of little use tor tow ing or jump-starting, I 
can sure do something atx>ut calling for help. 

Perhaps this sort of thing also exonerates us 
a bit, making our obsession with new toys 
seem a bit less selfish . , . . 

The Sportsman 

And then there's the scoring culture. For 
many hams. DX contacts are nt>t so much 
cultural interconnections as fodder for the 



36 73 Amateur Radio • October. 1988 



coveted ** Worked More Than 100 Countries 
on Less Than 33 Warts While Ealing Burrilos 
in the Snow'* award. These contacts have a 
fonrtuta look about them, and there have been 
rumors of robot contest ops that compete 
effectively. 

Some people run contests for the glory. 
Others for the exercise. Others for a concen- 
trated dose of that enchantment that comes 
with working every new state or country' (I 
ran about ISO QSOs on Field Day as a casual 
one-delta for this reason). Some do it to re- 
ceive external, objective feedback on the ef- 
fectiveness of their station. And still otbers 
do it to add excitement to the process of 
advancing the state of the art in comniunica- 
tion techniques (collecting meteor-scatter 
grid squares). 

As with most aspects of ham radio, the 
question of motive is mired in complexity. 
Clearly, there is thrill in competition, and 
some of the more sophisticated forms of 
'Tadiosport" reward not the bucks spent on 
big guns, but the hours spent on fine-tuning 
receive efficiency and operating skills. 

The Showoff 

But some people have no such motives^ — or 
if they do, they're secondary to the ft^ing of 
an overgrown ego. You meet them occasion- 
ally on the air; it seems that every club has 
one. Outlandish claims of technical derring- 
do are always afloat when this bozo is 
around, and be careful lest you become 
drawn unwillingly into a battle of one-up- 
manship. 

Ham radio can be appealing to the egotist, 
for a new audience is only a CQ away and 
verification of lies is next to impossible. This 
kind of person cannot survive in a closed 
community, and so tums to short-term rela- 
tionships to feed the habit of trying to impress 
everyone. And with the full range of this 
complex hobby available as fodder for in- 
vented experiences, he can get away with it 
for quite a while before other hams stan 
experiencing mysterious local QRM after 
being dragged into a QSO with him. 

The nuctkal I lain 

This one's easy* and also common. There 
are four ways to sta> in touch with the world 
from your car: cellular phone, CB, buiiiness 
radio, and ham radio. The first is expensive 
and non-stKiaL but very reliable aiKl quiet 
near cities; the second is culturally useless* 
but occasionally handy on the Interstate; 
the third involves business licensing and 
expensive hardware; the fourth is easy, fun, 
reliable, and ut Tordable. I have met a number 
of hams who got their license only for the 
ability to autopatch home every afternoon 
and say* ** Honey, Fm on the way. Need 
anything?*' 

Maggie K ASZYW joined me electronical- 
ly as a condition of the high-tech nomad job. 
Getting there was a big challenge for one 
whose life had been spent far removed from 
technology, but she did it, and it has not only 
kept us in constant contact, but has nearly 
doubled our range of on-the-road relation' 
ships. Ain*t technology wonderful? 



1 would broaden this category to include 
safety, I have often pedaled into the ragged 
end of an unfamiliar city, paused by the road 
to store all the local repealers in memory, 
then pressed on with the reassurance of an 
occasional reset beep in response to my left 
thumb. 

And for some people, ham radio is all that's 
available. In the wilds of Nevada, there are 
whole communities without telephones that 
are linked together via a mountaintop 
repeater and local hams. 

The System -Beater 

Any comparison between ham radio 
and other communication links brings up 
another point. Some hams have discovered 
that routine personal long distance con- 
versation is free via radio and expensive via 
phone. That sounds like a good stand alone 
reason for getting a license, even if you're 
not interested in social Siting or exploring the 
technology. 

The Tiiikerer 

Ah, the urge. Tinkering goes with radio the 
w^ clambering goes with mountains. The 
combination of the latest ntagazines and a 
robust junkbox is seductive and irresistable. 
The acrid smells of solder and silicone, the 
warm convective flow that spells victory in 
the smoke lest, the probing touch of meter 
and scope. Graticules in the night. Dragging 
a clip lead from the clutter of your bench. 
shaking off a litter of excised caps and un- 
nanieable bits of electronic detritus from past 
projects. Stepping bareft)ot with a shout on an 
upended DIP. Ripping open padded bags 
from mailorder parts houses. Poring through 
fiea market bins, your mind a confusion of 
possibilities locked in mortal conflict with 
economic reality. Hauling your new widget- 
franius over to a friend *s house to use the 
signal generator. Making the HW-B better. It 
never ends, and never should. This is ham 
radioes essential nature, and may there never 
be a day when we all become appliance-opsf 

The Gadget Freak 

But there's another side to the love of hard- 
ware. Did you sit in the numbing torpor of 
grade school, keeping awake during the 
drone of history class by drawing magnificent 
pictures of your future laboratory? 

E>o you thrill to the IC-781, reach across 
hamfest vendor tables to feel the dials, and 
imagine your house bristling with log period- 
jcs, discones, rhombics. and helices? Do you 
periodically clean up the shack (especially 
upon receiving a new piece of equipment), 
then sit back and gaze at it all in a sort of 
marveling fog? 

if so. you're a gadget freak. You want all 
new electronic toys, and find their acquisition 
at least as exciting as their use. 

The Magician 

Early in this series, I related an event that 
took place during one of my first forays into 
HF QRP. 1 spoke of the sliced rock in the 

Virginia sunshine that pumped current into a 
box of chemicals, conjuring a few Megahertz 



of RF modulated by my wiggling fingers and 
shoved out to a wire in the trees. Across the 
ocean, 6000 miles away, a stranger heard the 
disturbance in the ether and responded. Soon 
we were becoming friends through some- 
thing best described as magic* 

Despite MaxwelFs equations and the sci- 
ences of propagation and antenna design, 
there is something arcane and wonderful 
ab*>ut radio. Computers work with digital 
perfection, cars run as long as you keep *em 
oiled, but radio waves behave on the whims 
of su[ispots« meteor trails, ionospheres and 
tropospheres. You can never know every- 
thing iibtiui it, and thus there are always sur- 
prises and confusions, wonders and delights. 
Hopping around the globe through a little box 
on your desk, hearing exotic places calling 
from deep within a tangled spectrum of voic- 
es lind carriers . this is something as niuch in 
the blood of radio as the triode-burned finger- 
lip and the ditiybop of code practice. And 
now we have EME. and OSCAR, and much 
more to keep our eyes wide with wonder as 
we refine our skills and peel away the obscur- 
ing mysteries. 

The Explorer 

For the scientist^ of course, all this trans- 
lates into invention and discovery. How 
much effective bandwidth can be crammed 
into a 5 kHz channel, anyway? Will a lot of 
spread-spectrum stations raise the noise 
floor? Which is better, a leu of directors or a 
phased array? 

How can the packet network become inter- 
woven so deeply that it becomes self-main- 
taining and invisible to the users? Can ymi 
predict tropospheric ducting? Ham radio can 
keep you exploring for a lifetime, even if 
you couldn*t care less about today *s WX in 
EA8-land, 

The Teacher 

For decades, of course, ham radio has had 
a life of its own. It has become populated 
by people of such diverse motives that it is 
increasingly hard to make generalizations. 

But some hams, in love with the spirit of the 
hobby, dedicate themselves to keeping it fu- 
eled with new blood. School programs, video 
tapes, Elmcrizing ... all this reminds me of 
Bradbury^s fahrettlteii 45 J in which people 
'"became'* their favorite books so that litera- 
ture wouldn't die under a repressive regime. 
Keeping the spirit alive is a tradition in ham 
radio, and has a lot to do with preventing the 
median age from advancing even faster than 
it diies. 

And so there we have it, A marathon 
overview of the motives that drive otherwise 
sane people to fling themselves into the ham 
radio passion. How many of these **types" 
did you recognize in yourself.^ I am a blend of 
twelve of them, and Vm sure ihat*s not at all 
unusual. 

Whatever your motives, please share them 
with others. Keep ham radio thriving in all 
p^jssiblc ways, And if you happen to see a 
couple of loonies pedaling their stations past 
your QTH. invite *em in for a beer. Cheers 
and 73 *s from the roadf!! 



* 



73 Amateur Radio • October. 1988 37 



^ 



Mumber 14 on your Feedback card 



Antenna Systems— Part 2 

W3ZC continues to dispel popular antenna system misconceptions. 

by John Lawson W3ZC 



In Pan i (Sepicmbcr 1988 7S), I staled the 
ideal of a maiched antenna siyMem— ihat 
antenna, transmission line, and tranHmitier 
ouipyl impedances arc all 500. This, howev- 
er, h not usually the case. Amateurs are not 
single frequency operators, and wc know that 
antenna impedance changes vtiih frequency 
of operation, H«w to niatch (or come reason- 
ably close lo maiching) impedances? 

Assume you have a beam and you want lo 
f^d if with 5i)Q RG^8/U coax. There are 
several faelors to take into account. First, 
coax is unbalanced transmission line— almost 
all the current travels in the inner conductor, 
with very little, if any. inlhe shield. Second, 
the driven clement of a beam is much like a 
dipole. It is a balanced antenna. It expecis 
equal currents to flow on each side of the feed 
point. With directors and reflectors, it has an 
impedance of around 15Q (dependent pri- 
marily on the elemem spacing). The prob- 
lems therefore arc to change from an tmbal- 
anced lo a balanced conilguration, and to 
match the beam impedance of 150 wiih the 
coax impedance of 50Q. 

Balun 

One way to do both of these tasks is with a 
balun (coniraciion far "balanced-to-unbal- 
anced.") This is really a transformer with a 
ferritecore. 

A 4:1 balun d(X!s bcHh jobs. The problem 
with a balun is ihai. at the band edges, e^^pe- 
cially with a wide spaced beam, the mismatch 
is high, causing the territc core lo heat up if 
you're running considerable power. There 
are alsjci enviranmcntal confide rat ions with a 
balun. The balun core can corrtxie, changing 
itschamcteristics. 

Most hams get around this by using a coil 
of coax, in which the shield acts as a matching 
stub and performs the impedance trans- 
formaiion. This configuration is almost 
entirely reactive and consumes very Utile 

38 73 Amateur RadfO • October, 1988 



power even at the band edges where 

mismatches; are usually greater- There mav 
be a space problem regarding where to place 
this coil of coax, but up on the tower it's 
usually out of the way. 

Antenna Gain 

This term lends to confuse people* because 
it implies an increase in total energy after 
going though a given antenna system. What 
gain really is, however, is a ratio between the 
strengths of useful radiation patterns of two 
antennas. These two antennas are the refer- 
ence antenna* and the antenna lo ctmipare to 
the reference, both with the same input ener- 
gy. The units are usually given in decibels, m 
dB, Note that the '*gain'* that we see is mere- 
Iv a redistribution, or rearraneemeni. of the 
supplied energy. The more the supplied ener- 
gy is concentrated into the useful radiation 
patterns, the more gain that antenna has. 

in HF antennas, a common standard of 
comparison is ihe isotropic radiatcjr. This is a 
hypothetical antenna that radiates equally 
well in ail directions. Another common refer- 
ence antenna is a half-wave dipole in free 
space, which has a liiile over 2 dB gain, in 
reference to an isotropic radiator. Us pattern 
appears from the top view as a pair of opp^)*^- 
ing ellipses, both emanating from the feed 
point. As viewed from the end. the pattern is 
circular. Some of the pattern energy is not 
useful— for example, the portion of the ficid 



















cou m 


\ 




i ==s^^l 








r 









Figure 11, Typuat haiun itsetf to hotarc a ^rmmded 
source from a load (anwmm^. 



that radiates straight up or straight down is 

usually wasted. Antenna engineen* can de- 
sign systems that take this unusable energy 
and redistribute it into the side iobes. thus 
increasing the field intensity of the side lobes. 

Beams and parabolic refleciors take this 
**concent rating" fun her. Instead of a bidi* 
rcctional pattern, as with a dipole. they fcK'Us 
the available energy into a single direction, 
attaining larger, more directive, gains, 

A word of caution. Advertisers' antenna 
gain llgures often don't lell the whole story— 
they often don't give the reference antenna. 
When you read about an antenna having a 
given gain, you don't know whether it*s in 
reference to an isotropic antenna, a half- wave 
dipole in free space, or some other reference. 
Manufacturers use different standards. Al- 
ways ask ''the gain over what?" 

Wrapping Up 

The following statements sum up this two 
part series. 

L In any antenna system consi.sting of care- 
fully selected quality components, don't 
biUher try ing to get the SWR below 2: 1 . Any 
funher work to reduce an SWR of 2: 1 on any 
coaxial line will be completely wasted from 
the standpoint of increasing power transfer 
significantly. 

2. Low' SWR alone is not proof of a good 
qualitv antenna system, or that it is working 
efficiently. Ij>w SWR with a suspicious an- 
tenna can indicate that something else is 
wrong. 

3, SWR in ihe antenna system is determined 
iuiiy by the matching condition at the antenna, 
and is noi changed or brought down by any 
maiching device, such as a Transmatch* in- 
stalled at the input end of the transmission 
line. Low SWR obtained by using a matching 
device at the input indicates that the output of 
the transminer and the input to the antenna 
syxrem are matched and that maximum power 



will be transferred. The SWR between the 
feedlinc and the antenna remains unchanged. 
4. Adju.sting any matching device placed at 
the input of the transmission fine, such as 
Transmaich, L match. T match, or the trans- 
milter output tuning, for maximum transmis- 
sion line current creates a perfect mirror or 
conjugate termination for the reflected wave. 
The reflccied wave, therefore, is totally re- 
reflected upon arrival at the transmission line 
input. The mncr gives the proper mismatch 
cancelling reactance to effect this action. The 
reflected wave is re-reflected in phase with 
the iransmilter output wave, the sum of which 
constitutes the incident power. 



^^Low SWR alone is 
m^i priMtf of a goofi 
quality uiitemia systeiti. 



99 



5. tfa suitable matching device (such as a 
TransmatchJ cancels all of the reactance de- 
veloped by a non- resonant length radiator and 
a random length feedline which is mis- 
matched at the antenna feed point, the anten- 
na svstem is resonant* the mismatch effect is 
cancelled, maximum current flow^s in the ra- 
diator, and all real power available at the f^d 
point is absorbed by the radiator. 

A. The radiator of an antenna system need 
nor be of self- resonant length for maximum 
resonant current flow. 

B. The transmission line length need not be 
any particular length. 

C» A subsiumia) mismatch at the transmis- 
sion line antenna junction will not prevent the 
radiator from absorbing aft real power avail- 
able at the junction. 

6. Re fleeted power does not represent lost 
power over that which exists in a matched 
situation, except for an increase in transmis- 
sion line attenuation losses. In a loss-less 
transmission line, no power is lost because of 
reflection. Only when the matched line atten- 
uation and the SWR are both high is there 
signiflcant pt>wer Inst from reflection. On HF 
bands using luw-kiss cable, reflected power 
loss is generally insignificant. At VHF. how- 
ever, it becomes significant, and at UHF and 
higher, ii iscriticaL 

7. Total re-reflect ion of the reflected power 
at the transmission line input is the reason for 
its not being dissipated in the transmitter. It is 
conser\'cd rather than lost. 

8. Reflecied p<iwer does not flow back into 
the transmitter and cause dissipation and 
other damage. Damage blamed on reflections 
is really caused by improper output cou- 
pling—not by SWR. Tube overheating is 
caused by overcoupling, mistuned loading, 
or both. Tank coil heating and arc-overs 
result from a rise in loaded Q, caused by 
undercoupling. With manipulation and/orthc 
addition of a matching device (such as a 
Transmatch), proper output coupling can be 
attained no matter how high the SWR. The 
transmitter doesn't "see'' SWR at alL It 



sees an impedance resulting from an SWR. 

9, Both coax and open wire feeders can 
radiate, though not to any significant level, 
by re-radiating energy coupled from the an- 
tenna due to feeder positioning, or by feeding 
a balanced amenna with unbalanced trans- 
mission line. Transmission line radiation has 
no relationship to the level of SWR. 

10. Lowest feedline SWR occurs at the 
self-resonant frequency of the radiating ele- 
ment it feeds, mdependent of feedline length, 

1 1 . SWR cannot be adjusted or controlled 
in any practical manner by varying the trans- 
mission line length . 

12, SWR indicators need tun be placed at 
the feedlinc/antcnna junction to obtain a more 
accurate measurement. The accuracy limits 
of the common SWR meters indicate that 
SWR at any point in the antenna system may 
be determined by simple calculation involv- 
ing the SWR at the point of measurement, the 
transmission line attenuation per unit length, 
and the distance from the measured point to 
the desired point, 

13, If the SWR readings change signifi- 
cantly when moving the SWR meter a few 
feel one way or the other, it indicates that 
some other problem exists and noi that [he 
SWR is varying with line length. The SWR 
bridge need mn be placed at half- wave inter- 
vals to obtain a correct reading, 

14. A dipole cut to be self-resonant at 3.75 
MHz and fed with either RG 8/U orRG 1 l/U 
will not radiate significantly more at 3,75 
MH? than at 3.5 or 4.0 MHz for feeder 
lengths up to 200 feet, providing proper load- 
ing can be attained. 

15. With the use of a Transmaich or a 
simple L or T network at the line input, prop- 
er coupling can be uliaincd over the entire 
band with any random length coax. 

16, Changing the height of a dipole above 
ground or lowering the ends of a horizontal 
dipole to make an inverted V will have an 
insignificant effect on the amount of power 
reaching the antenna from the standpoint of 
attempting to reduce the transmission line 
loss due to SWR. 

Thal^s it! I hope this has been an elucidat- 
ing series on antenna system impedances and 
how to match them 



BIBLIOGRAPHV 

Radio Amateur ^s HandhiHtk^ any recent 
edition 

The ARRL Antenna Bimk . 1 2th Edition. 
Maxwell, * 'Another Look At Reflec- 
tions*' in multiple parts* QST. 1973 to 
1976, 

McCov, 'The Ultimate Tran^match/' 
QST /My 1970, 

McCoy, ^To Use Or Not To Use a 
Transmatch/' CG, February 1986. 
Goodman. "My Feed Line Tunes My 
Antenna! '^ QST. March 1956. 
Johnson. Tmnsmissum Unrs ami Net- 
works, McGraw Hill» New York, 1950. 
Reference Data for Radio Engineers, 4th 
Edition, Federal Telephone and Radio 
Company, 



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Number 1 5 on your Feedback card 



Microwave Test Equipment 



Several ways to use the deteci 



by C. L Houghton WB6IGP 



This article describes same of the test 
equipment which members of the San 
Diego Microwave Group use to make moun- 
lain-topping more enjoyable. The 10 GHz 
detector mount and \U many uses are central 
to this project. You may be quite surprised by 
the variety of uses we came up with, and still 
more wait for your discovery! 

I describe a detector amplifier that im- 
proves the operation of a remote coupled 
wavemeter for frequency tests and measure- 
ments. In a later article* I will cover the use of 
a backfire antenna detector, antenna bore 
sight indicator, and a method of injecting a 
two meter handheld into a 10 GHz transceiv- 
er and copy ing it, which allow s for very accu- 
rate frequency measurements on 10 GHz. 

The 10 GHz Detector Mount 

The detector mount, the backbone of this 
project, is made from a short piece of 16 
series waveguide measuring ^/z" by I " on the 
outside, and 0.4" by 0.9" on the inside of the 
guide. You need only a short section of 
waveguide for each detector mount, which 
you can make quite easily from a discarded 
piece of waveguide (make sure it has llanges 
attached). This could be pan of an attenuator 
assembly. You can build the flanges on each 
end of the attenuator into two detector 
mounts. Ease of construction depends on 
what you can find in surplus. 

If the piece of waveguide you obtain is 



longer, ytNi ooiild place a threes-screw tuner 
just ahead of the flange before Jhe detector 
diode. This can tune out mismatches, thus 
improving mount efficiency. My mounts 
didn't need this, but yours may. The mount 
with a slide screw tuner would make a fme 
detector for your 10 GHz microwave receiv- 
er. This type of detector is normally used 
with a waveguide circulator or a polaplexer 
type of transceiver system. (See the article, 
'* 10 Gigahertz Polaplexer," in this issue.) 

Detector Mount Consitruction 

I cut off the section of WG- 1 6 with a hack- 
saw, Jeaving a single flange and attached 
waveguide about ! U" to 114* long, then fit 
the waveguide v,ith a piece of brass about 
J25" thick, the holder for the ground end of 
the IN23 diode. Solder this pi^ie of brass to 
the bottom of your waveguide (the J " wide 
side), flush with the back end of the guide. 
File the back end of the guide Oat and check 
with a carpenter's square to make it*s true and 
flat. Spilt solder in the guide is quite lossy, 
and should be filed away. 

Now drill a hole into the top and bottom 
piece of the guide through the brass stock you 
soldered on. This hole must be small, so use a 
1/16'' drill bit. Chuck the bit up in your dritl 
so as to have just enough extending lo go 
through both top and bottom in one motion « 
without the drill wobbling or going off true. 
This pilot hole is centered 'A -guide wave- 



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40 73 Amateur Radio • October, 198B 




length from the rear of the guide end oppositi 
the flange. For 10,2 GHz, the '^ -guide wave- 
length is 0J78/ 103 GHz is 0J7i/ and 
10.4 GHz is 0.366." This is measured from 
the back end of the open waveguide to dead 
center in the waveguide face {on the 1 " side>. 
See Figure 1 for details. 

The bottom end of the mount is drilled out 
to 15/64 and then opened up to accommodate 
a tight In for the 1N23 diiKic, Do not go too 
fast or make the hole too large— a tight fit is 
necessary for a good ground connection. 
Drill out the top hole (now 1/16) to open it up 
for the tt>p of the IN23 diodi^ pin, I used a 
7/64" bit. Open it up a little if you need to. 
Tap the diode with a 3-56 thread, or any 
thread on band that will fit the top pin of the 
diode. Short the diode during this operation 
to prevent destruction from static discharges. 
Tin foil works well. 

When a few threads have been cut, clean 
the device and place a small mica washer just 
under i/4'' in diameter over the top of the 
diode's pin. Next, insulate the pin. Cut a 
piece of Scotch tape and place it on a piece of 
glass, then trim your final section 0,080" 
wide* just long enough to go around the pin 
once. When the tape is in place, it will serve 
as a centering collar and insulate the pin from 
the top of the w aveguide mount. 

Fit the top pan of the diode that extends 
from the waveguide, with a second mica 
washer, and place a small brass washer and 
ground clip with the nut to secure the entire 
assembly, inspect the inside dimensions and 
remove any burrs that might have crept in to 
the operation, and which could possibly short 
out the diode and pierce the mica washers. I 
therefore recommend polishing with 400 grit 



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Figure 2, Detector ampHfiir schematic. 



paper. If you are satj^jfled with the mount, 
remove all pans and s^^lder a back plaie on 
(with the diode removed). 

When soldering, place the unit on the end 
plate and insert a small moist piece of paper 
towel to hold the side plate and prevent the 
solder from melting. Use a small amount of 
solder to attach the end plate. Keep heat to a 
minimum to prevent solder from flowing in- 
side in the guide. Remove all excess solder 
and rosin, clean with alcohol, and assemble 
ihc diode on the mount itself. 

You can make a mount as above, but with a 
different top section. It's a tricky soldering 
job, however. Drill a large hole in the lop 
previously used for the top pin of the diode 
and fit in a short section of brass tube, which 
you then solder to the top of the waveguide. 
Next, you attach a BNC nut to the top of the 
tube and solder it firmly in place. Attach a 
short piece of brass rod, drilled to accept the 
BNC center pin on one end and the IN23 
ditxlc tip on the other. When the assembly is 
insulated widi a layer of Scotch tape, and 
inserted into the brass rod with the BNC nut 
attached, it will make contact and complete 
the mount. You will have to adjust the bottom 
spacer and the length of the brass tube so that 
the 1N23 diode pin makes contact with the 
brass rt>d that has been drilled to accept the 
IN23 ditMJe's pin. The rod should be nearly 
flush with the top of the waveguide. See Pho- 
to A for the pre -assembly and Photo B for the 
finished detector mount. 

Detector Mount Tcstjng 

When the detector moon! is finished, check 
the diode with an ohmmeter for front-to-back 
ratio. Use the times 10 scale, since most 
diodes show about 5k reverse and 100 ohms 
forward. Do not use the times I scale y 
because on some meters too nmch current can 
destroy or damage the diode, 

When you are ready to use the finished 
detector mount* connect a 100-microamp 
meter to the diode clip and ground, and turn 
on the Gunn diode oscillator. Hold the detec- 
tor mount one or two feet from the antenna. 
You should have a reading on the meter 
showing relative power received. You can 
use the detector as a field strength meter to 
tune the Gunn oscillator and antenna to best 
match. By coupling a small horn antenna to 
the front of the diode mount, you can move 
further away and see the strength and pattern 
of your system. This is, in effect, a mini 
antenna test range» Credit for the detector 
mount with the threaded diode goes to the 
very fine RSGB VHF/UHF Handbook , 

Detector Amptifler 

By attaching a simple amplifier to the 
detector, and coupling an absorption 
wavemeter with a small horn antenna^ you 
can go funher away from your source and 
make frequency nieasurements. The detector 
and wavemeter has to be coupled very tightly 
ti) sec the slight dip in power from the absorp- 
tion wavemeter. 

The amplifier was very useful in remote 
operation to check our frequency. Without it, 
we had to insert the wavemeter into the feed 




Photo A. Pre-assemhty of detector mount with 
modified top section. Braxs tube is soldered over 
the iarge hole on tap of the \%'ave guide. BNC nut is 
then soldered to the top of the brass tube. 




Photo C.IOdB direct ionai coupler CG- 1 76 mount- 
ed between my Gunn oscitlatorand magnetic isola- 
tor, forward (left} is the detector mount and the 
three-screw matchtnj* f}et%ivrL 

of our Gunn oscillator, which doubtless upset 
our measurements from the loading on the 
oscillator, large magnetic isolators notwith- 
standing. The amplifier on the wavemeter 
skirted diis problem by allowing operation at 
some distance in front of, and just to the side 
of« the main lobe of the antenna. This made 
our frequency reading.s a bit more accurate. 

Amp construction is straightforward. It is a 
simple single-stage current amplifier and 
peak detector rolled into one op amp. You 
can use the amplifier with cither a commer- 
cial or the above home-brew detector mount 
with good results. The circuit was designed 
by my partner. Kerry Banke N6IZW, who 
selected the RCA CA-3130 because of its 
ability to work from a single 9 volt transistor 
radio banery . It works quite well. See Figure 
2 for the circuit diagram. 

Amp Operation 

Enclose the entire amplifier and connecting 
cable in a tight RF-proof enclosure. This unit 
will be used on some high [?eaks where there 
may be much high power commercial opera- 
tion. The RFI will influence your test equip- 
ment and can cause severe overloading to 
some two meter radios. 

You can also enclose the entire back end of 
the detector mount in a small shielded box. 
This provides the bi^i shielding. 

Wavemeter Variations 

We tried two variations of wavemeter 
setups, and each had advantages over the 
other. For the first, we attached a small horn 
antenna to one side of the wavemeter. and the 
detector mount to the other end. 1 then cou- 
pled the amplifier to the detector mount 
which allowed me to move about the front 
side of the dish antenn^j and obtain an on-scale 
reading without loading on the Gunn oscilla- 




Photo B. Fully assembled detector mount shfnving 
countersunk diode. 




Photo D. Completed ompiifier in metal box con- 
nected to Mvventeter (FXR) hyV/i o very' short coax 
cable. 

tor. With the higher meter reading, the dip at 
resonance with the wavemeter was now very 
easy to read and we could easily and confi- 
dently adjust our frequency on remote field 
outings. See Photo D^ which shows the 
wavemeter and amplifier I use for remote 
readings. 

The second method uses a 20 dB direc- 
ttonal coupler inserted between the Gunn 
oscillator and the antenna, in front of the 
detector mount for the receiver. I bought the 
coupler, lubelled CG-176-A. from a local 
surplus dealer for $7.50. The wavemeter, 
with horn removed, is fitted with a coax-to- 
waveguide adapter and connected lo type 
"N" connecter on the coupler. Using the 
coupler^ I can conveniently make frequency 
adjustments from the back of my dish. (See 
Photo C, Directional Coupler). This is much 
safer, since 150 mW of microwave energy 
going to a 30" dish giving 30 or so dB gain 
can cause bodily damage^ especially to tl^ 
eyes. BE CAREFUL! 

Future Goodies 

In a second article (to appear in 7S at a 
future date), 1 describe in detail the Backfire 
Antenna and the two meter injector. The two 
meter injector lets you set a frequency accu- 
rately by coupling an HT to your 10 GHz 
receiver. 

I will make available high power Gunn 
diodes, case style 1 18 with silver brass rivets 
operating at 10 GHz, with measured power 
output of 50-100 mW, for $5 each, postpaid 
cominenial US. There are select, higher pow- 
er devices available for 6 GHz. 10 GHz, and 
18 GHz. (Power output varies from one cavi- 
ty design to another. ) I will gladly answer any 
questions regarding this or related projects. 
Please enclose an SASE for prompt reply .IB 

73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 41 



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73 Review 



by Pete Putnmn KT2B 



Down East Microwave 

Model 2345LY 



45 Element 23 cm Loop Yagi 



Down East Microwave 

Box2310, RR^1 

Troy, ME 04987 

(207) 948-3741 

Price Class: 2345LYK 23 cm Loop Yagi Kit: $82.00 

234SLY Assembled and Tested; $99,00 



The 23 centimeter band 
(1240-1300 MHz) is fast be- 
coming the most accessible of the 
amateur microwave allocations, 
mainly due to the wide range of 
CDrnmerciany-made equipment 
available. This includes several dif- 
ferent antenna designs from both 
foreign and US manufacturers, 
ranging from loaded mobile/base 
whips, to "long-boom" designs for 
weak signal (SSB/CW) and ATV 
work. 

The Down East Microwave 
2345Ly falls into the latter category, 
using 45 full-wave loop elements on 
a 15 wavelength boom to achieve 
nearly 20 dBi gain. The design is 
based on the classic loop yagi pio- 
neered by G3JVL many years ago, 
and loop yagis have found wide acceptance 
from 903 to 3456 MHz since. Down East^s 
literature ciaims that " . . four 23 cm 45 ele- 
ment Moopers' compare favorably in gain to a 
7-foot dish, with much less wind resistance." 
Not only that, but four loop yagis are consider- 
ably easier to install on a frame and use with a 
rotator than a dish. 

Check Out The Parts 

I selected the "K" (kit) version for this re- 
view. 2345LY construction is quite simple^ al- 
though there are several bags of parts to con- 
tend with. I suggest you first sort all of the 
hardware into four or five piles. 
Down East ships a small package of 
4-40 stainless screws, lockwash- 
erSn and nuts that are used to se- 
cure all 45 elements to the boom. 
Sort these into three piles for quick* 
er assembly, 8-32 nuts, fockwash- 
ers, and bolts are also included for 
the boom-to-mast clamp assembly, 
and these can be set to one side. 



Assembly 

Only one tool is really needed for 
95% of the assembly work. Use ei- 
ther a V4" wrench, or, better yet, a 
V4" socket drrve/spintjte. There are 
7 sealed bags containing like ele- 
ments, and each is clearly labelled. 
Don't open the next bag until you 
are finished with the prior one, oth- 




Photo A. This view shows how the driven element is fed, using 
UT-141 rigid coax line. The loop is a full wave at 23 cm. input 
impedance is 50Q- 

erwise you may mix up the parts, causing 
great confusion! The differences in circumfer- 
ence between element ^D23 and #024 is just 
0.101 inches, so a mistake there would be 
hard to find and correct. 

It's best to install the elements from the rear 
forward. The lockwashers allow quick tighten- 
ing, but make sure the ends of each loop don't 
flex inward or outward. Holding the loop while 
spinning the socket drive will prevent this. 
Tighten the loops as snugly as possible to 
avoid misalignment from light bumps or inci* 
dental contacts as the antenna is installed. 

As with all Down East loop designs, two 




Photo B. The 2$45L YK in service (rear) and Down East 3333LYK Is 
front. They make a nice pair for microwave operation! 



reflectors are used. Unlike the 33 
cm and 13 cm versions (reviewed 
earlier this year), the two are of dif- 
ferent width aluminum stock. The 
driven element is fashioned from 
brass strip and tubing, with pre- 
drilled holes for the UT-141 coaxial 
feeder. 

Photo A shows the position of the 
driven element relative to the reflec- 
tors and first director. Down East 
supplies a pre-cut piece of UT'141 
cable soldered to a flange-mount N 
connector. This cable is inserted 
through the tubing end of the driven 
element and soldered to the top. Be 
careful to align the N connector with 
respect to the boom before solder- 
ing the coax I The reason for this 
action is that the connector and 
flange will be bent forward to attach under 
Director #1 , with the connector facing the front 
of the boom. Be sure to flow solder evenly 
around the shield of the rigid coax tine where It 
attaches to the driven element. 

The two boom sections attach using the 
hardware from elements #D22 and #D23, 
allowing quick break-down for transporting 
the yagi. The boom-to-mast assembly con- 
sists of two pieces: (1} A machined piece 
of Vs" square tubing and (2) A mast plate 
with hardware. The tubing fastens to the 
boom with two 8-32 screws, washers, and 
nuts. The plate attaches at a right angle with 
two more 8-32 screws, and the en- 
tire assembly can then be bolted to 
a mast* 

The only catch here is that Down 
East supplies U-bolts for 1 " diame- 
ter mast stock! Jf using a larger ma- 
terial, a hole will need to be d rilled 
on to the plate accordingly. Proba- 
bly the reason{s) this size was ar- 
rived at are the accessory stacking 
frames for two or four "loopers.*' 
that use V stubs with 2" bolts to 
make the mast connection. Evident- 
ly, Down East expects to sell lots of 
these in pairs! Keep in mind that the 
2345 LY (like the 33 cm and 1 3 cm 
versions) must be mounted above 
any mast. If the mast protruded into 
the loop area, it would seriously de- 
tune the antenna. 



44 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



Technical Data for 


the Down East h/ltcrowave 2345LV 


Specification 


Rating 


Frequency Range: 


^.?F^toi.3GHt 


Number of Elements: 


45 


Boom lengi}i: 


143 inches 




(IS. 7 wavelei>gths 




@ 1^93 DOCI MHz) 


weigtit 


S pounds 


Gain: 


>20dB 


{^dd Beamwidth, E-plarw} 




Uajcirtium Fowef Capacft^ 


5^ wails average 


VSWR: 


1.0S:t 


i measured with Bind 43 and 




2&Kstu9# t2^ I00MH2] 





Photo B shows the 2345LY installed on my 
"solufion" to Ihe 1" mast clamps-a custom- 
welded trident assembly with 1" stubs at 
either end. (This might be a neat thing for 
Down East to add to their catalogf) This sys- 
tem allows the use of two separate loopers 
anywhere along a 1'-6* to 2' mast, IX is also 
used when I go portable on 903 and 1 296. The 
2345LY is to the right, with the 3333L YK to the 
left. The load is sufficient for a garden-variety 
CD45II rotor to turn without much sweat. 

Observations 

How does it work? Very wellf The pattern of 
the 2345 is not quite as sharp as my Tonna 55 
etement yagi. but in everyday use with a 
transceiver (such as the tC-1271A) or 
transverter {such as the LT-23S). there was 
little noticeable difference. Communications 
were possible from this location to Baftimore, 
southern New Jersey, and into Massachu* 
S0tts» using an outboard 60 watt amplifier. It 
will be interesting to see how the circular po- 
larization obtained from the use of a loop ele- 
ment minimizes ''multipath*' signals from 
nearby hills and obstructions. 

One advantage of the 2345LY is the ab- 
sence of a boom brace. The 1 " diameter tub- 
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BOVE AND BEYOND 



Pete Putm^fi KT2B 
3335 Fieidstone Dr. 
Doyiestown, PA 78901 

FN27 . .YetA9ainl{Part2) 

The bulk of the assembly work 
went fairly quickly on Friday. The 
weather was excellent (in stark 
contrast to 1987) with tempera- 
tures in the SOs and a lighl breeze 
blowing. Many of the antennas 
had been assembled beforehand 
and partially broken down for tran- 
sit. It was a simple matter to get 
the I wo meter station up and run- 
ning in short order. The H4rames 
fell together beautifully, and Ihe 
skyline soon filled with 70 feel of 
tower and 68 elements-worth of 

yagis! 

ivars and the two Toms set 
about constructing the UHF/SHF 
tower. They had to find some way 
10 cram 536 elements onto an 18- 
fool mast atop the W51 lower trail- 
er! It took nearly all day to do it, but 
the resulting configuration was 
worth Ihe effort. It looked like an 
abstract sculpture! Meanwhile, 
Steve and Bill assembled the four 
5-meler beams in jig time to dis- 
cover that the rotor atop the W-67 
was defunct? Murphy had finally 
arnved! 

Rich arrived about 3 PM with 
the station tents — brand-new 
Hilfary models he picked up on the 
way in. The dome design let a lot 
of light in during the daytime, and 
was jiist big enough to accommo- 
date the 7-fool tabtes laden with 
equipment. The 6 meter rotor was 
fixed, and I removed three Honda 
generators from my ptckup — one 
for each station. Two were 5000- 
watt units and the remaining unit a 
4000- watt model, so we had a fair 
amount of power on tap. By 6 PhA, 
every station was on the air and 
percolating nicely, so we took it 
easy the re^t of Ihe night, 

Final Moment Draws Near 

Saturday found us increasingly 
tense as 2 Pfyi neared. Would it all 
work? Would it continue to work? 
We had our answer right away, as 
the keying relay failed immediate- 
ly on 6 metersl Output was low on 
2 meters for some strange reason, 
and the 220 kilowatt was running 
unsteadily. Oh well, another 
typical June contest! I did some- 
thing Td never done before, and 
started out on 432 SSB running 
250 watts. 



VHFand UHF Operation 

Within the next hour, the 6 
meter relay problem was solved 
and we burst onto the band with 
a vengeance! The 2 meter am- 
plifier was finally retuned. and 
with the aid of an intermediate 
amplifier, we were seeing 1500 
watts output. Tom Richmond 
and Tom Hodge spent quite 
some time tweaking the 220 sta- 
tion, but managed to coax about 1 
kW output from it as things stabi- 
lized. 

What a joy to have separate 
rotors! I was surprised at the 
amount of activity on 70 cm early 
on, and began pltmg up grid 



causing a probfem with receiver 
sensitivity thai I was not able 
to resolve. We were barely able 
to hear the Rover station in near* 
by FM28— only 4 miles to the 
north! it was heartbreaking to 
know we were heard in FIM21, 
FN2(S, and FN30. but couldn't 
reciprocate. 

Tom Hodge pulled out his mi- 
crowave equtpment, and we set 
about making a few Rover con* 
tacts on 2304, 3500, and 10.000 
MHz, FM27 was easy, as we were 
about 100 feet apart and knocked 
off tine QSOs in short order, A for- 
ay in the car and some nosing 
around resulled in a somewhat 
mucky but appropriate path back 
from FM28 on the three bands. 
We weren't ambitious enough to 
drive 40 miles south to FM26, 
though. Many local operators 



*The tropo enhancement 

at night 
was truly spectacular. '' 



squares. In fact, the first 12 con- 
tacts were each made with a dif- 
ferent grid! We were definitely be- 
ing heard on 432. 220 was also 
enjoying some earfy activity as the 
sought-after 'Tox Nancy Twenty- 
Seven" report was given over and 
over- 

Shortly after. Murphy struck 
again. The 220 station began key- 
ing the RF VOX line on the 
THL250U, which resulted in some 
high speed data bursts on 70 cm 
instead of clean CW, Turning on 
the GaAsFET preamp alleviated 
the problem, but the 220 signal 
was "pumping'* the front end on 
432, Out came the 5-year-otd 
Mirage DtOlO, and we made do 
with 1 30 watts for a while. 

Over on 6 meters, the operators 
managed to go through 3 trans- 
veners and 4 preamplifiers while 
maintaining an excellent QSO 
rate! Six was opening in atl direc- 
tions except Europe, and our 
gamble with the four 5-element 
yagis was paying off in spades. U 
began to look like we might actual- 
ly approach last year's total of 204 
grids. 2 meters was also enjoying 
reasonable success, as many rare 
grids were picked off to the west 
and south. 

Many stations were worked 
on 903 and 1296 during the activi- 
ty hours that evening and Sunday 
morning. However, Murphy also 
took a swipe at the 2304 station, 



gave us contacts on 220 and 
2 meter FM. following up wflh a 
visit to the site to ogle the tower 
trailers. 

The tropo enhancement at 
night was Iruly spectacular. Sta- 
tions that were barely 6 dB out of 
the noise on 1296 were 60 dB 
stronger at 9 PMl I found myself 
ragchewing with stations in Long 
Island, New York, and southern 
New Jersey on both 903 and 
1296, enjoying armchair copy. 
Even stations along Chesapeake 
Bay were booming in from Balti- 
more and points west. If only more 
stations had gotten on then and 
taken advantage of it! 

Things drew to a close all 
too soon as the 2304 station went 
up in smoke, six meters blew 
another transverter. and the two 
meter intermediate amplifier 
kicked the bucket. Fortunately, 
the antenna rotors held up as we 
were blessed with light winds all 
weekend long. I spent the last 10 
minutes of the contest trying to 
work KITR in FN42 (made it) and 
we knocked off contacts with 
north central Ohio on both 2 and 
432- The six meter guys made a 
last^ frantic sweep through an 
opening into Arkansas and the 
southwest before throwing in the 
towel. 

I had been keeping track of all 
the contacts on my AMQ portable 
PC inside Bill's trailer, and was 



able to come up with a reasonably 
clean log about half an hour after 
Ihe contest ended- There was no 
doubt we bettered our 1987 
score — we made over 100 more 
contacts witti far fewer six and two 
meter openings. The final tally: 

Band QSOs Grids 



50 


431 


161 


144 


331 


52 


220 


67 


26 


432 


83 


31 


903 


11 


6 


1296 


35 


13 


2304 


2 


2 


3500 


2 


2 


10000 


2 


2 



The total was 964 QSOs and 
295 grids for 361.080 points. In 
1987, we had made 846 QSOs 
and worked 313 grids (mostly on 
six) for 330*000 points, so our ot> 
jective of bettering our score had 
been achieved. The goal was for 
1,000 QSOs and 300 grids. . ,we 
came darn close! In fact, the only 
band showing little improvement 
from 1987 was 432, where we ac- 
tually worked eight less QSOs but 
three more grids. It*s hard to imag- 
ine making more than 1000 con- 
tacts from an area as remote as 
Chincoteague without some in- 
credible band conditions from six 
meters right on up to the mi- 
crowave bands. 

Kudos 

Many people donated time, 
energy, and equipment to make 
this effort successful, and Td 
like to thank them for It: Deb Davis 
from (COM for the '75 series 
multimodes, Donna Irby from 
Encomm for allowing their proto- 
type UHF amp to be beta-tested, 
Everett Gracey of RF Concepts 
for an RFC 3-312 which per- 
formed flawlessly driving the 8877 
on 220, The PX Shack for supply- 
ing all of the F9FT Tonna anten- 
nas, Make Crawford WA2VUN for 
his generator, and all Of the Cus- 
tom antenna support fabrication; 
Bill Olson W3HQT for his help in 
debugging the LMW 13 cm 
transverter, Dave Mascaro 
WA3JUF for retuning the 13 cm 
amp at the last minute, Joel 
Knoblock of the RF Connection 
for providing a sample of their new 
9913 cable for 432 MHz. and, 
most of all , Jim Thompson, Secre- 
tary of the Curtis Merritt Harbor 
Committee ^r his assistance in 
getting permission to use the site 
in the first place! 

ril follow up on some of the 
equipment performance in future 
columns. See you in Novem- 
ber, . . Above and Beyond! 



46 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



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Rtift^ m U VOC ana n v^^h•'■ 
liwv BUN ngs. Qpteonai A& 

i^QffiMiy 524,95 



I inii DArngs an^ tdftat mst£s lo our 4ti ina to iturter iicerwrs 
^ I iirirti. flna«ali Uftpjl and tcctiianl ke^mq Oiijato^sbzi 
L-s (nw bf y«u con smrlidi y^r ii^iii «dii tfn Ol 
- iiraiiabli 



-3 oRP« *24.95 






M2.95 



AIRCRAFT RECEIVER KIT 




Him ^tittmt^ariH cdOBUiMcaHim-Qida up-pisKsiip' it iQO i 

igi«l:h ItaEfHfWbdfteriii. 9nf*«iitoo«ilpeC I (^seiBAtNUn OtiboftriflialEbiiiQiilKpltafte 
oaf iei!i i9J tii« ft jinyiiawv. iHAin^ SDWIil ftrapb^ 
'wrpfoteM VM l lOB lt XnwifEgf-yMttdfiiftfoirsor torpwrgi^ 






flecfivEF casE 
kj|,CAB-t 



S12.95 




SHORTWAVE RECEIVER KIT 

A l^nlii^lic: racelver tli^i ciipiurDB ihe w^rkl «iiri ^u&i a \T .antcnnai Receives 
—11 !^H^in?MH]rtitinfl^ u^rac^or tpiiid.^u partial duiLiqri wiiriAfiC.RF gaiflc^iry- 
tiol, -inET Ml mw aui3n3 oulpul Usr ^ itrw Signfilics iniitei cmp iftr ih^-i liiiJii i ttwtown w^nsitiv- 
Ilk run^ m 9V baJtery Tiiig rs n tfii^EiinACing 5'J:du1 sctiDDl or dub (iKiifCI, dir>d will h - -ours 
fil^^jntrvenlolHemostSfliiaiaOXiii AtOd^ieuiftiiinalcasE^itjnd yuu rutin ii ic^ii :<...', ■.■Uf.mq 

S^ *24.95 Es^r SI 2.95 



RACKET RADIO 



EC£l/13pae»«tr 



iNF f>f VNF Bms 



M 



r^ j iq lM * Na a t ,fC 



M9.95 



FM COMMUNICATIONS/2 METER RECEIVER 

Sen^iWSupKnrtFMrECJBiiKVf l^mi sn^ 5 UH? Siiqinefit timn ^— miMi LdiftfilO?inlr 
i^iiifl|waitHiHKti^(uji(]p«^fialls woathr^mobltptaM -dncirver 

tenets ivacfor ^m*g vc mav ftoQt. nriflhc IF iiMvsmt iJM C' <^ri #lPi 

ad||ii&taE}}es{njetcii Less th^n i j^jv i^n^rtivLtv mm an 9 V baiter^, v^tn Isci mvir Mii\u Dul|y4ii 
D{>tmnj| A3& esse wiilh 5CrAtirttdflra|>{V«x.cffii: machmed adjiVNium hiwlH prinvidE a niceprch 
Idsnorii] look. 

Est? *29.95 E^S',"" * 12.95 



NEW MINIKITS-NEW MINIKITS 



BROADBAND 

PREAMP 

A ^m&iiiK Mi purpose 

'"^m[^ i<icittai' 
^4]ine{v1Vsei£ Vtff 
UHf rig&.Q0Ultes.et£ 

MF 20db9JW IPD 

:^-H3$l 






LIGHT REAM 
COMMUHICATORS 

lafltimli ntodtiivted noistea 
iigni m k 3&fut iriMiul 4c<i«a 
MP tflh V4 m^fl uiinQ Inies. Uses 
39 tCHf cartw lor lua^^ Dfiira^ 
bORL traninBts Hire '■*ido«*. ift- 

Fia& 




nil 1 rti iimrffii MMlt frnifT 



fc 

t-i-6 



*ii 



S8.95 
$9.95 



HIGH POWER FM 
WmELESS MIKE 

A higll pvUBF UTH^ 1^i] Wld 

ttamuiUI^IA t/?>nleteaiTy 
FUeroMcamadto SeMsiEnffi 
raid aece^ anir five Dd 



Fli4hii 



^.95 



IflvD^lHila 






[^ 



TfftMS: • latisfiction Duanniicd * examine Tor lOcrays; if nol pleised, 
re lu rn i n orl gi nal lorm lor relun d • add &% lar shipp in g and i nsu r ance lo i 
miximijniQf $10.00 • foreign add t5% for sui*! aca mall ■ COQ adij SZ^O 
POInUSAanlyl • ordsr^mider $1 5.00 add 11. 50- NT residents add 7'/ii 
ii]B$ rax * 90 day parts w if <anly on all It lis • 1 yeir parls & tabor 
warrinl y on al I wl red uniU, 



PHONE ORDERS CALL 

716-586-3950 



RAMSEY ELECTRONICS. INC. 

2S75BairdRd. 

Penfield. N.Y. 14526 

TELEX 466735 RAMSEY CI 
FAX 716-56B-4754 



Hf tiiutpmeni Regular SALE 

IC'781 Xcvf/ficvf/ps/ttjner/scope,,.&99&.00 Call 



fVf? Tg I 



i oo 






r^ r> 



IC-761 Xcvr/Rcvr/ps/tuner 2699.00 2359 

KM -36 Scanmng tvand nucrDphorie 47.00 
Sf-20 lit speaker w/audio filter ,, 
FL-lOi 250HzhtiFCWfte.,.„ 
FU53A 250 Hz 2nd IF CW filter.... 

FU02 6 kHz AM filter 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer.*. 



149=00 139« 

73.50 
1 15.00 109'^ 

59.00 

59,00 






PP BJW !IM lat 







IC-751A 9 band KCvr/.l-BO MHz rcvr 

PS-35 Internal power supply 

FL-32A 500 Hz CWfito{ht IF).... 
FL-63A 250 Hz CWftlter (1st IF).,.. 
F142A 5O0HzCWtito(2ndir)... 
Fi-53A 250HzCWytef t2ndlf)... 

FU33 AM filter...,. 

FU70 2.8 kHz wtde SSB filter ....,, 
ItC'iO External frequency controller 



1699.00 1469 
219.00 i99'^ 

69.00 

59.00 

115,00109'* 
115.00109'^ 

4900 

59.00 

49.00 




IC-735 HI transceiver/SW rcvr/mic 

PS-55 External power supply 

AM 50 Automatic antenna tujier ... 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter .:...... 

EX'-243 Electronic keyer unit 

yT-30 Tone encoder 

Othf^f Accessories 

IC-2KL 16C L5m solid state amp w/p5 

PS- 1 5 20A exler nal power supply 

PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord. 6-pin plug 
MB Mobile mounl 735/751A/761A... 

SP-3 Externaf speaker. ,,,,„ 

SP 7 Small external speaker 

Cfl 64 Ht£h stab. ref. Jttai lor 751A**.. 
Pf -I gpeaker/patch »^..,,.,,, ,. ,,..,, 

Sli-6 Desk microptione,,.. .,.. 

SM4 Oesk mic - two cables. Scan..... 
SM'IO CompressBf/graph EQ. 8 pm mic 
AT- 100 lOOW 8 bamf auto, anteruia tuner 
AT- 500 500W 9-banil auto antenna tuner 
AK-2 8-band tuner w/mount & whip 
AK-2A Antenna tuner system, isnl^ .. , 
GC-5 World cfock **...,,,.„.,,,.,.„, 



1099.00 

21900 

445.00 

69.00 

64.50 

18,50 

Regufar 

1999.00 

175.00 

349.00 

25,99 

65.00 

5199 

79 00 

179 00 

47.95 

89 00 

14900 

445.00 

589.00 

659.00 

519.00 

91.95 



959*^ 
199" 
369^^ 



SALE 
1699 
159" 
319" 



164*^ 



3S9« 

589« 

449^ 

79« 



ICOM 



it Large Stocks 

* Fast Service 

* Top TiBdes 




VHf/UHf ba^e multi-miydei Regular SALE 

IC-275A 25W 2ni FM/SSB/CW w/psl299 00 1149 
IC-27SH 10OW2mFM/SSB/CW.„... 139900 1229 
IC'375A 25W 220 FM/SSS/€W..,.„. 1399.00 1099 
IC-475A 25W 440 FM/SSB/CW w/ps 1399.00 1099 

IC-475H 75W 440 FI^/SSB/CW .1599.00 1289 

IC-575A 25W e/lOm icvr w/ps...... 1399.00 1249 




IC-471H 75W 430-450 Closeout 1399.00 989" 

PS-35 Internal power supply....... 219 00199^=^ 



9« 



i M U h rf- h 



99.95 
9995 
47.95 
59.00 
59.95 
34.00 
90.00 
Regular SALE 



A6-35 Mast mounted preamp 
AG-35 (Purchased with tC471H) 
SM-6 Desk microphone 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

TS-32 CommSpec encode/decoder. . 

UT45 Encoder/ dec Oder interlace, 

UM5S UliSS w/i:S-32 msrafled... 

VHf/UHf/1.2 GHz Mobiles 

IC-37A 25w220ri«/npmic Ctoseout 499.00 349'* 

IC47A 25w440fM/TTPmic Closeoul 549 00 399'^ 

PS'45 Compact 8A power supply , . . 145,00 134*^ 

UT-16/EX'38S Voice synthesizer .., 34.99 

SP-IO Slim line external speaker ,., 35.99 

IC-28H 45W2mrM.nPmic.,„— .. 499.00439*' 

IC-38A 25W 220 FM. regular mtc 459.00 349'* 

IC 3gA 25W 220 FM. HP mic 489.00 389« 

IC-48A 25W 440-450 FM. regular mic 459 00 369" 

IC'4gA 25W 440-450 f M. TIP mic .. ., 509.00 449« 

HM-14 Eitra TTP microptione . 59.00 

LIT-2g Digital code squelch......... 39.50 

UT-29 Tone squelch decoder 46.00 

HW-16 Speaker/rriicropf^one ...,,.* 
1C-228A 25W2mFM/TTP scan mic. 

1C-228H 45W 2m FM/TTP scan mic... 539.00 479'* 

UT-40 Pocket beep functfgn.. 45,00 

fC-900A Iransceivef controller 639.00 569'^ 

UM9A 10m low band uml 299.00269'^ 

UX-29A 2m 25W band unit 299.00 269^^ 

UX-29H 2m 45W band unit 349,00 319^=' 

UX-39A 220MHz 25W band ml... 349,00 289*^ 

UX-49A 44DMHZ 25W band unit.... 349 00 319^^ 

UX-59A SmlOWumt 349.00 319^^ 



34.00 
509.00 449** 



UX-129A 1.2GHz lOW band unit ,.. 

(C-i200A low I 2(SH7 FM Mobile 

IC-3200A 25W 2m/440 FM w/TTP,.., 

IJT-23 Vofce synthesizer ..,-,. 

AH-32 2m/440 Dual Band antenna ... 

AHB-32 Trunk-lip mount ........... 

Lar^en PO-K Roof mount .„ 

Larsen PO-TLM Trunk !ip mount.... 

Larsen PO MM Magnetic mourit.*.. 
HP 1210 1.2GHz lOW 99 ch FM xcvr 1529.00 1349 
RP-22I0 220MHz 25W repeater ...... 1649.00 1469 

HP-3010 440MHz lOW FM repeater... 1299.00 1149 

Du«to1he siieof th>fr iCOMprO^luct licit, SQin« accessory 
items are laot listed. If you have a qu«£tian. please call 
An prices st»own are sybfecl to ctiianEe without iiGi:ii:e 



549.00 499^^ 
699.00 549'^ 
695.00 529^5 

34.99 

39.00 

35.00 

20.00 

2200 

22.00 




Hdfid-helds Refolar 

IC-2A a-meters........ 289.00 

1C-2AT with OF....... 319.00 

1C-3AT 220 MHz. TTP 349 00 
rC-4AT 440 MHz. HP 349 00 
IC-02AT/High Power 409 00 
IC-03AT tor 220 lAHi 449,00 
IC-04AT tor 440 UHi 449.00 
IC-M2AT 1or2m#/TTP 329 00 
IC-U4AT 440 MHz. TTP 36900 
IC-26AI for 2m. TTP 42900 
IC-4CAT 440MHz, TTP 44900 
IC-32AT 2m/440Mm 62900 



SALE 

259** 
279« 

299'^ 
299^i 

349fi 

349»' 

389*^ 

289*- 

299*^ 

379'- 

399*- 
559*1 



lC-u2A for 2m w/o TTP 
Reg $299 - Closeout S249»s 



A if IT, id h^mt h;indheitl^ Regular SALE 

iC12AT m UGH? FM HT/batt/CEr/nP 473 00 369'^ 

A 2 5W PEP syrtti aircraft HI. 525 00 479^* 

A-20 Synth, aircraft HT w/VOR 625 00 569'^ 

,r'\[ c *\\Sfjrfe,^ for iJ/ excepf micros Regular 

BP-7 42Smah/13.2V Nicad Pak ^ use BC-35 /900 
BP-8 800mah/8,4V Ntcad Pak - use 80-35,., 79 00 
BC 35 Drop rn desk charger (or all batlenes 79.00 

BC-t6U Wall charger for BP7/BP8... 21.25 

LC-U Vmyl case for Dtx using 8P 3 ........... 20 50 

LC 14 Vinyl case tor Dk using 8P-7/8 20 50 

LC-02AT Leather case for Uh models w/BP 7/8 M 50 



iArreisoriei far /C Arid tC-O senm 
BP2 425mah/7 2V Nicad Pak use BC35. 
BP-3 Extra Std 250 mah/8 4V Nicad Psk .... 

aP-4 Alkaline battery case „.**,.„....,. 

BP'5 425mah/10 8V Nicad Pak - use BC35 

CA'5 5/8 wave telescoping 2m antenna 

CP-l Cig. lighter plug/cord for BP3 or DJi.... 

CP'IO Battery separation cabfe w/cNp... 

DC 1 DC operation pak for standard modfts 

Mi4£D Mobile mtg bkt for all HTs 

LC'2AT Leitf^er case tor standard models..... 

RB- 1 Vinyl waferproof fadio lHg.,...,_ 

HII-9 Speak&r microphone.. 

HS-lO Boom microphone/tieadset. „„„.,„.. 
US lOSA Voi wnit 1or HS-lO & Oeluie only 24 SO 

HS-lOSfi PTT unit tor HS'lO-. »...».. 24 50 

SS-32SIIP Commspec 3?-ttine encoder 27,95 



Regular 
49 00 
39 50 
1600 
6500 
1995 
13.65 
2250 

24 50 

25 99 
5450 
35 95 
4700 
24 



50 



For other HT Accessories not listed ptease CALL 



Rf*rf'Wi>rs 

R 71A lOOhHz to 30MHz receiver....,, 
RC-li Infrared remote controller..,* 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter 

FL^63A 2bO Hz CW filter (Isl IF).,.. 

FU4A SSfl filter (2nd IF) 

EX'257 FM unit 

EX-310 Vome synthesizer 

CR 64 Hii^h stability oscillator xtal 
SP 3 External speaker.......,...,,.., 

CK-70(EX-299) 12V OC optiof!..,,.. 
MB-12 Mubile mount ...,. 

ft- 7000 25MHz to 2GHr scan tcvt ...., 
RC-12 Infrared remote controller.... 
EX'310 Voice synthesizer .„..„...., 

TV R7000 ATV unit.. „..„ 

AH-70OO Radiating antenna ........ 



Regurar 

1999 OU 

7099 

69.00 

59,00 

178,00 

49,00 

59 00 

7900 

65 00 

12 99 

25,99 

1199 0O 

70,99 

5900 

13900 

99.00 



SALE 



159" 



1049 
129'^ 



HOURS • Mon. thru Wi 9-5:30; Sat 9^3 

Milwaukee WATS line: 1-800-558-0411 answered 
evenings until 8 DO pm Monday thru Thursday 

WATS lines are for Quotes & Ordering orily, 
use Regular line for other Info & Service depl. 



Order Toil Free: 1-800-558-0411 



In Wisconsin (outside MHwaukee Metro Area} 

1-800-242-5195 



iii^il I V\ [1 4 K4 1 :lil ^ I LVHiHU! 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 

AES"^^ BRANCH STORES 



Phone (414) 442-4200 

Associate Store 



WIGKLfFFE, Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone <2 161 585-7388 

Ohio WATS 1-800-362-O29O 

"oh'o"* 1-800-321-3594 



ORLANDO. Fla. 32803 

621 CammonwealtK Ave. 

Phone (407)894-3238 

F(a, WATS 1800-432-9424 



CLEARWATER, Fla. 34625 LAS VEGAS. Nev. 89106 CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 



1898 Drew Street 

Phone (813) 461-4267 

No In-State WATS 



1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3114 

No In-State WATS 

Outside 1 ann n* con 



Fi" ndV 1-800-327-1917 No Nationwide WATS SS 1-800-634-6227 



ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

5456 N. Milwaukee Aveiue 

Phone (312) 631-5181 

K?s 1-800-621-5802 



INTERFERENCE? 



-k Interference Location 

• Stuck Microphones 

• Cable TV Leaks 

• Security Monitoring 



fyj*s?i KR ^vsitfiM!^ 






EFHGWrVCtS 



ir VHF and UHF Coverage 

• Computer Interface 

• Speech Synthesizer 

• 12VDC Operation 



New Technology [patent pending) converts any VHF or UHF FM receiver into an 
advanced Doppler shift radio direction finder. Simply plug into receiver's antenna 
and external speaker jacks. Uses four omnidirectional antennas. Low noise, high 
sensitivity for weak signal detection. CalE or write for fufl details and prices. 



P DOPPLER SYSTEMS, INC. RO. Box 31819 
Phoenix, AZ 85046 



{mZ) 488-9755 



CIRCLE 15 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




*' INTRODUCES *^ 

THE ^^i^ "^e^et 

OFFERING 



Sfrfki. 



^ BUILT-IN SPEAKER i^ BATTERY OPERATED 

^ OPTO ISOLATED OUTPUT WITH NO MECHANICAL T/R 

SWITCHING 

^ REVERSE POLARITY PROTECTION 

^ SELF COMPLETING DOTS AND DASHES 

^ POWER LOGIC LED fNDICATES KEYING 

AND BATTERY STATUS 
OUR WARRANTY JS THE BEST IN THE BUSJNESSl AM products guaranteed for 1 year under our 

ZERO CUSTOMER COST warranty. No charge for shipping and repairs. 



$39. 



SPECIAL C ^ O 99 
INTRO: ^O^.XX 

S&H $3 - COD'S ADDITIONAL $2 



/^C£ Stf^^Smi, 4 ISiai 365-5937 

RD1 BOX 83; WILCOX, PA 15870 



lC&BSI 



T 
e 



i\ 



snap 

-on- 

choke 




CIRCU 335 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ELIMINATES RF INTERFERENCE IN; 

1^ sct5. Radios, HI FL FA systems. TcJephi>K.is, VCRs. 
Tes^r equipmunt, Burgbr and Fire alarms, Modems, 
Monitors^ Cumpuicrijltidio and 1'V slaiioos^ eic. 

EASY TO USE: Hts over anil snnlps onlosmalJ^ large a&d 
rihbon tablei. No cieed lo rewire conneclurs. L'imcjuej 
split fcrrite core de^'^ign firs up lu RCj8U coax c^bks. 

WORKS IN "COMMON MODE\ filters current in- 
ductiid if) the braid uf shielded cables and ground wirc^s! 

Sp«fliiJ feniie mHterlHl efTcctivi; DJ -200 Mliz. 

DOES NOT VOID EQUirMCNT WAKRANlV 

or order direct from: 

computeradio 

ritix 2tt2. Pine Br<xik. NJ 1*7058 
Td: (201) 2270712 



Package of 4 chokes 
with inst. instruct ians 

$12.99 

-^ $g.r}0 shipping 



Send p^rmoii&t check wiV/i order, h^ ship same day First 
Class^ 30-dily ffWfuy back n-aminty. Qimrxhty disroitnis. 





CIRCLE 345 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



MAO Electronics Company 

PO BOX 5871. ALEXANDRIA VA 22306 
CHUCK 703-360-5145 MARY 
MICROPROCESSOR. DIGITAL, k LINEAR IC'S 
FAST AND COUKTEOUS SERVICE 

MAIL ORDER SPECIALS 

FRANKUN ACE 1000/1200 KEYBOARDS tl5 

ACECALC OR DATAPERFECT SOFTWARE $!0 

80 COLUMN CARDS $40 

7.37 mz TURBO KIT FOR IBM PC'S t50 

RARDWARE RESET KIT FOR IBM PC/XT JlO 

27256-20 |5 60764 *6 80297 $100 

SSI-201 k SSI-202 DTMF CHIPS $7 

NO MINIMUM ORDER. UMITED QUAiNTITY 



< K 



^ 



r 



SAVE 
TIME 

and 

MONEY 
with 
THE 

HAZER 



Bring things down for 
safety and convenience. 

Wever clirrFb your !ower again wllh This efevalor sysrem. An- 
te n nas and rq t a1 Of m &u fi t or HAZER, com pi ate sy s Je m t rams 
lower in vertical uprighi posllion- Salety Eock syalem op- 
erates while falsing or lowering. Never can faH. 

Complete Nit inclydes winch. lOO ft. of cable, hardware an-d 
insrrucitcinis. Fc^^ohn2Q and 25 G Towers 

Haze r 2-H aavy cl U I ^ alufn , 1 2 ^q . f t . toad $297,00 ppd, 

H aze r 3-Standarct af um . S sq. ft. load S21 3.00 ppd . 

Hazcr4'Hoavv galv. s.feel 16 sq. Ft. load S27S.0Q ppd, 

NEW for ROHN45and 55 Towers 

Hazer 9' Heavy duty §alv. steel 16 aq. fi. load CALL 

BalfThrg&i S earl ngsTB-^S for any of above $e4,5{lppd. 

S«nd fcr free details ot aluminum towers specilically 
e ngl naerad tnr us« vti rh the H azer. Two siz^s ; M- 13(13 " v«\4^} 
and M 16(13" wide), All bohedconslruclion, no welds. Easy to 
install hinge bass, wailc up erection. CoinpFeia tower UPS or 
air freight shippatJo. Pr^'aasembled or kit lorm. 

SalEsfaclFon guaranteed, CaJI today and charga lo VI &a, 
M as l&rC ard o r fnaiJ cti«ck or m aney o rd dr. 



GLEN MARTIN ENGINEERING INC. 

Rte 3, Box 322 

Boonville, MO 65233 

(616) 882-2734 FAX 616-862 7200 



NO VEX 



DM40G1 Dip Meter every htjm ueeds one 




;-^iii^y3.fSS.f^^- 






; J ■. J * 1 y^ 
:.'■ '■■. 



Mh^. 



y-.-.J^'^Tr^-t.f^VT', 



A ittuiit fur -Eviiry tiam jhscif - checlc COal-S* tank circuits, 
antennas^ uie a£ RF g^ncriator , internal mDclutationi loo-k 
for harmonics. 1.5 - 250 MHi 6 plug- in toils. 

only S79.95 + *4 S&H 



SWR-3P SWR/Powef/Field Strength 




onty $19.95 +S4 S&H 



white on the air 
ID & 100 •^'^ii ^iLles 
1.7 10 tSO MHz 
SO Z39 coneccors 
5" whip antertna 



PM33Q RF Pdwer M^ter/Dumnny Load 



I. A tu 5«fl MHj. 
50 ghins "Ni'"f 
5/10/ IZt) waTl ranges 
m<^:lJuJ;^ your HF & 

U'X power puEp'ui 




only $99.95 + 14 S&H 



FC5250 Counter know yoiii snmsmit frtquency 

' to Hz lo t50 MHz 

* 7 digits 

- Accurate to ±1 Count 

- Gate [(Jine& I or 5 sec.. 
' HF & VHF inptjta 

» Eiceilent (ot audio 

- AC powef adapter PA9P 




only $129.95 + $4 S&H 







Orders: 8D0-56S'327() 

Electronic Equip me nl Bank 

51 GS tvt[]| S[. ME, Vienna, VA 23HJ0 

fJLtiL fnlTiiitw th3|4i WjipNihiioh. JJC) 



iSextDay 



QSLs 




R(i u iho i^: As fortma n 
Hf Ship Se.TiDa)! 2nd Da^ 



i^Cidf Today ■& 



tAntennasWest 
, (8011 J 75-8425 



100 
200 
400 
500 
lOOO 



S29,95 

S49.95 
S?4,95 



S24. 95 
S,M.95 
S44.95 
S49.95 



S?!>,9 5 S*9,95 



AS.IP 
S 1 p. 9^ 
S3?,P5 

S44.95 
S79,9S 



.■\I1 -■■idtii pfJ JnJ Jjv i\z pri-'Tif,- mjit. 
FoT ■•'^.■tniiihr Jir ^klL^■Tn■ jJd SH.i 

Bo\ .^ilO^:. Ptc\\\ UT S.460.^ 



CIRCLE S3 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



NEW ONLINE CALL DIRECTORY 

Our new HAMOALL service gives you 
472,526+ Hams, via your computer 
$29.95 per year — unlimited use! 

BUCKMASTER PUBLISHING 

Mineral, Virginia 23117 
703: 894-5777 800: 282-5628 

CIRCLE 156 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CB-TO-10 METERS 



We specialize in CB radio modification plans and 
hardware Frequency and FM conversion kits, repair 
books, plans, high-performance accessories. Over 12 
years of satisfied cugtonners! Catalog S2. 



CBC INTERNATIONAL 

P.O. BOX 31500X, PHOENIX, AZ 85046 



THIS MONTH^S GOODIE FROM THE CANDY STOHE: 

KENWOOD TM-221 A 

UNDER 

$400,00 

^a■k^b^J^ONLYl 




SIMILAR SA Vises OS KtSVUJOD, I COM. \ ALSt. HV(iAlS, 
FTC A1.[.LX0> ALLL%MTHD.73 M\hm 

OfirK i^rjirUAAl lttIATE.1} fllE^f^ IN -iViXK M,l rJ^LClIS L'rtilJ J Utlf |l■£.'i.TO^: 

ROSS DISTRIBUTING COMPANY cp o bo. 234A] 

78 Soutn St^te Street. Preston, Idaho 83263 
Teleofione 1208} 852-0830 we Clase at 2-00 on WON. a SAT 



CfRCLE 254 ON READER SERVtCE CARD 



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BJennyLanB 

Battimore, MD2120B 

BASIC RTTY 

September the ihougMs that \\ 
stirs are profound indeed. For the 
cNid. a return to school. For the 
parents, therr child's return to 
school! Hmmm . . I think I found 
a congruence there. Anyway, 
whether back to school or back to 
basics, this lime of year is just 
right for looking at a letter I recent- 
ly received. 

Stan Rutherford WflEUG m W. 
Des Moines, Iowa, is interested 
in getting onto, as he puts it. "Just 
ptain RTTY; no packet, no AM- 
TOR or any other of that space 
age stuff.*' He has an HF 
transceiver and simple computer 
(C-64), and wants to know what 
else he needs, 

Wellt Stan, you already have 
the kernel of a very capable RTTY 
station. Your transceiver is mod- 
ern and quite capable of SSB 
operation, which correlates with a 
good capacity for RTTY as well. 
The computer can serve as the 
"glass terminal" for the station. 
All that you need is a way to 
convert the computer-standard 
ASCII, used by the computer, to 
RTTY-standard Murray, used on 
the air. There are at least three 
ways to do this, 

The cheapest way is to secure a 
program to enable the C-64 to 
operate on RTTY directly, either 
alone or with a simple, one^^hip 
demodulator. I am not aware of 
any software packages for Ihe 
C*64 for this purpose, as I am 
for the TRS-60 CoCo, but I do not 
doubt that they exist. (Three days 
after the publication of this article I 
will recerve notice of no fewer than 
eight of them!) 

Converting the audio output 
of your receiver to the voltage 
blips your computer uses may 
require a hardware device vari- 
ousty referred to as a *TU** {Ter- 
minal Unit). Demodutator. or 
RTTY Interface. Staying cheap 
for a second, designs for a one- 
chip version have been covered 
here in RTTY Loop in the past, 
and are adequate for strong signal 
work or VHF, where noise is not a 
problem. 

Transmitting at this level can 
take several avenues. If the com- 
puter is capable of putting out a 



Amateur Radio Teletype 

clean sine wave, that tone itself, 
property shifted and encoded, can 
be used to key the transnrtitter. 
Otherwise, another one-chip card 
can be put together to convert TTL 
signals to audio tones. As with the 
demodulator, simpJe one-chip 
AFSK generators have been 
detailed in past issues of RTTY 
Loop. 

The next step up, in cost if noth- 
ing else, would find you usmg a 
hardware card to plug into the C- 
64 to operate on RTTY. These are 
available from several sources. 
Check the ads here in 73, Back 
issues may also prove frultfut, as 
manufacturers seem intent on 
adding the latest features (and 
costs), rather than keeping a 
pioduct simple and cheap. 

And. finally, there is the dedfcat- 
ed RTTY interface box. Ranging 
from simple converters to elegant 
multi-mode wonders, these little 
LED-encrusted bricks make oper- 
almg on RTTY little more trouble 
than calling up the local bulletin 
board system. 

Of coufse, if you get such a muk 
ti-media wonder, it might not be 
long before you wonder jtist what 
that PKT or ARQ light is aEl about. 
You might very well find that some 
of the 'space age stuff' isn't alt 
that exotic^ after all! 

RTTY on the CoCo 

Malcolm Hall KE50K, in 
McGehee, Arkansas, is another 
beginner. Malcolm has a TRS-80 
Color Computer IL and wants to 
put rt onto RTTY. again as simply 
as possibte. He notes that when 
he turns the computer on, the 
screen reads '^COLOB BASIC 1 ,2 
(C) 1982 TAHDV:' and wonders 
about the capabilities of this 
machine. 

In an all too familiar plight, 
Malcolm relates going to the local 
Radio Shack, asking about RTTY 
for the CoCo, and they did not 
even know what he was tat king 
about. 

He also notes that, while he has 
seen some programs published 
for RTTY, they were for different 
machines and "the commands 
are different from mine." 

Well, to begin with, Malcolm, 
the machine you possess is 
equipped with Color BASIC, the 
simplest BASIC to come on a 
CoOo. BASIC is, however^ far too 
slow on the CoCo, or most ma- 



chines for that matter, to be used 
In the conversion of ASCII to 
RTTY, While using machine 
language may seem to be an 
obstacle to you, it realty can work 
to your advantage. 

By using a program written in 
machine language, the language 
directly understood by the CPU of 
your computer, you are treed from 
the restraints placed upon the 
system by Ihe resident version of 
BASIC, Such programs have 
been written for the CoCo, the 
most recent of which was pub- 
lished in the January 1 988 issue of 
RTTY Loop. If you canH get a copy 
locally, send me a tape or disk, 
with $2 and a stamped, self- 
addressed mailer, and 1 will be 
happy to send you a copy of the 
program. 

On another note, f^alcolm asks 
whether he needs a printer, or if 
the video screen will suffice. 
Again, it depends on what you 
want to do. For simple ragchews. I 
can*t see any more need to pro- 
duce a paper copy of a RTTY QSO 
than to make a transcript of the 
conversation 1 had on the 2 meter 
repealer this afternoon. If. on the 
other hand, you are handling mes- 
sages, or are into RTTY pictures, 
then a printer becomes essential 
Almost any printer will do. 

Not all beginners use simple 
computers, H. Jack Meadows 
WD7I of Mesa, Arizona, notes that 
he has been inactive on RTTY for 
ten years, since giving away his 
Model 19, and that things certain- 
ly have changed. He wonders 
what it would take to put his Mac- 
intosh SE computer onto RTTY, 
and suggests an AEA PK^232 
**p|ys what?" 

How about a cable and modem 
program. Jack? That's about alt it 
would take with this class of 
"smart demodulator." Talking to 
any of these upper level TUs is 
really little different than talking 
to a telephone modem. As we 
discussed last month, a dedi- 
cated program, such as the kind 
published for the PC clones, does 
make life easier, but it is not 
absolutely necessary. I think 
whatever communications pro- 
gram you have would be an excel- 
lent starting point. Then again, 
I may very well hear of a specific 
PK-232 -> Mac interface shortly 
after this column sees the light 
of day! 

In Search Of , . , . 

Every once in a while someone 
drops me a note in which he or she 
tries to enlist my aid in search of 
something or other in the RTTY 



field. Occasionally, 1 have even 
heard of the item being sought. 
Bingo for this one. 

Charles Gelsmger of Albu- 
querque. New Mexico, has been 
looking for two TTY re-inkers that 
were used, he t>efteves, on Mod- 
elsl5and19. He describes a very 
small unit, about one by two inch- 
es, which was mounted in the rib- 
bon path to keep the ribtx>n fresh- 
ly inked, 

Emerson Cyrus 8P6QA writes 
from Barbados of his interest in a 
C W program in addition to the RT- 
TY program for the Color Comput- 
er, Wellt Emerson. I have not seen 
a public domain or shareware CW 
program for the CoCo, yet. There 
are several RTTY programs* 
several of which have been fea- 
tured in this column, and a few 
commercial CW programs* but I 
have seen nothing from the non- 
commercial sector. 

1 have received more than a few 
questions for such an animal. 
Does anyone know of a true CW 
program, as opposed to just a 
Morse tutor? Let me know* okay? 

Dr. James Kretzschmar N4HCJ 
of Davis, California, is interested 
in receiving commercial RTTY. 
such as from the news services. 
He wonders if there is any way to 
do this "without involving the 
purchase of a computer." 

Sure. Go out and purchase a 
commercial RTTY receiving 
setup. Otherwise, you are going to 
have to deal with the fact that 
commercial stations use a variety 
of shifts, speeds, and codes which 
render them far different in many 
respects from ordinary amateur 
RTTY. 

But, assuming you are nol rich 
enough to afford a commercial 
demodulator, even though the 
commercial units use them as 
well, you are going to have to bite 
the bullet and get a computer. 
fsJow, this can t>e a dedicated com- 
puterized interface, such as the 
popular AEA PK-232* or a big 
commercial terminal. I think you 
will 5nd that a unit such as the 
PK-2g2 will decode about any- 
thing up to a certain level 

To control the interface you will 
need some sort of terminal, which 
may be just that — a dumb termi- 
nal — or an inexpensive computer, 
such as a simple CoCo or C-64, 
running a terminal program. For 
output or hard copy from the 
setup, about any printer will do. 
It's going to cost you about $500 
for a setup like this, or perhaps a 
tad more (not including receiver), 
but it should be worth it. Let me 
know how things turn oul 



50 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



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i[» i;iirt'ii'iMil<-* 






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Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17294-0610 

Please accept my memberst^ip in the Elecironics Boak C?u!>*^ and serid \h^ 5 volumes liat^ 
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purctiasa at teasi 3 tX)Oks ai reguEaf Club pnces (plus shtpfiing amjj han<lting^ if u ring tfie next 
12 months and may resign any time thk&reafter 
















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Signature 

Valid tof new members otify. Fwetgn apfileaf^ wHI recew sped^ Ofdoring instructions Canada 
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New PRODUCTS 

Compiled by Linda Reneau 




PRODUCT OF THE MONTH 

HAL COMMUNICATION CORP. 

Hal Communications Corp., is proud to announce the new 
ST-7000 HF Packet Modem. The ST*7000 was designed speciff* 
caiiy for 300 baud HF packet, inciuded is an AGC-controlled AM 
signal processing, a tuning indicator, and a choice between the 
standard 200 Hz shift mode or 600 Hz shift mode. Both are fuity 
supported by separate optimized 6-pole input fillers, and a 40 dB 
AGO system. The standard 200 Hz shift mode uses phase-locked 
loop (PLL) detector, whereas the 600 Hz shift mode uses sepa- 
rate 4-pole Mark/Space filters, active detectors, and a 3-pole 
post-detection filler. The transmit lone generator uses a cryslat- 
based 10-step sine-wave synthesizer circuit. The ST*7000 inter- 
faces to any existing packet TNC via RS-232C, TTL, or TNG 
audio tones. The ST-7000 is available for $299, including wall- 
mount power supply- For more information contact HAL Commu- 
ntcations Corp., PO Box 365, Urbana iL 61801; 217-367*7373, or 
circle Reader Service number 210. 




ICQM 

ICOM introduces the IC-3210 
25 watt, 2 meter and 440 MHz 
dual band mobile transceiver, 
with full duplex operation and 
wideband coverage. It has 20 
memory channels for two meters 
and 70 cmn which store aH 
relevant information. The Pro- 
grammed scan function scans all 



memory channels or lock-out 
channels in the memory se- 
quence. Priority Watch monitors 
the call channel every five sec- 
onds while operating on another 
frequency. Price: S739. For fur- 
ther specifications, contact ICOM 
America, inc., at 206-454-8155. 
Or circle Reader Service number 
201. 






EDMUND SCIENTIFIC 
COMPANY 



Edmund Scientific Company's 
3-inch torch features a piezo^lec* 
trie ignition system, two flame lev- 
els (eoO'C to 1300^*0), and uses 

54 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



butane gas. It solders, brazes, 
and sweats, and can be used for 
melting, shapmg, fusing plastics, 
or thawing frozen locks. The torch 
comes with a stand for free-stand- 
ing use. The price is $39.95 
plus S2.50 postage. Order from 
Edmund Scientific Company, 
55S2 Edscorp Bidg., Barrington 
NJ 08007. Or for more information 
circle Reader Service number 

aii. 



THE ANTENNA 
SPECIALISTS CO. 

All-band scanner antennas that 
provide enhanced performance 
up to 1000 MHz are now available 
from The Antenna Specialists 
Company. Models MQN-52 (mo- 
bile) and MON'58 (base station) 
feature MICRO-CHOKE^, which 
gives pinpoint resonance at 600 
MHz scanning frequencies and 
concentrated beam focus at low 
radiation angles for maximum 
range monitoring. Scanners can 
pick up police and emergency 
communications These alUband 
antennas offer coverage from 25- 
1000 MHz at low and high VHP 
and UHF bands. The mobile ver- 
sion has a no-holes, "Quick Grip'* 
trunk ltd mount and coax cable 
with installed pin plug and sells for 
$52.50. The base station antenna 
has an easy one<:lamp installa- 
tion and sells for $42.95. For more 
information, contact The Antenna 
Specialists Co,, 30500 Bruce tn- 
dustrial Parkway, Cleveland OH 




44139-3996; 216^349-8400. Or 
circle Reader Service number 
209, 



COMMUNICATIONS 
SPECIALISTS, INC. 

The TS-32P Programmable 
CTCSS Encoder-Decoder is now 
available from Communications 
Specialists, it has all the features 
of their TS-32, but uses a new 
microcircuil, the lC-110, for tone 
versatility. The IC-1 10 contains a 
32-bit reprogrammable memory 
which allows the shop to specify 
any 32-tone frequencies from 15 
Hz to 255 Hz. The TS-32P can be 
configured to provide multi-tone 
switching of up to six tones^ with- 
out requiring diode networks. 
There is also easy access to any 
non-standard tone frequency. The 
32-location tone memory can be 
changed in the servfce shop with a 





^^H 


r^ 


■ 


■ 


^^^P^^^TEF^ 


. tH-l 


iIb 


^^H, 
^^^B 






1 




- ' - * V '^i 


1 




^^^^1 


1 



handheld programmer available 
from CommLinicattons Specialists 
or by returning it to the factory for 
re-programming at no charge. 
The TS-32P operates on 6 to 25V 
DC. Price, $57*95. Communica- 
tions Speciatists, inc., 426 West 
Taft Avenue, Orange CA 92665' 
4296: 800-854-0547 or 714-998- 
3021. Circle Reader Service 
number ^3 for more information. 




ELECTRON PROCESStNG, INC. 

Electron Processing, Inc. has 
added the Tape-Saver TS-1 to 
their line of SWL and scanner ac* 
cessones. It provides scanner 
owners with a way of connecting 
their cassette recorder to the 



scanner so that they won't waste 
recording tape during periods of 
scanner Inactivity. The Tape 
Saver TS-1 automatically switch- 
es thf cassette recorder on and 
off by means of the remote control 
Jack on the yser-supptied 
recorder. Connect the Tape- 
Saver TS-1 to the scanner and 
tape recorder via standard mini 
plugs. A submini plug connects to 
the recorder for ON/OFF control. 
Pricing starts at $49,95 with quan- 
tity discounts. Contact Electron 
Processing. Inc., Sales Depart- 
ment. PC Box 708. Medfofd NY 
11763; 516-764-9798. Or circle 
Reader Service number 208 for 
more information. 



DAVLE TECH INC* 

New solderless circuit board 
kits are available from Davie Tech 
inc. for the electronic technician, 
iBb technician or hobbyist. Dis- 
tance between the tie^poini con- 
tact clip is 2.5mm (0.1 "), They can 
accept at) components with leads 
or soiid wire AWG 22^30 {0.3- 
0.8mm) and accept all DIP sizes* 
The contacts are made of preci- 
sion formed nickel, silver, or gold 
plated contact material, highly 
conductive, with the initial contact 
resistance less than 1 mifliohm at 
1 kHz. Models include the B-147* 
N for S52,50, B-147-G for $84, B- 
124-N for $27, B-124^G for $42, 
B-tT2A.N for $16, B-112A-G for 
SI 9.20, B^64D*N for S290, and the 




B^4D^G for S390. Contact Davie 
Tech Inc., 2-05 Santa Place, Fait 
Lawn, NJ 07410: 20t 796-^720, 

For more information circle Read- 
er Service number 206. 




ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT 
BANK 

The R91 00 heavy duty antenna 
rotator from Advanced Radio 
Devices is available from EEB. 
The R9100 has 10.000 in.-ibs. of 
torque. 23,000 in.-lbs, braking, 
and will support a 2000 ib. vertical 
load. Tine unit fits inside the Rohn 
45 tower and weighs 230 pounds. 
The control unit provides both 
analog and digital displays. 



manual control, and an RS-232 
interface for external computer 
control. Software *s provided* 
Suggested WsX price is $3,975. 
For more Information contact 
Electronic Equipment Bank, 516 
Mill SL Vienna VA 22180; 800- 
368-3270 or 703-93B'33S0. Or 
circle Reader Service number 
212. 




RAPID SYSTEMS, INC. 

Rapid Systems announces 
their new B3200 logic analyzer 



peripheral for PCs. ft has eight 
channels at 100 MHz or 16 chan* 
nets at SO MHz or 24 channels at 
25 MHe, for ftaxibility m digital 
testing and analysis. The fl3200 
features SK per channel memory, 
using eight channels, waveform 
zooming, store/retrl eve/ print 
waveforms, timing and state anal- 
ysis, internal sample and refer- 
ence memories, and advanced 
tfiggering using AND, OR. or 
NOT, 

No programming skills are re- 
quired. Connect the R3200 to the 
PC bus with the supplied mterface 
card, and run the software. The 
hardware, connection probes, 
software, and user manuals are 
priced at Si .995. Rapid Systems, 
Inc., 433 N. 34th SL, Seattle WA 
98103. 206*547^8311. For more 
information circle Reader Service 
number 213, 



GILFER ASSOCIATES, INC, 

The Dressier AR A 900 ts a VHP/ 

UHF active receiving antenna, ca- 
pable of capturing signals from 
50-900 MH2. The ARA 900 cylJn* 
der contains a wideband ampfift- 
er, and an impedance matching 
network. It can be mounted in* 
doors or outdoors. The supplied 
tead-in coax is 25 feet long and 
can be replaced if desired, by any 
length coax with PL-259 fittings up 
to 100 feet. The coupler termi- 
nates in an N-type connector, fit- 
ting the top of the fine scanners, 



such as the JCOM R-7000 receiv- 
er. Price: $189 (Includes power 
adaptor) plus $8 S&H. Distributed 
by Gilfer Shortwave, 52 Park Av- 
enue, P^rk Ridge NJ 07656; 201- 
301-7887. Circle Reader Sen^ice 
number 205 for more information. 





KENWOOD 

Kenwood^s TH-55AT 1200 MHz 
Pocket Transceiver has a fre- 
quency coverage of 1258-1300 
MHz, an easy-to-read LCD dis- 
play, and tone alert monitoring 



system buift in. ft uses the same 
accessories as the TH-25AT Se^ 
ries HTs, except for f requency*re- 
laied items, such as antennas. Its 
14 memory channels store fre- 
quency, repeater offsets, subtone 
frequencies, CTCSS and reverse 
information. Two of the memory 
channels store transmit and re- 
ceive frequencies independentty, 
allowing operation on repeaters 
with both standard and odd off* 
sets. Other features include fre- 
quency lock switch ^ memory re- 
call, memory shift, memory and 
band scan, auto power-off func- 
tkin» and programmable CTCSS 
tone encoder/decoder. Suggest- 
ed retail price. $499.95. Kenwood 
USA Corporation, 2201 E. 
Dominguez Street; Long Beach 
CA 90810; 213-639-4200. 




MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC. 

The MFJ-12S6 Gray Line DX 
Advantage/Terminator is a 
computerized DXing tool for IBM 
PC/XT/AT and compatibles. It 
gives users mstant access to Gray 
Line positions for any place in the 
world, at any time and date from 
1960 to 1999. A high resolution 
map displays the moving Gray 
Line, UTC times, time zones, sun 
position, and latitude/longitude 
markers. It corrects the north/ 



earth's curvature^ and features a 
high speed display mode with 
pause. The DX Advantage can 
run by itself or in conjunction with 
other software, including graph- 
ics- The DX Advantage can also 
be customized to suit your DXfng 
needs. Price. $29.95. Contact 
MFJ Enterprises, Inc., PO Box 
494, Mississippi State, MS 39762. 
601 '323-5869. Order at 800-647- 
180O Or circle Reader Service 
south position of the sun and the number 202. 

73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 55 



ORDER TOLL FREE (800)426-2820 



1 



1 




AEA 

IOMETER 

OR 

6 METER 

DX HANDY 




LET THE SUN DO 
THE WORK 






AEA PK 232 

Your Choice 
HAMTRONICS; INC. 

4033 BROWNSVILLE ROAD 

TREVOSE, PA. 19047 

(215)357-1400 

Hours M,T,W- 9-6 Th-F9-8 Sat. -9-3 



Authorized Sales & Service — Yaesu • Kenwood • Icom 



CIRCLE 309 ON READER SERVICE CARO 




Electricity 



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Charge batteries on 
stored macNriery 

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mitters 

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animals 

Power for your motor 
home 

Run your radio without 
batteries 

Light your home 

Yard Ughts 

Charge flashlight t>at* 

teries 

Light your cabin 

Run electric fences 

Charge your boat 
battery 

Run appliances in your 
home 

Charge hand held 
radio batteries 

Fish shanty lights 

Charge your Caffi* 
corder battery pack 



ALSO; OUTSTANDING PRICES ON IBM XT 
COMPATIBLE SYSTEMS! 

9Mm>1M0 INFOniUTtOM: PUA$£ (WC1.UDE 10-4 OF ORDER FOR SHIP 
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NADIAN ORDERS, ADO tT M IN US FUNDS. M^CHKjAN RESIDENTS ADO 
4% SALES TAX- FOH FREB FLYER, SEND 22* STAMP Ofl SASE, 

HAL-TRONIX, INC. (3i3j28im3 ^ %. 

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P.O.Box tlOt 
Southyata, Ml 4Qt95 




hal; 



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WIZXH 



CIRCLE ITS ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 




MAGGIORE ELECTRONIC LAB 



Manufacturers o1 Qualit y Communications Equi pment 



Repeaters 
Links 
Remote Base 

VHF.UHF 
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•Standard and 
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ProE 



EXPANDABLE REPEATER SYSTEM 



• A NEW CONCEPT IN REPEATER DESIGN. T>« Hi Pro "E" IS AN EXRANCW^SLE REPEATER WTTTi THE POLLOWING FEATURES: A BASIC HEPEATtR WHICH WOULD IN- 

CUiDE A COMPLETE RECEIVER. THANSIiffTTER. COR. FROm' PANEL CONTROLS AND INDlOWOfS, UOCAL SPEAKER AND MIC JACK AND CAPABLE OF FUTURE 

EXRANSMDN ALL HOUSED WSl AN EXTREMELY RUGGED, ENCUOSED, IWNCH ftACK MOUNTA8LE CABINET 

• THIS SYSTEM CfiH BE EXPANDED AT TIME OF PURCHASE OR CAN BE AN AFTER-PURCHASE ADD ON THE ADD ONS ARE-HIGHER POWEFl, 110/220 VAC POWER 

SUPPLY. IDENTIFIER, AUTO PATCH, OR COMPUTER CONTfClLLERS IN ADDITK5N TD THESE ADD ONS AN ADDITIONAL RECGVER AND TRANSMITTER CAN BE 

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eOOWesttownRd, 



MAGGIORE ELECTRONIC LAB. 
West Chester, PA 19382 Phone (215) 436-6051 



Telex 499 0741 MELCO 



WRITE OR CALL FOR OUR COMPLETE CATALOG 



56 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



GIRCt£ 4T OW Rf AOEH SERVICE CARD 





ICOM 



MtuElvrCdFd 



itVHF 

COMMUNICATIONS 



FEATURII»JG W2DflZ 902 MHz 
TRAMSVERTER. NOW ONLY $299 
FREE WITH PURCHASE 140 MHz 3W 
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LEAOINC EDGE, ARftL PUBLICATIONS, 
KAGLO, HAMTRONICS, PROWRJTER, 
ELEPHANT DISKS, DEBCO. TRIONYX 



915 North Main Street 



Wesit'rit A/'^h- Yiffk 'ijitiesfumaf^&ffsdi^ d^er* 



Jamestown, New York 14701 PH. (716)664-6345 



ATV CONVERTERS - HF LINEAR 



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DISCOVEfl THF WORLD OF 
FAST STAN ^^^ TELEVISION 



HF AMPLrn^^ j icf MOTOR OLA BULLETIMS FfRftOXCUBE DEVICES 




Gemplrte P^tu List im HF Amuiirwrs DeEcrib«d in 
ihe MOTOROLA BuHetins. 
AN^SB - 300 Waus EB53 - J JO Walts 

AN7« - i4iJ W^ili Ee2TA - 300 Wfltls 

ANIT? - I& Wain £61(54 - KM Watti 



POWER SPLITTERS anJ CQMfltWEftS 



VK20O- 20/46 Pf Cholse t 1.20 

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Model 99 Heas Smk{6SAl2]iJ 6) I ?0 DO 



AIWA T E U R T ELEViSlQM CONVERTERS 

ATV3 i2d-4 SO :;..., 144.95 Kit 

ATV3 420-41^0. J 49.95 Kit 

ATV* 502-^26 (59 95 Kit 

AUDIO SQUELCH CONITROL far AT V 

<iL ...(39.95 Kit 

a WETEH VHF AWPUFIEflS 

35 Wj» Mpd^ iJSA * 79.95 Kit 

7S Watt Model STSA ,...,.. ill9.95 Kit 

Available in kit fcvm or wired and tested 



500 Watt 
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CHIP CAPACITORS 

METALCLAD MICA CAPACITORS 
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Add t 2.0Q far shipipirtg £ftd handling. 



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CIRCLE 99 ON REAOEf? SERVICE CARD 



THE PX SHACK Inc. 
52 STONEWYCK DR, 
BELLE MEAD, NJ. 
(201) 874-6013 08502 

HOURS: 10AM-5FM ORDERS 
7PW-10PM TECH. 



1 ANTENNA 9 BANDS 




Tomk 



ANTENNAS 



50-5el 

50-7d 

U4-4al 

144-2x4 

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144-9port 

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435-9el 

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432-21 DX 

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435-2x19 S85 



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1255-23ATV $67 
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TRANSVERTERS 

MICROWAVE MODULES 

MMT50/144 20w 2m LF, *489 

MMT50/28S 20w 28mhz \J. :i489 
MMT1 44/26 lOw 28mhz l.f. S259 
MMT144/2eR 25wGaAsFET/DBM :!489 
MMT220/26S 15w 220-25 !;279 
MMT432/2eS lOw W/OSCAR $569 



*i 



GD-6: 
GD'7: 



Ttie GARANT GD-6 dipole was tested and recom- 
mended by TCA (The Canadian Amateur; similar to 
QST) in June IMS. The GD-S and GD-S were tested and 
recommended as first choice in a test of three wire 
antennas by the CMIB (Canadian r^ational Ins! itute for 
the aiind.) TCA ana CNIB conlirmed that the GARANT 
GD^antennas need no tuner on ali bands tested. 
mm BANDS LENGTH 

0O'4O^2O»17-12'1OM 137' 

aO-4Ch30-20-l7'15-1MOM 137' 

160-80*20- 17- 12-1 OM 256' 

160-80*30-20- 170 5-12- 10M 255' 

Choose between 500W PEP or 2KW versions, install 
as a hortzontai dipcle or an «nv€rted-V. SWR usually 
betteMhan 1.5:1. Notunerneeded if properiy instaiied. 
See letters of our ham customers in our data report. 
The GD^windom dipoles are no dummy ioad antennas. 
Our speoiaf GD-balun (500W or2KW) matches the iow 
impedance [50O] coajf feediina to the high impedance 
windom-type antenna. AH GARANT GD-wmdom di- 
poles come with a 3-year limited warranty and a 
lO-day money-bacl< guarantee. Who else has that 
much confidence in his products'? 

VE2MNL Mictiel: "i have instaHed my GO-7. Only one 
antenna to cover 7 bands with practically perfect 
SWR on aN bands, VEIAZZ Gordon on his GD-B: "i find 
iheSWR exactly as you claimed " VE7TH, John on his 
GD-9 FB on all bands Great for DX.' VETBKU, Rah on 
tiis GO-8' 'A great antenna. Excellent bandwidth." 
VEl WCO. Stu Very pleased with the GD-6/2KW. In less 
than six months operation have Jogged on/er 85 differ^ 
enl countries. Recommend It to anyone considering a 
wire antenna." 

Wriie Dr phone for our free data report 
r n C E on all our GAftAN f GD-windom dipotes 
rilXC wifh lectinicdl data, actual SWR 
curves, cuslornef comments, afid ouf 
low factory direct prices. Take advan- 
tage of cur sate pf tees We ship world- 
wide & accept VISA or MASTERCARD 
GAflANT ENTERPRISES 
??7 COUNTY BLVO.DepL 28 
THUNDER BAY, ON, P7A 7M8. CANADA 
iNFD HOTLINE 1-a07-767-38BB 



DATA 

Report. 




CIRCLE 29 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



RF Signal Generator/Counter 




" ■ — " 

— iniiiiiii [ li t [ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiinTmTTn~ 



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J AM modn]3tjon 

/ >;taL jpput/check 

/ DigiiaJ readout 



r^OVEX SG41G2AO only S249.9S + U S&H 

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readi-mt/counrer oh.3y SM^.95 + $4 S^H 



AF Audio Genemtor/Counter 



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rsigit^i lieEKfout 



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Function Generator 



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Orders: 800-3 6S-3 270 '^^t'l.T^;"'^ 
Electronic Equipment Bank 

5 36S M]LJ Si. NE, VJcnna,. VA 22]ft0 

tjuat niinijiil trttfr WaULiiiilH>ii, OC) 



1 1 M«t0r Antennas - 10 Meter Antennas 
Mobile Aittennss - Coax -Accessories 

Jo Gunn Enterprises 

Route 1 - Box 383 

Ethelsvilfe, AL 35461 

(205) 658-2229 

Hours: Mon-Fri, 10 am ■ 6 pm (CST) 



JGAR - PISTOL 



JQAR-HILLBILLV 





GUNN ^ 
Antertnos 




Gam: 4.7S DB 
Mijhiplicatiion Factor: 

t2 Trm*s 
Power Rating: 

2000 CW. 400OPEP 
M*ight- lO^Bal 
W^JB^t: &.0 Lbs. 
MiiTftfials: Ar-odize'd 

&063T'6 AtrcratT 

Alomlnurri Tubing 
Raquir#s 1 Coaxial CabFe 

far Hapk^Up 



Spacificjrtioni 

GiJ'fi H or! iOn la I -5-26 OB . 

Vertical - 4.75 D6 
Multjplic&tion Fici&rs: 

Hofijonwl ■ 1 7 Times 

Vflrtical - ISTimefi 
Hon. TO V&n. Saparation: 

2Q- £5 DB 
Power Rating 2000 CW, 

4000 PEP 
Height: 1 1 Feel 
Weight: 10 Lbs. 
Matenals: AnocTized 

6063T-fi Aitcfaft 

AJumjnuin Tubing 
Requirne. 2 Sepamte CoSirbaF 

Cables tor Hook'Up 



Call or Send $2.00 for Complete 
Catalog and Pricing of Antennas. 

DEALER iNQUIRiES. PLEASE CALL 



73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 57 



Number 20 on your F«tdbacl( C«fd 



73 Review 



by Ray Weber KAIJJN 



Motron Auto Kail 

Model AK-10 

A way to beat busy repeater chatter. 



Motron Electronics 

695 21st Ave- 

Eugene, OR 97405 

(503)687-2118 

Price Class: $90 



Here's a device almost anyone can find a 
use for. The AK-IO attaches to any FM 
receiver and decodes touch tones to activate 
both an LED indicator and a speaker output. It 
has built-in switches that set it up to decode 
any 3 digit touch-tone code, including A 
through C, 

The unit is in a smalt 51^ * by 3" by 1 V^ " case 
and includes an external AC power supply and 
audio patcii cord. 

The unit performed amazingly well with 
low quieting signals. It took about 50% quiet- 
ing for reliable operation. It operated well 
on 12 volts DC, and with the included AC 
supply. 

The AK-10 uses an SSI-202P tone decoder 




chip to provide crystal-contf oiled, reliable de- 
coding. Tbis chip is known tor its excellent 
performance, and exhibited It rn this test. It 



reset when getting a wrong signal and did not 
false. Low power CMOS chips afe used 
throughout for minimal current consumption. 

The AK-1Q connects to the speaker audio 
and provides an internal speaker that is acti- 
vated when the proper tones are received. 
The decoder can be bypassed with a front 
panel switch. 

The unit resets automalcally after being 
tripped p but leaves the front panel LEO lit to 
indicate that it received a signal. 

This unit is an ideal device for anyone that 
wants to receive messages on FM wiihout 
constantly hearing on-channel traffic. II is per- 
fect for emergency personnel activation — or 
hearing calls just from fhends!' 




1988 CALL DIRECTORY 

(On microfiche) 

Call Directory $8 

Name Index . , . , , . . . 8 

Geographic Index 8 

All three — $20 
Shipping per order $3 

BUCKUASTER PUBLISHING 

Minefal. Virginia 231 17 
. 703: 694 5777 800: 282-5626 

CIRCLE 7 DN READER SIHVIGE CARD 



SPECIALISTS 

IN FAST TURN 

P.Q BOARDS 



PROTO TYPE P.C. BOARDS 

AS LOW AS $25.00 

• SINGLE & DOUBLE SIDED 

• PLATE THROUGH HOLES 

• TEFLON AVAILABLE 

• P.C. DESIGN SERVICES 

FOR MORI' IN FORMA HON 



Ar 



/I/I id I and 
lechnologies 



34374 EAST FRONTAGE ROAD 
eOZEMAN. MT5971 5 (406)586-1 190 



CIRCLE 252 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

58 73 AmaiBur Radio * Octobef. 1988 



Let the Sun Power vour Station! 




ThKi^2^SS> BulUc kircJQRVSc^lsrPouvrtsiippLy keeps your 
rcpc&Tifr on ih* sir 'to^ji^ th* (;k"^b <.'*r pc^tt-ir^ v\>ur IOCkv HF is-ciiTi-^a 
60 hrs a mofirti^ Cop:irt>| circuiT ^pf^J^ ctiAr|f. protects ^ctc*|t<iS; 
^icakJ bairtnes-. FuHv a!t$<ni1tkJ, OE^'. rn^rttibl^, Es^ilv fspanJeJ.j 

.^4iius*H A,F^^l,.l.r^ AntennasWest 

(801)373-8425 "^ "--^ ^"'' ^^^ ^^c^ o m ^46f>j, 

CIRCU 303 ON READER SERVICE CAJ^D 




MI&SION CONSULTING. INC. 

MISSION COMMUNICATIONS 

J J 903 Are* CitKine Swrie Soo 

HOLJSTON. TEXAS J70B2 




lcQ*A 



. ^-- ■ *. 



'|i < I J 



'4> 



WE HAVE EXPANDED AND NOW STOCK 

MANY NEW PRODUCTS WECAHi^Y' 
AEA. ALtNCO A^ECO AMP SUPPLY, ftPHA D^LTA, ANTECO. 
ARBL, B&B INSTRUMENTS. BARKER & WfU-lAMSON, BENCHER, 
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SPECIALISTS, CRB RESEARCH. DAtWA, DIAMOND HENRY, 
HUSTLER, HAM RADIO, INTL CRYSTAL tNTL, WIRING & CABLE, 
KAWTRONICS, KACHINA, KENPRO.. KDK, KLM/MIRAGE,, LUNAR, 
LARSON, MOBILE MARK, MFJ. NEUTECH, NCG. NYE. PERIPHEX, 
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CALLBOOK, SAMSON, SPl-RO< SMllEY AMTENNA SANTEC SYN. 
TEXTILES. T-JMAG, STANDARD, TAG, TEN-TEC. VALOR. VECTOR. 
GORDON WEST. WELZ. YAESH. AND ICOM 
In tiotise ssrvicB avsitattfe {7^^] 1 7§'7 ?S4 



am;u ler on header sewvice card 



©'"Pel. 



(801) 497-8873 



1057 E. SI 00 So. • Salt Itkm City, Ulih Mioa 

We want to be Your Radio Store 

Full Line ot Amateur Radios, Computers, Interlaces 
& Accessories Tim W710Y or Preben KTKMZ 

Utah's Rrst Full Service Dealer 
KENWOOD O riCOli YAESU 



CIRCLE 3A3 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



NEW! 

Made Easy & Fun 

Intrdd^Cang IHe most Comprehansivt and Easy- 
lo^Use codd Gours>e available today t 
—MORSE TUTOR is available for IBM PC. XT. 
AT. PS/2 and compatibles. 

FEATURING! 

# 1 -1 00 wofd/mmute code speeds 

* Standard of Farns worth mod&s 

* Adjustable code frequency 

• Ov€f 1 Billion Dossible random QSOs 

• Letter, number, and punc!. mark coverage 

# Self caiibrafing/menu driven design 

* Display text— while listening or after copying 

To Upgrade or learn CW. Send check gr MO. for 
$19.95 + $2S&Hto: 



"Mtjrtft Ti/|Qf ig. qu'la 
iilmply Bflubertj'viilue" 
ar>'ailHa31in[j!i, KAIHY 



QQJi 



REFER TO QST 

JULY'ftSP 49 



218S1 Summer Circle. Dept. MTS 
Huntington Beach, CA. 92646 

CA. Resideriis add $1 20 sales tax 

! jOW AvAFLASlE tHRU UNClE WAYNE 3 BCXmSMELF 
THE ARAL 4 RNEE DEALERS E VEfl VWHEnE 



CIRCLE 339 ON REAPER SEDVICE CARD 



GIVE YOUR EARS A BREAK! 



.# 



^tiX-i^. p-^e 






» Auto- Kail 

AK-10 



Complete ready to use DTMF sdective calling unit 
Use with FM or AM transceiver, scanner, etc 
BuJIhin speaker • Autfimatic speaker reset 
Easy prograrrtrning with switches •Call light 
Unrestricted 3'digit corfe. allie digits •Wrong number reset 
12 VDC mobile or base with 11 7 VAC power pack (included) 




MoTron 
Electronics 

695 W. 21st Ave. 
Ejgene OR 97405 

CallToll Free I -800-338-9050 or (503) 637-2118 



*89.95 

($3.00' Shipping/ 
Handling U.S.A) 



CIRCLE 127 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



THE RF CONNECTION 

"SPECIALIST IN RF CONNECTORS AND COAX'^ 



Part No. 

PL-259/USA 
S3 ISP- 1050 
S3'822 

PL-25&/ST 

UG-175 

UG-^r76 

tJ(^-21DfU 
UG-21B/U 

UG-21D;g'9l3 

UG-146/U 
UG-83iO 



[>escriptlO'n Price 

UHF Mate Ptienoiic, US^ made $ .so 

PL-259 Phenol ic.Ainphe-nol 95 

PL-259 Tefior, Amp^ienol 1. 50 

i>HF Male Slaver Tefton, USA i,0 

Reducer fof RG- 5^ 20 

Reducer for RtS- 59 & M I NJ 8 2 

N Ma%RG-8, 2i3. 214, Amphenol 2.95 

NMaleRG-e, 313, 214, Kings 4.00 
N Ma Je Pfh f or 99 1 3 . 9086, 82 1 4 

fits UG-21D/U A UG-21B/U N's i'&O 

N Wai e for RG'8 With 99 1 3 Pin 3 -^^ 

HMm& ior RG-S with 99 1 3 Ptn 4.75, 

H Mate to SO-239. Tetton USA 5.00 

H Female to PL- 2 59 , Teflon ISA. 5.00 



"THIS LIST ftEPRESENTS ONLY A 
FRACTION OF OUR HUGE [NVENTORY ' 

THE R.F. CONNECTION 

213 North Frederick Ave. #11 
Gaithersburg, MD 20877 

(301)840-5477 

PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE SHJPPING 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
VISA. MASTERCARD, ADD 4% 

UPS C.O.D. ADD $2.25 PER ORDER 



CIRCLE 115 ON READER SERVICE CARP 



Discover 



CAROLINA WIN DOM 



80-lOM 
Use transinatch 
132" t>v#j"al( 
Matching XFMR 
Line Isolator 
Vert Rod igtgr 
CoaK fed 
Assembled 
S6995 



High performancf 
Proven Results 
$70 Beann? 



<^- 



YouT 
Passport 

To a w Of Id 
Of new ideas 
And ejtceptfonaJ 
HF wire antcfina& 



Rugged rtfiw Ciaiuns 
Full rai;geof HF. VHP 
mobile ant^nniis, ducks, wire, 
cDas. parts, line, accessories. 



SEE WHAT WE'Rf DOING NOW! 

Cortact Jjm. W4THU— free discount catalog 

Send % 1 for calalog by l&t C3iJ£.s mail, 

BoK 6159, PoftSFTiouth. VA Z3703 

(Dealer inquiries Welcomei 

804*484*0140 



CAROLINA WIN DOM 

SKE THE RKVJEU \^ f L N E 33 WOKLD KAOtO MAGAZLNt;, 

Enthufiia.^tic users ^y ifs the best wire antenna, Ouiper- 
forms wire antennas previously iised> K nock -you -sncks-off 

\\ vnu hcartine, votrH want one. 
Madc^ witlrjiride by tlic: RADIO WORKS in VA/USA 



CIRCLE ISO ON READER SERVICE CARP 




Wideband Preomp 10-1 000 Mhz 

Dual GasFet low nois^ 
preamplifier for HF, UHF or VHF 
systems. Just perfect for the R- 
7000, Excellent for Spec 
Analyzers, Scanners, etc. Gain 20 
Db +/- 1 DB, -3 Db at 2 a 1100 
Mfiz, 1 Db compression of ^^10 
Dbm, Intercept points 3»«45 Dbm. 
New shipped price of only 

$124,95. Pa* residents please odd 
6% state tax. 

GTI Electronics 

RDl BOX 272 

Lehighton, Pa. 18235 

717-386^4032 



CIRCLE 327 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



5-1000 MHz PREAMPLIFIERS 



WLA21M 
WLA22M 
WLA23M 
WLA24M 



NF 

3dB 

4 
4 
3 



G 

13dB 
11 
22 
20 



P(1dB) $ 

SdBm 57 
12 61 

12 87 

18 109 



430/50 MHz CONVERTER 

RXC431 .15uV 20dB 99 




WILAM TECHNOLOGY, Div. of 

WI-COMM ELECTRONICS INC. 

RO. Box 5174, MASSENA, HX 13662 
(315) 769-8334 



CIRCLE 3 1 9 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Soft-Control 

Power! 

Software to 

• Manage your radio's memory 
channels from a PC 

• Control your radio's functions 
from the PC's keyboard 

• User friendly operation 

Avatlat^le NOW for Kenwood 
TS-440S, TS-940S and IBM PC, 
AT; or compatible. Inquire for 
other radio/PC combinaiions. 

ONLY $59,*^ 

Rad-Com 

P.O.Box 1166 
Pleasanton, CA 94566 
(415) 462-4609 



CIRCLE 356 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



antenneX 

'7fie mini-magazine for antenna experimeniers" 
DO YOU - 

• Have a bijsy mobile signal on all bands? 

• Need an inexpensive directJo-nai antenna tor 10 m&lers? 

• Canl choose between 3 vertical or hnrlzonla] antenna? 

- Need a. low noise antenna for 160 meters? 

• WaiJ to design m antenna buJ dion't wan! tp redo tie wheeJ? 

- Need a program for anteona design and antenna plotting? 

• Want to find out If someone else has solved your problem? 

• Don't know what aitenfia is best for bamsats or others? 

• Need a disguised mobile antenna for the car? 

• Want a cheap automatic antenna coupler for any type riff? 

• Just want to team more about antennas? 

THEN rOU MUST SUBSCRIBE TO ^ antenneX 

anfenneX is a mmi^n-iagazirre for antenna experimenters from the 
new ham to the aldlimfir, ThErre is somcthinp for everyone From 
computer-aided design to referent table of dipoJe measiirements 
to a qirestion and answer column Everyone wHI find something 
of interest! 

A one year subscription Is only S11.97 for Continental USA and 
possesEons. SI 7.00 fcir foreign surface mail. 

Send your subscriptiDn to: 

antenneX 

P.O. Box S995 Depi- 19 Corpus Christi, TX 78412 



CmCLE B2 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Microwave 

1.2 Ghz. 
power atripiifiers 

brick modufes 

1.2 Ghz. 
preamplifier 

VHF 

220 Mhz. 
Pre-amps. 

144 Mhz. 

Pre-amps, 



UHF 

900 Mhz. 

FM power amplifiers 
Linear power amplifiers 
Class "C" brick modules 
Linear brick modules 

400 Mhz. 

Linear power amplifiers 

Linear brick modules 

900 Mhz, Preamps. 

440 Mhz. Preamps. 

Transistors 



I 

■ 
I 



Nec. 2SK-571 Mrf- 1402 Mgf-1200 
C2558 1302 1100 

Nec. 41137 966 

9<J0 Mhz. FJ^ TRAlSfSMITTERS 
ANTEf^NA SWITCH BOXES 
FM TRANSCEIVERS 



TeJ. 1-716^692-5451 
W2WHK 



210UticaSt. 

Tonawanda. NY 14150 



CIRCLE ai ON READER SERVICE CARD 



,1M 



QRZ CONTEST! 

VHF Contest Software 
(or PC CompaEibles 
$39.95 postage paid 

-^ Covers all VHF and UHFcor^tests 

— hicludes the 70 IVTHz European band 

— Menu driven and user friendly 

— Color and options user configured 

— Grids worked display on-line! 

— Full dupe checking 

— Complete log editor included 

-* Handles 4000 contacts with 5 1 2K 
-* Demo- version available $5.00 
~h HF Version to be available soon! 

ATFAB Computers and Electronics 

P.O. Box 4766 

Maineville, OH 45039 

(513)683-2042 

^S i I^BJ Accepted 



Ffab 



rpm^uhrn ind Fli*-i;rr*-"-r' !■ t 




I 
I 



CIRCLE 3&7 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio * October, 1988 50 



*** Super Eomshack 64 *** 

Programable Repeater Control ler/HF & VHF Remotes/ Autopatch 

Rot0r Control/Vofce Meters/ Pagti>g/User Logging/Unllmfted Vocabulary /BBS 



REMOTE* I 




CSMS * Hfl t* aiRT/PK8*CSfl »BASE TX/RX 



1 



IS440/940/140 
IC73S/761 

REMOTE ^ 



WlwQ 



iiii];f;[i]>ii!:}«.-cii 



COmQ 






FT727R/767/736;TS71 t/B 1 1 




AUrOPATCH 
ROTOR CONTT?a 



Set up ymjr own persona! 
repeater with any Dual band 
radio from your homfl or club 
%\\B. Operate cross-band for 
Instant full duplex operation. You 
o&n have your own system ! We 
will help you get your system 
operational I Hew Ver 7.0 
^twnre. Simplex ^ftware is 



t^PEATC R CONTROLLER 

•Changs all vari^l^ remotely 
*C1ear Synthesfzed voice 
^Program iiieU box or select ID 
tail mess, with touchton^ from HT 
*AI«rm cloclc £t auto excute 
*hacro ccmmands/user loQgtng 
•liKlWIclual user access codes 
*Code practice & voic^ readback 
*Talfcfiif Bilars^l/loalvMi 

H.F. REHOTE » 1 
•20 hacrc raem/auto mode set, 
*Scan up/down ssl, rate or step 
*Volce ack. all control commantte 



AUTOPATCH 1. HEVEftSE PATCH 

* 1020 ( 18 d1g1t)tel^«'s Stored 
*300 users/CTCSS;2toiie pagino 
*50eat)le/c[lsdbletel.*'s 
^Directad/general/ reverse page 

* Programable answer message 
'♦Full or Half duplex ( level cont J 
*Secyrtty mode/ IT readback on/off 

* Reverse Patch active all modes 
«Cel1 waittng/OutcS; tflel/autoofl 

¥.H.F. REHOTE ^ 2 

*Dual VFO's/ ftev/SpMt/COft detect 
*Set Scan Inc. ^ offset/ var. resume 
*noftUor moileSc Link repa&ters 



tilNI (BEAR CAT} CQHPUTFR CQMTRQI FT-7?7R 

Proi^ams and Scans Mam/6eneral coverage Converts HT into a 
rfu) 1 00 ch. scanner ^ programs al! fn H.T. for field usei 

•Digital "S" meter; comment fields; 
Aitto resume; delay; lockout 
•Loads & programs all FT-727R 
parameters In less that 15 sees. 

♦Includes hardware & disk for C64 




orlBH PC tnO&EL727S $39:95 



Suoer Comshack CS64S $349,95 
^ $4.00 stilp USA; Ificl. cempiiiar 
interface, disk, caliles & manual 
(simplex version tnc, on request) 



SYSTEM OPHONS 

•External Relay Control 3 DP DT relays + 
5 open col lector outputs.CS- 8$ 79.95 
•Retor control; speaks bearing & 

rotate;! degree Incre HniS49.9S 

•2 Voice Meter St Alarm inpirts/6 Ext. On/ 
off a)ntrols/Packet.e6S..RICd $149,95 
•EPROU Auto boot Cartridge customised 

with your system CART $99.95 

*rianual (Refunded) HMI $15.00 



I2V C64 SWITCHER 
•Power C64& 154 

•70khz 75S efficient 
•Outputs 5v,ai2A Si 

9VAC^60H2 
•Crysteltimeb^^ 
•Plugs Into 064 power 

MODEL DCP5. $119.95 




TDC64 



^'DE CODE-A-PAD " 
12VDC 



I 



SERIAL DATA 



RS232/C 




Touchtone to RS232C C500 baua intertacaT 

Program your computer In basic to decode multSdlgit 'strings', sound 
alffl-ms, observe codes, includes basic program forC64VIC20/Cl26; 
'Decode- A" Pad' works on all computers|riODEL DAP $S9.95 



"Audio Blaster' IC02/Q4;2AT-U16;fT2Q9y7?r:73/73B 

nodule Installs Inside tlw radio in 1 5 Min. Boost ^dto to 

1 wettf Low stancJby drain /Corrects low audio/ 1 000|sof 
happy u ser s. M i nature audio am p 1 i tier - - > ^^^Mftip 
Used by Police .fj re, Emergency, when it needs to be HEARD 1 

WoV^ithelsloud 

nowMIYoucan '^AcL'efcJis 




Touchtone 4 Digit Decoder 

& QUAD RELAY EXPANSION OPTIOH 




hear everything 




tInWersal/wsrks In ill Hrs 
MODEL AB1S-$22.95 



TSDQ4DtGITDEC00ER QUAD OPTION 

•On board regulator ; 6 to 1 5 VDC input 
•Field prog jumpers; 50,000 cod^ 
•Momentary i< Latching; DPDT relays incl 
•Wrong digit reset ;LED's for digits 5< latch 
•24 Ptn Conn, easy hook up & Expansion 
•Quad (4> Relays; (2Amp)P)ug in Option 
with lHDIViOUAL5 PiQltonikoffcodeg 



TSDQ $79 95 QUAD $ 99. 9S | 



EHGINEERING COHSULTING ^ SSS CANDLEWOOO ST.** BREA, CA, 92621 
HASTERCARD ** VISA ** CHECK" ll-O. *• CA. RES. MX^ m T^: 714-671-20OT 



CUSTOM EMBROIDERED 

QUALITY HAM HATS 



7 



$ /^ 



95 
ea 



ea 



Display your name, call and hometown 

on OLtrtop quality summer mesh cap 

with white seamless front and matchirtg bill 

They come in royal blue, red or brown with matching^ 

color thread 

WINTER CORDUROY also available q 

in red or navy blue with white thread *w 

Please senc first & last name (max. 14 Itrs) 

call (max. 6 rs), city & state (max. 14 Itrs) 

BE SURE TO INCLUDE COLOR 

Send Check or Money Order, Plus $3.00 Shipping 

and Handling Per Order. Add 25c for each add '3 cap ordered. 

ALLOWS TO 5 WEEKS FOR DELIVERY MD RESIDENTS ADD 5% SALES TAX 

WE WELCOME INQUIRIES FROM CLUBS 




'PO Box H7^* Sev&rna ParK. MD 21 1 46 



MAKE CIRCUIT BOARDS 
THE NEW, EASY WAY 




WITH TEC*200 FILM 

JOST 3 EASY STEPS; 

• Copy circuit pattern on TEC*200 film 
using any plain paper copier 

• Iron film on to copper clad board 

• Peel off film and etch 

convenient 8^x11 size 
With Complete Instructions 

SA TlSFACnOti GOARAriTEED 

5 Sheets for $3^95 10 Sheets onfy $5.95 

stdd $1.25 postetgc ^Y ffes- sdd sstes tax 

The MEADOWLAKE Corp. 

Dept. B, P.O. Box 497 
Morthport, Mew York 1 1768 



CIRCLE S& ON READER SERVICE CARD 

parky^Antennas i 

The Spartiv J-.\nwiina n 3 fltxibichalf wiave r^Jiato-r tViJ by 
PA'o wsi'dengchs of iow loss coas Jhrough an ^ffi-cif nt tinc^r 
matching Iran^rormtr. Sparky J*t beati;£uclit(fi, 1'4. Si 5,-'^ 
wai-t anitfnnas. need no. ground plftn^.Lott" flar S^'Rcuir%-<? 
gi\"CJ^Jgi- 10 edge ban J to^'crage. Greii poriabk— rc*lli up 
10 i\[ in pi^ctdc. CLVmptcrcly assf jrbkd wirh BNC c^^nnictor. 
* Easily hMJ^n • litTec^cJ^'* irtiioors o-r v^ut. • Money- back gusifanr*^ * 
— ^ Available for fverr band rrom ik io 44<1 MHi; 

L/ 1^29?^ each T^^forSSS?*^ Aid S5 P .^ H 

™ t>J>pM.kSlbJ'Ut^l=^iiffl*d Antennas We St 

IBox 50062^5. Prov-g UT S4605 (801) 373-8423 




CIRCLE 5 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



CBTOTEN 

73 has led the way on CE-lo-10 ititittjr conversions. Tske 

advaiitcigt! of our offer to help ynu gel -on 1 mtlers before the 
sunspols fheak again. iL'^i^asy and saves you money! 



# Titk 



Issue 



1 ^ndpla» and Crystal InUi 

2 Conversion Data 

3 KadJo Shack TRC-47 

4 E.F, Johnson Messenger 12 3A 

5 HyGflin67nB 

6 An lenna Suggest ion fs 

7 Radio Shack Real i Slit TKC-JI 
S ThePublicom I 
9 How abou I SSB Con versi o n s? 

1 Rmi i Shac k TRC- 1 1 and ! RC 74 

1 1 Radio Shack Reailsiic Mini 123 

12 Hy-Range 6ft I A |Hy-Gainl 

13 Kra€oKCB2310B 

1 4 Uf a yet Ee Te tsat SSB -75 

15 Radio Shack Ri?alistic TRC-452 

1 6 CB Wa3 k i t^ -1 "aik i e Con vh rsi o n 

1 7 Sha rp M odej C B-«OU A 
1 9- SBE Sidebander 111 and Face 1 23A 

19 Midland 1 3'«8ZC and Other PLL Rigs 

20 LafayetleSSa 75andSSB'100 

21 Roy ce 1-655 

22 Johnson Viking 352 

23 CBtolOFM-Partf 

24 CBtolOFM-Partll 

2 5 More Talk Po we r for the TRC- \ I 

26 Sears RoadTal kor 40 

27 Penney s SSB Rig 
2& The FoJy Paks 40'Channel CB Bqard 

29 The Cobra 132 

30 New Life for SSB CB Rig5 

3 1 Doub! e You r Cha n iicis in SSB Cot3 version s 

32 On Ten FM 

33 Put i hal My Cain CB Board to Use 

34 Peaking and Tweaking Hy-Cain Boards 

35 CB to C W ? {H y Cain i 

36 Maximum Modulation for CB Conversions 

3 7 Bl >ef Up Your C E lo-C W Con version 
3fi Add a Digital Readout to Your CB Conversion 

Send $3.00 for the first article and I ]. 50 each thereafter. Jusl 
choose the article numbers and cjill with a credit card number 
or send a check or money order to: CB to 7V?t, 73 Amateur 
Radio Magazine. WOE Center^ Peterborough NH Q:U5H i&JS- 
525-42011 



May 77 
May 77 
Jul 77 
Jul 77 
Jul 77 
Dec 77 
Dec 77 
Feb7S 
Jul 78 
Aug 78 
Sep 7S 
Sep 7S 
Oct 78 
Nov 78 
Nov 78 
Nov 78 
jAii 79 
Jan 79 
May 79 
Jun79 
Nov 79 
Nov 79 
Jan SO 
Feb 80 
Mar m 
Mar^O 
Apr 80 
jun 80 

Jul 80 

Jul 80 
Jul 80 
Aug 80 
Sep 80 
Mar 82 
JuJ82 
Dec S2 
Feb 83 
Feb %^ 



60 73 Amateur Radio * October. 1988 



r" 



■*^ 




29th ANNUAL 

TROPICAL HAMBOREE 

A.R.R.L FLORIDA STATE CONVENTION 

FEBRUARY 4-5, 1989 

TAMIAMI PARK FAIR GROUNDS 
10901 S.W. 24th Street (Coral Way), Miami, Florida 

HOURS: 9 A.M.-5 P M SATURDAY • 9 AM -4 ?hh SUNDAV 




FREE PARKING 15,000 VEHICLES 

1,000 INDOOR SWAP TABLES 

300 CAMPSITES WITH FULL HOOKUPS 



200 COMMERCIAL EXHIBIT BOOTHS 
COMPUTERS & SOFTWARE 
LICENSE EXAMS 



Registration: S5.00 Advance — S6.0G Door. Valid Both Days. (Advance deadline January 30th.) 

Swap Tables, 2 Days: SI 6.00 each. Power: $10.00 per User. 

All swap table holders must have registration ticket. 

Campsites: SI 2.00 per Day • Includes Water, Power, Sanitary Hookups & Showers. 

(All RV vehicles, tent campers, vans, trailers wefcome — no ground tents, please.) 

Make Checks for Registration, Swap Tables & Campsites Payable to: 

Dade Radio Club & Mail As Follows: 

Tickets & Hotel Info Only: Evelyn Gauzcns, W4WyR, 2780 N.W. 3rd St., Miami, FL 33125 

Swap Tables, RV, Tickets & Hotel: John Hall. WD4SFG, 8670 S.W. 29th St., Miami, FL 33155 

RV & Tickets Only: Dick Leisy, W400H. 650 W. 63rd Dr., Hialeah, FL 33012 

Exhibit Booth & General Info: Evelyn Gauzens (address above) or Call (305)642-4139 or (305) 233-0000 

(BROCHURE WITH FULL DETAILS AVAILABLE DECEMBER 1st) 



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ARRL Southeast DIVISION CONVENTION 

Curtis Hixon Convention Center, Tampa FL 

NOV 19, 20 1988 

Major Distributors, Forums, FCC Exams, 

Luncheon, Dinner Dance. 62.000 sq. feet of 

3ir conditioned exhibit space for dealers, 

swap tables. 

Convention Hotel 

Holiday inn, Ashley Plaza 

$42 sgl/dbl, 2 blocks No. 

Call 813-223-1351 

or write address below for reservations, 

Pre-register: Admit $6. Tables $15 both 

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62 73 Amateur RMio • October, 1988 



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FECIAL EVENTS 

Ham Doings Across the Country 



HUNTINGTON WV 
0CT1 

The Tfi-State Amateur Radio 
Association, Inc.. is sponsormg 
the T.A.R.A, Hamfest '88 and 
Computer Fair at Ihe Huntingtori 
Civic Center, from 9 AM to 4 PM. 
Admission, $4. Forjms, VE testing, 
giant flea market, dealers, all in- 
doors. No stairs for handicapped. 
TaJk-in, 146. 16/. 76- Contact Charley 
Shumaker N8IKP. PO Box 4120, 
Huntington WV 25729; 304-523- 
5264. 

WARfllNGTON PA 
OCT 1 -2 

Mt. Airy VHP ARC. the Pack Rata, 
Invite afl amateurs and friends to the 
12th Annual Mid-Atlantic VHP Con- 
ference on Oct. t. and to the 17th 
Annual Hamarama on Oct 2. Ad- 
vance registfation for the confer- 
ence IS S5, S6 at door. This tficludes 
admissfon to the flea market. Fiea 
market only Is $4, $7 per carload. 
Selling spaces. S6each. Gate opens 
at 6 AM; bring your own tables. 
Send payment to Hamara/na '88, 
PO Box 311, Southhampton 
PA 18966. Contact Pat Cawttiome 
WB3Dm at2l5S72-5289. 

WICHITA KB 
OCT 1-2 

The Wichita ARC will host the 
annual ARRL Kansas convention 
at the Red Coach Inn. Doors open 
at 9 AM. admission $5 pre-reg- 
istered, S6 at door. Huge mdoor 
flea market, commerciat displays, 
technical seminars, meetings, 
banquets, prizes, Woutt Hong cere- 
mony, entertainment. Tatk-tn on 
146,82 for out-of4own hams. 146.94 
for local hams. For advance regis- 
tration, contact Vern Helnsohn 
WA0ZWW, 950 Back Bay, Wichita 
KS 67203. 

BENTON HARBOR Ml 
OCT 2 

The 1988 ■"Biossonf^fand Blast" 
will be from 8 AM to 4 PM at Lake 
Michigan Colfege. f-94 Exit 30, East 
to Yore Road, North to entrance. For 
info, write "Bfast, '^ PO Box 175, St. 
Joseph Mt 49085. 

HAMMOND IN 
OCT 2 

The Lake County ARC is spon- 
soring its I6th annual Hamfest at 
the Hammond National Guard 
Armory, Limited tables, $5 each. 
Admission, S3. 50. Set up, 6 AIV1. 
VE testing. ARRL. ARES. MARS 
information available. Tatk-in on 



the Lake County ARC repealer H7 
or 146.52 simplex. Contact Lucy 
Schendera N9DTG, 812 E. 40th 
Place. Griff m, IN 46319. 2 f 9-923- 
4873. 

ROCKFORD IL 
OCT 2 

The ARRL Illinois Slate Con- 
vention will be held in conjunction 
wilh the Rockford Hamfest*88/ 
Computer Fair from 9 AM to 4 PM at 
the National Guard Armory- ARRL 
forum, ham and computer talks, 
technical demonstrations, commer- 
cial exhibits, targe flea market 
(tables S7 in advance, $10 at door), 
and VE exams. Tickets $3 in 
advance, $4 at door, Talknn on 
146.01/. 61, 223-68/224.28. and 
146.52 simplex. For seller informa- 
tion, contact Roger Sawveli KD9MO 
at 815-633^520^ For generat mfo, 
Jtm M tiler W4JR, at 615-397-4602^ 
Send SASE for reservations to 
Rockford Hamfest, PO Box 10003, 
Rockford IL 61 131. 

ROME GA 
OCT 2 

The Rome hamfest sponsored 
by the Coosa Valley ARC. Inc., 
will be at the Rome Civic Center, 
Admission, free. Inside tables^ S6; 
outside spaces, S2. Homemade 
Bar-B-Q and stew, camper parking, 
no hookups, VE exams, drawings, 
bingo, contests, prizes. Reser- 
vations requested. watk*tns 
OK. Contact James WD4JHf or 
Linda WD4JHG Sineath, 1124 
New Rosedate Rd,, HE Armuchee. 
GA 30 1 05, 404^291 9767. 

SPRINGFIELD OH 
OCT 2 

The Independent Radio Associa- 
tion wilt hold the 6th Ajinual Spring- 
field Hamfest and Computer Expo at 
the Clark County Fairgrounds from 8 
AM to 4 PM. All vendor and swap- 
meet activities indoors. Admission, 
S3 (advance, $2). Tables. $7 (ad- 
vance, $6). Talk- in on 145.45 and 
224.28 MHz. Write the lr}d0pendent 
Radio Association, PO Box 523, 
Springfield OH 45501 or calJ Gary 
WB3 YUC at 5 13^399^732. 

ST, CHARLES MO 
OCT 2 

St. Peters ARC'S 4th Annual 
Swapfest will be in McNair Park Day 
Care Center from 6 AM to 2 PM. 
Admission $^ to buy or selL Door 
prizes. Taik-in on 145.41 repeater 
and 146.52 simplex. Call Allen 
Underdown at 314-723-4200. 



WEST LIBERTY I A 
OCT 2 

The Muscatine and Iowa City 
ARC is having their Southeast Iowa 
Hamfest at the West Liberty Pair- 
grounds. Gate opens at 7 AM. Ad- 
vance admission, S3; at door, $4. 
Register for exams as soon as possi- 
ble With Tom Krainer KECY, 905 
Leroy St., Muscatine lA 52761: 
$19*264*3259^ For table reserva- 
tions, contact Ken Kucera KA0Y\ 
RR2 Box 52A. Riverside lA 52327; 
319'648'5037. Ta[k-in on 146,25/ 
.86. 146,31/.91. 

VONKERSNY 
OCT 2 

The Yonkers ARC is sponsodrig 
the Electronics Fair and Giant Plea 
Market a! the Yonkers Municipal 
Parking Garage from 9 AM to 3 PM. 
Two floors of new and used equip- 
ment, hourly prizes, giant auction, 
live demonstrations. Admission, $3. 
Sellers. $8 per parking space. Bring 
tables. Talk-in on 146.865m. 
440.160/R. and 146.52 YARC 53 
Hayward Si, Yonkers NY 10704; 
914-969-1053. 

HARLINGENTX 
OCT 7-S 

The South Texas Amateur Re- 
peater Society (STARS) is sponsor- 
ing the commemorative station 
NSCAF to celebrate Ihe Confederate 
Air Force's annual Air Show in Har- 
Itngen. They will attempt to contact 
WWII aircraft in the CAP inventory. 
Listen for operation from a B-29, B- 
17, B-25, P-51 , P*40, etc. Station op- 
eration from 8 AM to e PM on SSB 
frequencfes 14260, 21360, and 
28460* For certificate QSL. send 
QSL and SASE to Dr. David Woof- 
weaver K5RAV. 2210 S 77 Sun- 
Shine Strip, Hartingen TX 7S550. 

STRATFORD CT 
OCT 8 

The Stratford ARC will operate 
W10RS from 1 300Z to 1 9002 to cel- 
ebrate the club's 50th anniversary. 
Suggested frequencies, lower third 
of the General 40. 20, 15 meier 
bands and the Novice portion of 10 
meters. For certificate, send QSL^ 
contact number, and 8V^'x 11' 
SASE (2 units of postage, piease) to 
KAiJKT, 307 Park Street, Stratford 
CT 06497. 

POTEAU OK 
OCT 8-9 

Th# Fort Smith (Arkansas) Area 
ARC will operate special event 
station W5ANR m conjunction with 
the 2nd Annual Green Country 
Sorghum Festival in Poteau, Okla- 
homa. Operation is from 1400- 
230OZ the eth and 140O-220OZ the 
9th in the lower 30 kHz of the general 
phone bands. 28.435 in Kovice 



phone, and 145,01 on packet. For 
cdftificate, send QSL and SASE to 
PSA ARC, W5ANR. Box 32. Fan 

Smith AR 72902-0032. 

LANSING Ml 
OCT 9 

The Central Michigan ARC and 
the Lansing Civil Defense Repeater 
Association are sponsormg Ham* 
Fair '88 from 8 AM to 3 PM in the 
Lansing Civic Center's Exhibition 
Hall. Vendors, spacious flea market, 
plenty of tables available ($1.50 
per foot). Admission. $3.50. Talk-in 
frequencies are 14S.39 and 146,94. 
Contact Rowena Elrod KA80B$, 
tit Lancelot Place, Lansing Ml 
48906; 517-482-9650^ 

LIMA OH 
OCT 9 

The Northwest Ohio ARC witi 
hold their annual Hamfest at the 
Allen County Fairgrounds. Set up 
after 3 PM Saturday, all night se- 
curity provided. Tickets, $3.50 
advance; $4 at door. Tables $8, 
halt-table $4. Exams all (evels, Fonn 
61 with copy of present license with 
SASE to W8TY 1370 Stevick Rd., 
Lima OH 45307. Tickets and table 
reservations. SASE to WD8BND, 
PO Box 211, Lima OH 45802; 419- 
647-6513. Taik-in on 146,67/.07, 
147. 03/, 63, 444.925/449.925. 
Ait areas at Hamfest handicap 
accessible. 

QUEENS NY 
OCT 9 

The Hall of Science ARC Hamfest 
will be at the New York Hall of Sci- 
ence parking lot in Flushing Meadow 
Park. Doors open at 9 AM. Set up 
is after 7:30 AM. Amateur radio 
exhibit station, tune-up clinic, frlms. 
Admission, $3, Sellers. $5 per 
space. Talk-in on 144.300 simplex 
hnk 223.600 repeat, and 445.225 
repeat. Call Steve Greenbaum 
WB2KDG, nights, at 718-893-5599 
orArnie Schiffman WB2YXB at 718- 
343-0172 or write Stephen Green- 
baum, 85-10 34th Ave., Jackson 
Hgts.. New York NY 1 137^. (Rain 
Date Oct 16) 

SYRACUSE NY 

OCT 15 

The Radio Amateurs of Greater 
Syracuse will hold their 33rd Ham- 
fast in the Arts and Home Center at 
the New York State Fairgrounds 
ffom 9 AM 10 5 PM. Tech-talks, con- 
tests, entertainment, giant mdoor 
flea market (S6 per table), commer- 
cial vendors. Taiigating area ($3 per 
car). Admission, S4. Pre-fegister for 
FCC exams by October 7. Send 
SASE if you need Form 610. Talk-in 
on 146. 31/. 91 and 147.90/.30. For 
more information, call Ed Swiat- 
lowskf WA2URK. at 3 15-437-34 1 7 or 



73 Amateur Radio • Octot>er, 1988 63 



Vt¥ Dougias WA2PUU, at 3 T 5^*69- 
0590 or write RAGS. PO Sox 88. 
Uverpooi NY J3088. 

ROCK HILL SO 

OCT 16 

The York County AaS will hold 
their 37tn Annual Hamfesl at the 
Joslyn Park, Museum Road. Admis- 
sion, S3 in advance or S4 at gate. 

Talknn on 147.03/6 43 MHz. For 
tickets or information, contact Frank 
Bateman N4HRP, PO Box 414^ 
CBS, Rock Hifi SC2973h 

WEBSTER NY 
OCT 22 

The XeroK Amateur Radio Qub 
will operate KE2T ffom OOOZ to 
2400Z to commemorate the 50tti An- 
niversary of I he Invention of Xerog- 
raphy by Chester Cafison Phone 
operation will be in the lower 25 kHz 
Of the general 60, 40, 20, 15, and 10 
meter bands, and the Movice portion 
of the 10 meter band; CW, 50 kHz 
above the iower band edges. For 
certificate, send QSL and a busi- 
ness-size SASE to KARC. Building 
337, Joseph C. Wilson Center for 
Technofogy. 800 Phmps Rd,, Web- 
ster NY 14580. 

KALAMAZOO Ml 
OCT 23 

The Southwest Michigan Amateur 
Radio Team and the Kalamazoo 



ARC are sponsoring the 6th annual 
Kalamazoo Hamfesi at Kalamazoo 
Central High School. Sellers set up 
at 6 AM . Doors open at 8 AM . TaJk4n 
on 147. 64/. 04 repeater, Forums, 
walk-in VE testing at 9 AM. Admis- 
sion S3, $2 in advance. Tables, $6. 
Send requests and payment before 
October 1 to Gary Hazelion KB8PL, 
67332 32nd St,. Lamon Mf 49065, 
Checks payable to Kalamazoo Ham- 
Jest. 

LONDON ONTARIO 
OCT 23 

The London Amateur Radio Club 
Flea market will take pEace at the Pot 
of Gold Bingo Palace from 9 AM to 2 
PM. Admission is $3, vendors $4/ 
table. Ta(Mn on VE3LAC 147.66/ 
147.06. Contact London Amateur 
Radio C/wi?, PO Box B2. Station B. 
London Oni NBA4V3. %DaveNQon 
VEStAE: 519*453-2292. 

GRANDVIEW MO 
OCT 29 

The Southside ARC *s sponsoring 
its Hamfest at the Grandview Jr. 
High from 8 AM to 4 PM, Swap 
tables, S7 (includes 1 tickel); exams, 
seminars. S2 per ticket, tour for S5 m 
advance, three for S5 at door. Talkin- 
in on 147:72/. 12. Contact Bouthside 
ARQ PO Box 1 742, Grandviev\^ MO 
64030 or cbU Walt NBQE; a! 816-763* 
9637. 



MINNEAPOLESMN 
OCT 29 

The Minnesota Hamfesi 8^ Com- 
puter Expo will be at the Hennepin 
Technical Institute, It will feature 
guest speaker Roy Neal K6DU E , for- 
mer NBC Science and Space Shut- 
tle Correspondent. Packet demon- 
strations- ARRL forum, new and 
used equipment, giant flea market ^ 
VE exams, and a CW contest- TaJk- 
in is on 146,16/76, Admission S4 in 
advance. S5 at door. Regarding VE 
exams, contact Ron Schulz NA0U, 
6308 Peacedaie Ave., Edina MN 
55424; 61 2-920-7473 SASE and 
check for $4,55. For advance tickets 
and information, contact Minnesota 
Hamfest & Computer Expo. PO Box 
$598, Hopkins MN $53^3, or cait 
Mike Sigefmarj K08UD at 612-542- 
8450. 

CHATTANOOGA TN 
OCT 29-30 

The 10th Annual Hamfest Chat- 
tanooga Amateur Radio and Con>- 
puter Convention will be at the Con- 
ventton and Trade Center, it 
features exams (apply by Oct. 20}* 
indoor exhibilor and flea market dis- 
plays (tables $l0/day. $l5/both 
days), forums. Free admission. 
Group rates for lodging. For addi- 
tional information, write Hamtest 
Chattanooga, PO Box 3377. Chat- 



tanooga TN 37404 For Exhibitor ir>- 
formation, call Barbara Gregory 
WA4RMC at 61$^92-a&89: for flea 
market information, call Terry Davis 
KB4TZ at 615-886^6812. 

KINGSTON OK 
OCT 29-30 

The Texoma Ham ar am a Assoc ia- 
tion is sponsoring the Oklahoma 
State Convention in conjunction with 
TEXOMA HAMARAMA ^88 from 8 
AM to 5 PM on the 29th, and from 8 
AM until noon on the 30th. Equip- 
ment dealers^ flea market ^ technical 
forums, ARRL activities, auction, ex- 
ams, Wouff Hong Ceremony, ban* 
quet and dance, OCWA breakfast. 
Special rates at lodge {call 40S-564' 
2311). For more information, contact 
fejfoma Hamarama Association, 
PO Box 610892, DFW Airport TX 
7526 1 or cait Dave Cox NB5N. ai 
918-250-2285. 

MARION OH 
OCT 30 

The Marion Amateur Radio Club 
will hold its 14th Annual Heart of 
Ohio Ham Fiesta from 0800Z to 
1600Z al the Manon Coiinty Fair- 
grounds Coliseum. Tickets $3 in ad- 
vance. S4 at door. Tables. $5. 
Check-In on 146.52 or 147.90/30. 
For information, tickets, or tables, 
contact Ed Margraff KD80C 1989 
Weiss A¥e., Marion OH 43302: 614- 
382^2608. 



Index: October 1988 



Issue #337 



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64 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



UNCLE WAYNE $ 
CODE TAPE$ 



W e've had so many phone calls from people 
wafiLJng our famous 73 code i;jpes ihai we*vc 
decided to brmg iheni back! ixn 't ii abtjut time 
you dust offihat keyer and shaqjen up ytmr 
code skitts? Order now, , . 



// 



Genesis" 



5 tt^iii-Tbis Ls the begirminglape. taking you 
through the 26 letten*, 10 number?* and neces- 
sary punctuiitiim. complete v^ ith practice ev- 
ery &iep of the w«iy. The ea$c of learning 
gives confidence even to the faini of heart. 



"The siieKler 



it 



6+ wpm-This ui the pnicftcc tape for ihi^^e 
v\ ho survived the 5 wpm tape, and it's d\m the 
[ape for the Novice ami Technician Ncen.scs. 
Ii is comprised of on^ Siilid hour of code. 
Chanicter^ are ^nt at 13 wpm and <;paced at 5 
wpm* Code groupvS are entirely random char- 
acters sent in groups of live— dc Unite iy not 
nwmorizable! 

"Bach Breaker" 

IJ-t- wpm-Code groups again* at a brisk 
B+ wpm so you II be really at ease when 
you sit down in front ofy .steely -eyed volun- 
teer examiner who stuns sending you plain 
language at only 13 per, YtuiUl necil this 
extra margin to overcome the sheer panic 
universal in mcKst test situations. Yoifve 
come this far, so don't yet code shy now! 



ff 



Courageous 



ft 



20+ wpm^Congratulaiions! Okay, the chal- 
lenge of etxle is what's gotten you this far, so 
don 't quit now . Go for the Extra class license. 
We send the code faster ihan 20 per. ITs like 
wearing lead weights on your feel when you 
run; ycMj'U wonder why the c^aminc^ is send- 
ing so slowly! 



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coae Tapes 



Genesis S6.95 

The Stickler $6.95 

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Mail your ofdef to 7J Magazine. 
WGE Center. Pelertwrixigh NH 0345S 



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Official 1934 

SHORT WAVE 

RADIO MANUAL 



Build 

simple, high- 
performance old 
time shortu-ave radios! 

All of the secrets are 
here: the circuit diagrams, 
parts lay o tit. coil specifications, con- 
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much more! 

This is a compilation of shortwave 
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30 s. It's wall-to-wall "how to," 

Included arecirruit diagrams, photo- 
graphs, and design secrets of all short- 
wave receivers being manufactured in 
1934 Including some of the most fa* 
mous: SW-3, the SW-5 "Thrill Box", the 
deForest KR-l, the Hammurland 
"Comet Pro", and many more. 

Also included is a new chapter show- 
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place hard- to -II nd vacuum tubes. You 11 
even see the circuit that was lashed 
together on a table lop one night using 
junk box parts* a hair curler and alUga- 
tor clips. Attached to an an- 
tenna strung across the base- >t|i 
ment ceiling and a 9 volt bat- L^ 
teiy, signals started popping Jj 
in Hke crazy. In a couple of ^ 
minutes an urgent message ^^ 
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was heard asking lur a naviga- 
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These small regeneraUve receivers 
are extremely simple, but do they ever 
perform I This is a must book for the 
experimenter, the survivallst who is 
concerned about basic communication, 
shortwave hsteners, ham radio opera- 
tors who collect old receivers, and just 
atxjut anyone interested In old-Ume 
radio. 

Great book! Fun to read I One of the 
best old-time radio books to turn up In 
years. Heavily illustrated! Order a copy 
today! 8 1 /2 x 11 paperback 260 pages 
only "S 1 5. 70 postpaid! 

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Box 12'WB1, Bradley IL 60915 ' 

|~| Send a copy of Short Wave Radio 
Manual Enclosed is $15,70. 

Chk, MC, Visa. Send a free cata- 
log of other books. 



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CIRCLE 157 ON READER SERVICE C4RD 



73 Amateur Radio • October. 1988 65 



KENWOOD TS940 OWNERS 

Are you frustrated tuning in SSB & CW stgnaJs 

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Khz/revolulion??? 

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Speed exceeds 2 lums p&r second to mako the long 

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*Splii dot CW prottlem^ solved 
•Easy to rnstall (s imply remove itie dd \C chip from tts 

socket and pJug in the new Giehl Elytron ics \C chip). 
•Complete ir^struclions 

Send check or money order for $25 lo: 

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and detail* Postage appreciated. 

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Now you can get the highest quality QSL cards without 
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Not that we skimp: All tliree styles are produced in two 
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P*!f-rtiis5if>Ti granted tn phnf <xt)ifiry 






Hams A ts 



Number 23 on your Feedback canf 



Andy MacAllister WA5ZfB 
14714 Knightsway Drive 
Houston. TX 77083 

It Works! 



AMSAT-OSCAR'13 is proving 
to bo the ffne&t amateur satellite 
ever. The design and construction 
groups around the world deserve 
oyr thanks, an extra pat on the 
back, and our continuing support 
with their ambitious projects for 
the future. 

Work is underway in West 
Germany on Phase 3D. a more 
powerful version of OSCAR 13. 
Phase 3D will resemble a large 
doughnut over six feet in diameter 
and three feet thick. In addition to 
its hamsat duties, it will also be 
part of (he adapter nng to mate an 
Anane launcher to its main pay- 
load. Launch is expected some- 
time in the mid-1990s. The pro- 
posed orbit will again be highly 
elliptical, like that of OSCAR 13. 

Geostationary Sats 

Here in ih^ States, studies have 
been goirrg on for several years in 
preparation for the first geosta* 
tJonary, or Phase 4 satellite. Al- 
though current designs are very 
similar to the Phase 3D configura- 
tion from AMSAT-DL, the anten* 
nas, stabilization and station- 
keeping systems differ greatly. 

Antennas on Phase 3 satellites 
produce gain perpendicular to the 
upper surface of the structure. 
Phase 4 antennas will be yagi and 
helix types with a perpendtcuiar 
orientation to the solar panel 
faces. 

While current amateur satellites 
are spin-stabilized, the Phase 4 
series will require a different 
method. Commercial TV satellites 



Amateur Radio Via Satellite 



use high-gain dishes aimed at 
North America. The dish is sta- 
tionary relative to tts target area 
and the satellite is stabilized with 
either a rotating body or a fly- 
wheel. Both methods are complex 
ar>d expensive. Phase 4 salellites 
will be held steady by magnetic 
fluids pumped through tubing po- 
sitioned around the satellite's pe- 
riphery. There will be no moving 
parts, pumping will be achieved 
electrdmagnetically. 

Small steering jets will keep the 
satellite positioned above a 
specific point on the equator. All 
geostationary satellites require 
them. They are used to place the 
sateHite accuratefy and to counter 
drift relative to the earth's surface. 
The jets are designed to have suf- 
ficient propetlant to adow the 
satellite to be moved to new loca- 
tions around the geostationary 
bell. Additionally^ they provide 
station-keeping for the expected 
Nfe of the satellite. Phase 4 will 
require only sufficient fuel for ini* 
tial positioning to maintain orbit 
for the satellite's Ufet^me. 

Unlike the commercial TV satet- 
lltes beaming only at the United 
States, a single Phase 4 satellite 
in the proper position wifl provide 
access to anyone who can "see" 
it. The first will likely be placed 
over the mid-Atlantic for hams in 
North and South America, west- 
ern Europe, and parts of Africa, To 
a ground observer, the Phase 4 
sateltite will always appear as a 
stationary object in the Sky with 
beam antennas aimed earthward. 



Back To The USSR 

On other fronts, new RS satel- 
lites from the Soviet Union are an* 
ticipated, Look for the launch of 




RS-12/13 during the summer of 
1989. It will be similar to RS- 10/11 
with modes A (two meters up and 
10 meters down), K (15 meters up 
and 10 meters down) and T {15 
meters up and two meters down). 
A new more advanced RS (14?) is 
also in the works. Although launch 
is not expected until the earJy 
1990s, its transponder package 
will be ambitious. Several modes 
are expected with B (70 cm up and 
two meters down), J (two meters 
up and 70 cm down) and others 
yet to be defined. 

Here m the western hemisphere 
a new short-term program is 
underway to build four small 
satellites for launch in late 1989 
by Arianespace. They will be 
secondary payloads with the 
French SPOT- 2 mission. A MS AT 
North America reports that the 
ort)its will be sun-synchronous, 
like UoSAT's 9 and 1 1 . with a 98.7 
degree rnclrnation and an altitude 
of 822 kilometers- 




Pholo 8. The azimuth rotator went 
in the attic with a2x3 between the 
rafters for a thrust bearing. 

Get On The Stick 

Many an AMSAT Area Coordi- 
nator has heard the words. '\'\\ 
wait for you guys 10 get a satellite 
up with the right orbit," or, ''When 




Photo C. WA5ZiB and WA5WOD fine tune element alignment on the 70 
cm antenna. 



Photo A, WA5WOD and WA5TWT begm instailing antennas along the 
fiberglass boom. 



The U.S., Argentina, Braiil.and 
Canada are involved in design. 
Two of the satellites are to carry 
packet radio store-and-forward 
systems (U.S. and Argentina), 
one will have a downlink-only 
voice synthesizer (BrazN) and the 
fourth will carry a low-resolution 
CCD (charge-coupled device) TV 
camera from CAST, the Center for 
Aerospace Technology, at Weber 
State College in Ogden, Utah. 

The satellites have been 
dubbed 'microsats" due to their 
small size (9 inches on a side) and 
low weight (typically 22 pounds 
each). 

Construction has begun in 
Boulder. Colorado. The microsat 
program continues AMSAT's 
nearty 20-year tradition of spon- 
soring small amateur radio pay- 
loads. 



you get a geostationary satellite in 
orbit I might get interested/' Now 
is the time to get involved. 

There has never been a better 
moment for amateur satellite ac- 
tivity. OSCAR 13 is the embodi- 
ment of a decade-old program to 
place a hamsat into an orbit favor- 
ing the major population centers 
of the worid. Alihough tentative 
launch dates are available for all 
of the satellites of the future^ de* 
lays occur. Our space shuttle pro- 
gram is evidence of unforeseen 
pitfalls and their unfortunate ef- 
fects and interruptions. Looking 
forward to the endless possibili- 
ties of future amateur satellites is 
fine, but experience with today's 
satellites is a prerequisite. 

RS-10yi1, Fuji-OSCAR 12. OS- 
CAR 10. and OSCAR 1 3 have sev- 

Coatinued on page 69 



I 



73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 67 



"^M 



mt 



Number 24 on your Feedback card 




ARTER 'N' BUY 



QSLs TO OltOEA. Varwty ol 3iyte9. cokKs, 
Cafd Slock W4BPD QSU. PO Prawer DX. 
Cordova SC 2M39. BNaSBO 

7>^E DX'ERS MAGAZiNE Up-lo-dar*. infor^ 

mative. inle resting. Compiled flnd edited by 
Gus Browning W46PD, DXCC Honor floll 
Cyrillic ale 2-4. Send tor fwQ sample and 
subscoplion informallon today. PO Drawer 
D;<. Cordova SC 29039 6N6261 

OSU CAROS- Look good mtty lop quafity 
prmling. CfMxise siannlard dg^igns or fully 
eu^iomized cards. Betier cards mean mmrn 
re!uftis to you Free brochure, gambles 
StaiTif^ 3()preciaied. Chester QSU^. OepI A. 
31 Q Commercial. Eniporia K5 66801 
BNe434 

COUMODORE and AMIGA QHIPB Wottd- 
wtd0 Distribulion Low prices Power sup- 
plies, diagnostics, parts, etc. Kasara Mi- 
CfC$ysi^ms, Inc., 38 Murray HHl Drive, Spring 
Valloy. NY 10977 Call lOK tree 1-800-248- 

a&aa or 91 435631 3i bnbsss 

SUPERFAST WfORSE CODE SUPEREASY. 
Subliminal cassette. $10. LEARM MOi=tSE 
CODE IN 1 HOUR Amazing new supereasy 
toc^nique $10. Both $17 Moneyback gyar- 
ftfilee. Free catalog: SASE Babr. Oepl 73-7, 
PO BoJt 15433, Riorar^cho. NM 87174. 
BNB531 

Sa-220 OWNERSt — Enhance perfm- 
manee^acM new futures, 14 t4ep4>yHStep 
mods wtiicb mchjde: tiiti^d^inpui & and t€iQ- 
mal«r operialKjn, heavy-durty power supply 
mods, toll QSK operation, solid-stale bias 
contra!, and many more. Source ot parts in- 
cluded One rime S0% rebaie tgr n*w rmids 
submitted and two Iree updates. 10 pages of 
lech mfo on Ihe 3-50O2 Order today— $1 per 
copy pius S1 postage SASE for into. Bob 
Koilcirek WA2SQO, 69 Momonal Place, Elm- 
wood Park NJ 074^7 BNBSSI 

MARCO: Medical Amaleur R^io Counctl op- 
ef ales daily and Sunday nets Medically on- 
enred amaieijrs {phys<ians. dentists, veten- 
piafians. nurses, tHerap^ts eic f invited to 
Kvn For oiformaf K>n. wnle MARCO. Box 73's, 
Acme. PA S6KJ. 9NBai2 



WRITTEN EXAMS SUPEHEASY. Memory 
a»ds horn psyctiologist/efigir>eer cut study- 
time 50% Novice. Tech, Gen $s eacti. Ad- 
vanced. EKira $10eact^ MoneytiBCkguaraA- 
tee Bat\f, Dep! 73-7, PO Box 15433. Rio 
Rancbo. NM 97174. BNB624 

COMMUNICATIONS BATTERIES NiCd 
Packs/lnsertsyRebuildtng. EJtact Replace- 
ment Packs: Yaesu FNB2 / Wilson eP4 
$22.^5. S«nEec 1:4^442^3 pin} $23 95, Mo^ 
torola HiaSO-Slim $29 95. HT220-Omm 
$34SS, GE: PE/MVP $40,73. RCA TacTec 
$59,95. Battery Inserts: I COM @P2/Rap 
StS 95. 6P3CM3 Sie 95 BPSmap S24 95. 
BP7/BPamap $23 95. Kenwood Pe2f 
S13 95, Pe24 $21 95, PB25 S24 95 25H/26 
$25 95. Azden 3O0 $21 %. Tempa 51/270 
$23 95. S1^4.5J450 $23.3^. St5 $24 95, 
Yaesu FNB3 $$2.95. FNB4/4A $33.95. Ten- 
Tec 2991 $24 95. Standard 8P1 S35 95. Re- 
gency 1000 S21 95, 3XAA Pack $5 75, Re- 
byildifig: fCOM/Ken/Yeasu/T-T add $4 00 to 
insert prices. Ottiers available. SASE/free 
cataldg. In PA add 6% Add $3 Shipping/or- 
der CUNARD ASSOCIATES. OepI 7, R.0.6 
Box 104, Bedford PA T5S22. BNB62S 

ROSS S$$S MEW OCTOBER SPCCIAtS: 
KENWOOD TS-930SWAT $179990. TM^ 
2530A $399 90. TM-22tA $369 90. SM220 
$394 90. ETO 76A $1639 90. ALlNCO EP- 
2010 $99 99, AEA PK-64S/HFW St 49 90, 
ICOM fC-47lH$999 90. IC'47lA$734 90, IC- 
38A $389,9Q>. PS-&5 $184 90. 10-900 
$539 90. YAESU FT^270I?H $304 90. FT- 
23nTT $287 90. FT.747GJ( $729 90 All 
LTO ^Limited TTrro Offer) LOOKING FOR 
SOMETHING NOT LISTED''? CALL OR 
WRITE . Over 8780 tiam- related items in slock 
tor immediate shipment Msnuon ad Prices 
cash, F.O.B PRESTON, WE CLOSE AT 200 
SATURDAYS &. MONDAYS ROSS DIS- 
TRIBUTING COMPANY, 78 SOUTH STATE, 
{P.O. Box 234A) PRESTON ID 83263 (209) 
852-0830. BN8654 

K1BV DX AWARDS DIRECTORY. Cdrflflleie 
rutes for over 830 certificates. 99 countries 
200 paQes $ 14.60 Postpaid, Ted Melinosky. 
525 Fostef St , South Windsor CT 06074- 
2936 eNe672 



r 



Barter N' Buy adverlising must pertain to ham radio produc!s or services. 

Glndrvidual (noncommercial) , SSc per wgrd 

GCommercial ,.«,,,,,»,,.. .<««*.* GD*^ per word 

Prepayment required. Count only the words in the lexi. Your address Is 
free. 73 cannot verify adYertising claims and cannot be held responsibie 
for cfaims made by the advertiser. Liability will be limited to making any 
necessary correctjons in the next available issue. Please print clearly or 
type (double-spaced). 



n 



t 

L 

68 



No discounts or commissions are available. Copy must be received in 
PeierboroLigh by the first of the second month preceding the cover date. 
Make checks payable to 73 Magazine and send to: Hope Currier. Barter 
■N' Buy, 73 Magazine, WGE Center, Peterborough NH 034 SB. 

73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



COMPUTER CODE PROGRAM. New. B«St 
value Does evsryihrng' Fiee details SASE 
Batif. DepI 73-7. PO dox 15433, R»o Ranctw. 
NM 87174 BH8631 

CHASSIS AND CABINET KITS SASE: 
K3IVVK. 5120 Harmony Grove Road. Dover 
PA 17315 BNBG98 

CALL SIGN BADGES Cystom license plal© 
holders. Personal. d35l:inctive Club di&- 
counls SASE WB3GND, Box 750, CNnton 
MD £0735. 301-£4B'7302. BNQ699 

ROSS $£$$ USED OCTOBER SPECIALS: 
KENWOOD TS 930S SI 249.90, TB-95O0 
$459.90. TR*8400A $229.90, TH-415A 
$309 90. T S99D & R-599D $549.90 AMER- 
ITRON AL-1200 $1199.90, iCOM K>471A^ 
PS^as S679.90. IC-471H ^29-90, IC-27IM/ 
PS-35 $799 90. TEW-TEC 2510 $369 90. 
COLLINS G0-6C $299.95. F-250 $200.00 
LOOKING FOR SOMETHING NOT LIST- 
ED?? CALL Ofi WRETE V^ HAVE OVER 
3t5 USED ITEMS in stoc»c M^NTtON AD 
PRICES CASH FOB PRESTON WE CLOSE 
AT 2:00 SATURDAYS ft MONDAYS ROSS 
DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 78 SOUTH 
STATE, PD BOX 234A. PRESTON iD 
B3263: 2OB-B52*0B30 BNS709 

DIGITAL AUTOMATIC DISPLAYS All ra- 
dios GRAND SYSTEIVIS. POB 3377, Dep't A, 
Siaine. Washington 98230. BNB728 

DIGICOM >e4:C64PACKETSee AUG 88 73 
Ma^iittw (by W?UP^ to( cinuiit and soHware 
details, or *rite us for more inlQ. Order #i 54, 
KIT tof kit with dfsc at $49 95 or *t 54 ASV tot 
assembled board aiid disc at $79.95 Add 
$2-50 S&H per ofder A 4 A Ertgmeering^ 
^21 W La Palma. 0K. Anaheim, CA 92801. 
714-952-2114 eN8732 

HAM TBADER YELLOW SHEETS, in our 
27th year Buy, Swap, Self ham radio gear. 
Published twice a month Ads quickly circu- 
late-no long wall lor re&uJts. Send #10 SASE 
for sample copy. Si 3 for one year (24 issues). 
P.O.B 2057, G(©n Ellyn, IL 60138-2057, 
BN67d1 

$$$$$ SUPER SAVINGS $$$$$ an electron- 
ic pajts, components, supplies and computer 
accessories Free ^O-pa^e calalog tor Sett 
Addressed & Stamped Envekipe. Get on our 
mailing Itst, BCD ELECTRO. P O Bo* 
830n9, Ricfiardson TX 75083 or calt 214- 
343-1770 BNB749 

HAM RADIO REPAIR, aft makes, models Ei- 
perieficed reliai>(e sofvice Robert Hail Elec- 
ironics. So« 280363, San Francisco, CA 
94128^363: 408-729-a2DD. BNB751 

HAM HOLIDAY m VP5 Join cycle 22 fyn from 
rare DX QTH Turks & Caicos Islands. We 
supply Iranscelvers, antenna, process i|i- 
cense and offer accomadations as low as 7 
nighla £390 each double occupancy in pri- 
vate bungalow Direcl Pan Am service. 90 
fnmute? Miamc Details VP5D, P O Sox 
100858, Ft LauderdaleFL 33310 SN8 760 

WANTED: Ham Equipment and othier propef- 
ty. The fad^o club of Junior Hi^ Sciiool 22 
HYC.inc cs a nonptofit csrgsnizatioii, grarrted 
501(CK3) slaluiby Itie IRS. ieicoeporatad with 
the goat ol using the theme ol ham radio to 
Funher and enhance itie education of yourig 
people Your property i:N>nat'ion of financial 
suppori would t>e greatly appreciated ar^d 
auk rowJ edged with a f@ceipt fof your tax 
deduciibte conUhbution. Your card is irvilnd 
tor oy r ' OSL ol lh§ Wfiok Award ' ' cornea I a nd 



pi^ase join ttm Olas&room Net" on 7.238 at 
7AM daily Contact WB2JKJ usmg the catt- 
boo)( or tetephon« St&-574-4072, 24 hours, 
seven days a wee«t. Thank you* BNB752 

19&8 "Btossom^lftrtd Blast" Sunday, Octo^ 
t»r 2. 1988. Wme Blasl. ' P,0. BoJt 175. 
SUoseph, MI490S5 6N8764 

INDIVIDUAL PHOTOFACT FOLDERS. ^1 to 
*1400. &4i)0. rf140l up. $6.00, Sams books. 
$7.00 Postpaid Aleen Loeb. 414 Chestnut 
Larte, Easi meaddow, NY 1 1654 BNS766 

VHP TO MICROWAVE: GaAsFETS, MMIC S. 
iransistors eic. SASE: WA31AC. 714S 
Montag;je St.. Philadelphia, PA 1 91 35. 

BNB771 

HAM PLAQUES YoufcaHsfgn custom irouied 
and finished m cedar. apf}fi»t. 4 x12. Petfeci 
lor wall or de^k UitvHfy l^ack guarantee. 
$t4 95 ea. plus ^50 postage. {In W1 add 
5^>. Send chack and OSl lo: Country Carver. 
PO Box 18727. Milwaukee. Wl 53218 
BNB772 

CALL LETTERS Attractive Magnetic Call Let- 
ter Strip for your caf in lieu of enpensive li- 
cense p4at6S. White on black with ietters ap- 
prox. 1 inch high. Send $9 -i- St shipping and 
handling with your call and address to Bob 
Johnson. P.O. Bov. 14305. Columbus. Qh 
432 U BNB773 

HAMLOG COMPUTER PROGRAM Fuff fea- 
tures. t7 TTVQdiiles Ai/to^logs. 7-banii WAS/ 
OXCC. A«]pte $19.95. IBM. CP/M. KAYPBO. 
TANDY, 0128 $24 95 73-KA1AWH. Pfl 
2015,Pe3i»dy.MA019eO BNB775 

LABORATORY Equipment. Elecifcmic Test 
Equipn^ni. Cornporvents. Unusual items 
-tndustnal and Government Surplus and 
pnced Cheap! Send SQc tor catalog to: 
Lehman Sclent tlic Et^uipmeni. R D 1, Box 
580, Wnghtsvrlle, PA 17388. BNB7&0 

WANTED: MILITARY SURPLUS RADIO 
EQUIPMENT WE NEED ARC-ie-l, ARC- 
114, ARC-115, ARC'116. ARC' 159, ARC- 
IBS. ARN-tlS. RT-T1S9A. APN-t71. GRR 
23, GRR-24. COLLINS GRC-lTl, 718U-5. 
719A. TOP DOLLAR PAID OR TRADE FOR 
NEW AMATEUR GEAR, WRITE OR PHOfaE 
BILL SLEP, 704^624-7519. SLEP EL£C^ 
TRONiCS C^JMPANY. HtGHWAV 411. OT- 
TO. NC 28763 BNB782 

SCARA tNDOOR HAM RADIO AND COM- 
PUTER FL£A MARKET Sunday, Novemt>er 
13. 1988 ai the Nonn Haven Park and Recre- 
ation Center, 7 Lir^s^y St , Nonh Haven, CT 
Se Hera ad mitted al 7 AM , Buyers 1 rom 9 AM to 
3PM. Tables are $12 in advance, SI 5 at the 
door. General: admission S3 per person. Tall^- 
In on 146.Q1/.G1. Reservations for rabies 
must be received with chec^ by Novemtier 3^ 
1988. and NO reaervakons by phone. For 
informati<jn or reservations, SASE 1o" SCARA 
Fleamari(eL PO Bon 81, North Haven, CT 
06473 or caJ^ between 7 PM and 10 PM Brad 
at 2!0^265-6478 BNB7e3 

DIGITAL RLTER 0£StGN PROGRAM fur 
OPTIMAL FIR ftltefs ot 3 to 128 Stages. PC/ 
Clones. Lists coefficients, plus Hst and p«ot o< 
frequency respor«se Wtth manual $45. 
SASE fof details Paul Setwa N89K, 81 E. 
Tilden Dr . Brownsburg. IN 461 12 BNB7S4 

FREE HAM EQUIPMENT, details SI. PO Box 
1631. Arvada, CO 60001. BNB7B5 



KITS' PARTS *PLAkS We have hard lo find 
parts' Variable Tuntng Capacitors, Tuning 
CoiU. GrysiaS and Magneiic Headphones, 
German ium Diodes, Cryistal and Shc^wsvo 
Radio Kits Yeary Communicatioris, 12922 
HaftKJf fSOO'B. Garden Grovft. CA 92$4D 
BNB7ae 

PAKHATT PK'64 mxh mar^ual New cortdi- 
lion 51 ?5. WOSJQU. 2122 Crumn&f ©., 
Eiifefgreen, CO 80435 BMB7S7 

GENERAL RADFO 1001 A SignaJ Generator, 
5 KH^-50 MHz. mfrare t&sl loop aniimna, 
S175 Ofl-lllSe Muiri-Frequ^ncy Standard. 
S2^ HP^8601 A AM/FM solid slate 1 10 MH; 
Si^nat^weep generator. S550 HP-1202A 
Lalj ScapB. lOOuV. Si 75 HP-140T SpecWtjm 
Anatyzer Display. $275. GB-161 1 A Cspect- 
tancc Bndge. SiSiO Tefctronuc P\u^-mB 1A1 
50 yHz Dual Trace FET inputs. $65, Type^ 
4^Trace. S75. Type^aa S75 Jenrold 602 
Swe&p^Gen. 4-112 MH; S60 New Tei?-475A 
fiignuai. S25 FO0 Joseph Cohen, 200 Wood- 
side. WinthfOp, AitA 02152. 6T7a4&€312 
BHBTBB 



ATTENTION COCO/FACItET USERS: Cd- 
Co Clipboard Magazme m the only CoCo 
magazme with a regular colufnn featuftng 
Amateuf Radio ancil t^ Cotor GfMnputef Plus 
each issue (S packed with practical arhO turn- 
n&ss appttcaiioria. SiS ior 6 issues (T year}, 
Sampie ccpy (maired isf cfass) fust S3 7S 
Check or nior>ey order to CoCtt CHpboarti 
^$agazine. D&m 73. 3742 US 20. Box 3. 
Fr^dor^ia. NV 14063 BNB7S9 

9 MHi HC-ie CRYSTALS Set ol 10, with 
specs & Qtbliography Build high pernor* 
mar^-e IF filter. OnFy S9.95 shi^pping induded 
HSC, 3500 Ryder Si , Sana Clara. CA 95051 . 
408-732- T 573 S NO 790 



QSLji: Quality at a reasonable price! 
SatHsfaciion Guaranieed Send $i tor 
samples and coupon worih S2 The Sugiarloaf 
Print Shop. PO Box 563, Sugartoaf, pA 
18249. BNB79t 

ELECTRON TUBES: All types a sizes Trans- 
mittjng Receiving, Mtcrowave ... Large irv 
veniofy - same day shipping. Ask about our 
3-SOOZ special Daily Etedronics, PO Box 
SOat Complon. CA 90224 800-346^6667. 
BNe792 

QUALITY HAM ^^SHAREWARE^' SOFT- 
WARE for the tBW-PC and compatiCOes 
Many disks for all bipeds ol ham radio Busi- 
rtess SASE for catalog JK&S. Dept S. P.O 
Box 5052t. iftrftanapDiis. IN 46250^JS2i 
BNB793 

KENWOOD 430s OWNERS! StDp Scan 
stops the scanner on busy frequenct^ re- 
sumes scanning autefnatk^ally after an ad- 
lostatHe 1-10 secorul delay. SASE fee 1989 
dd^og Sl9 95}tii S25 95assemtHed $350 
shipping JA0CO ELECT^OfJtCS, Rl Bwt 
386, Alexandi^a. IN 46001, BflB794 

VOICEGATE commiunicalions rtotse reduc- 
(ion wnti audio squelch, nc^se refiuciion, VOX 
cassette recorder centrnl. 3 a^usialMe audio 
fillers, & more^ SASE for 1989 caiakhg S3. 50 
tor demo tape. $109.95 complete (Ml 1/1/39) 
JABCO ELECTRONICS. Rl Box 356. Alejt- 
ancJrta. IN 4600i 0NB795 

il^ w- 

COLLfNS KW^SI TRANSMITTER A^^-SSB- 
CW serial MXOt 1 000 watts work f ng condilton, 
Sed or trade for t>est motorcycle offered Bilt 
M tiler. PO Box 441, LcwelL AB 72745 50 1 
6590982 BNB796 



MAXCOM 







MAXCOM AliTOMAHC ANTENfUA MATCHER 

\ 

PX. Box SO 2 

Ft. Leuiderilai*, FL 33301 

(305) 523-03e9 




CIRCLE 101 ON J?EAE>£f? SERVJCE CARD 



Continued from page 67 
eral transponders with many 
hours of operating tfme each day. 
Choose from the basic low-orbit 
mode A work on RS-11, to the 
highly technical RUDAK, the Ger- 
man packet-radio experiment us- 
ing mode L frequencies (23 cm up 
and 70 cm down) on OSCAR 1 3, 

In the middie ground are ihe 
VHF/UHF modes (B and J) on 
OSCAR 13, which are favored 
by most current and potential 
amateur satellite enthusiasts, tt 
is important lo find radios and 
anlennas to operate on these 
modes. 

Just a look at the advertise- 
ments m this magazine, or any 
other amateur radio pubfication, 
reveals many types of VHF and 
UHF all-mode transceivers. There 
are options with power output 
levels ranging from ten to neady 
100 watts and features from Ihe 
no-^rills basic mobile rig to com- 
plex bells-and-whistles base 
stations. For the majority, the 
problem is to find the most rig for 
tt>e least money. 

My own sysiem consists of ofd- 
er HF hgs used with transverters 
and power amplifiers. About 100 
watts is avarlable for the VHF and 
UHF uplinks. Preamps include 



GaAsFET. MOSFET and bipolar 
versions, depending on the band 
and incoming signal levels. When 
atmospheric or man-made noise 
is high, however, a preamp is 
much less useful— it amplifies all 
incoming signals, including the 
notse. 



Cushcraft, Telex/Hy-gain, and 
KLMAMirage. While the Cushcraft 
antennas do not include polar* 
izatlon switching or complete 
stainless-steel hardware, they 
are the least expensive. The KLM/ 
Mirage antennas, especially the 
22C for two meters and the 40CX 



''Phase 4 satellites 

will be field steady by 

magnetic fluids pumped 

through tubing around the 

satellite's periphery. " 



An uncomplicated setup and 
easy to operate components are 
key factors for enjoyable satellite 
chasing. My station includes 
many electronic boxes, but it's 
easy to use. 

Keep feedtines short to provide 
low loss. Belden 9913 provides 
the best cost-effective approach. 

Several individual antennas or 
OSCAR antenna packages are 
available from manufacturers. 
Names to took for include 



for 70 cm. provide all the gain 
and features needed, but the 
price is high. Telex/Hy-gain sateU 
lite antennas are perhaps the 
"best buy" since they have 
switching and the stainless hard- 
ware, but at a more palatable 
price. 

With my recent move, a change 
of antennas was in order. Deed 
restrictions would not allow a 
large array, t got one of the new 
antennas in a trade and bought a 

73 Amateur Radio * October. 1986 69 



second for a good price at a 
swap-meet. The system includes 
a 14 element crossed yagi for 
two meters by KLIM, a 38 element 
crossed yagi for 70 cm by Tonna, 
and a 45 element horizontally 
polarized ioop yagi for 23 cm 
from Down East Microwave. The 
two-meter antenna has circularity 
switching but the 70 cm antenna 
is hard-wired for right hand cir- 
cular to agree with most trans- 
ponders in the sky. Transmission 
line on all bands consists of 50 
fool runs of 9913. Ailhough 
changes will be needed for the 
mode L uplink, the rest of the 
system is performing remarkably 
well on OSCARS 1 and 1 3 

My signals through mode L are 
very weak. Power output to the 
9913 coax is about etghl watts. 
Improvements will include a small 
linear amplifier (30 to 40 watts), 
better feedlme(1i inch Heliax}aJid 
a crossed yagi tuned to 1269 
MHz. The current loop yagi was 
built for 1296 MHz. I may realize a 
ten dB improvement with these 
changes. In the meantime, I will 
settle for excellent DX and some 
great contacts through modes B 
and J via the highest repeater 
around 



Mumber 2S on your Feedback card 



DEALER DIRECTORY 




MASSACHUSETTS 



Burbmik 
Ncu HAM stnre open and ready to make a DHAL. 
Wc carry aE! lines, ship UPS. and are open Sunday. 
A-TBCH ELECTRONICS, 1033 Hollywood 
Way, Burbank CA^1S05; (»1 8)845-^203. 

San Diego 
Hard 10 11 nd parts /iiuipEu?vckcTmnics, standard line 
iteiDN. Hams, hobbyists, industnal prafessitmals— 
from nuls &. bolts lo laser diodes... Elcclronically 
speaking. Gate wav*s got it! M-F 9-5:30 Sat. ^-5. 
GATEWAY ELHCI ROMCS, 4633 Conv«j St., 
San Dic^o CA 921 11; (619)279-4802. 




Hard {a find parts, surplus t;]et;tronics. standard Imt- 
iiems. Hams, hobbyists, industrial professionals — 
from nuts & bolts to laser diodes,.. Blectron teal ly 
speaking. Gateway s got it! M-F 9-5:30 Sat. 9-5. 
GATEWAY ELECTRONrCS, SI 15 N. Federal 
Blvd. 02, Denver CO 80221: (503)458-5444. 




New Castle 
Factory authori/,ed dealer! Yaesu, ICOM, Ten-Tec, 
KDK. Kenwood, AEA. Kantronics. Sanrec. Fall 
line t>f accessories, No sales tas in Delaware, One 
mite off T 95 DELAWARE AMATEUR SUP- 
PLY, 71 Meadow Road, New Castle DE 19720; 
(302)328-7728. 

Wilmington 
Dclaware*s friendliest ham store. Also Shortwave 
sypplies AMATEIR Si ADVANCED COMMU* 
NICATIONS, 3208 Cimcord Pike, Wilmington 
DE 19803; (302)478^2757. 



i'^^^: 

;..»,: 



SST! 



iiti»ii^i 



TLORlDA 



Stuart 
Radio Shack Computers and all other equiptncnt. 
Nationwide. Best prices. Cull FREE on orders over 
$50. COTRONICS INC., Radio Shack Dealer. 
22«0 S.E. Federal Highway, Stuart, FL 34994 
(407) 286-3040, 




Honolulu 

Kenwood, ICOM, Yaesu, Hy-Gain. Cushcraft, 
AEA, KLM, Tri-EX Towers. Fluke. Belden. As- 
tron. Etc. HONOLULU ELECTRONICS. 819 
Keeaumolu Street. Honolulu HI 96814; (808)949- 
5564. 




Preston 

Ross WB7BYZ has the largest stock of amateur gear 
in the IntermouTitaiii West and the best prices. Call 
me for all your ham needs. ROSS DISTRIBCT- 
ING, 78 S. State, Preston ID S3263; (208)852- 
0830, 



Littleton 

Reliable hamstorc servicing New England. Full line 
of Kenwofxl and ICOM stocked and serviced. AEA, 
ARRL Publieations, Anplienol. Alpha Delta, 
Austin, Avanti, Aiinco, Ameco, Bencher, B&W, 
Cushcratt. Carol Cable. Daiwa. Hustler, KLM. 
Kciipro. Larsen, Rohn, RF Concepts, Tokyo Hy- 
ptiwcr, Trac Keyers. Vibroplex, Welz, etc. TEI^ 
COM, INC, 675 Great Road (Rt. 119) Littleton 
MA 01460; (508)486-3400, (3040). 




St^ Louis 
Hard to fmd parts, surplus electronics, standard line 
ilems. Hams, hobbyists, industrial professionals — 
from nuts & bolts to laser diodes,.. Electronically 
speaking, Gateway's got W. M-F 9-5 30 Sat. 9-5. 
GATEW AY ELECTRONICS, 8123 Page Blvd*, 
Sl Louis MO 63 130; (314)427^6116. 




Derry 

Serving the ham comnmniiy with new and used 
equipment. Wc stock and service most major lines: 
AEA, Astron, B&W, Cu she raft, Encomm, Hy- 
Gain. Hustler, ICOM. Kenwood, KLM, Larsen, 
Mirage. Mosiey; books, rotors, cable and connec- 
tors. Business hours Mon,-Sat. 10-5, Thursday 10- 
7, Closed Sun. /Holidays. RIVENDELL ELEC- 
TRONICS, 8 Londotiderry Road, Derry NH 
03038; (603)434^5371. 



NEW JERSEY 



Entontown 

Electronics Supplies for amateurs. Ten-Tec. Barker 
and Williamson, Cu^ihLTafK Hustler, etc. ATKIN- 
SON AND SMITH, 17 I^wis St., Eatontown NJ 
07724(201)542-2447, 

Lynd hurst 
Finally a ham store in NJ. Located '^ mile south of 
Rt. 3. Mon.-Wed. n:30-'7:30, Thursday 11:30-9, 
Friday 11:30^7:30. and Saturday 9-3. Visa/MC. 
ARARIS SYSTEMS, 276 Oriental Place, Lyitd- 
hurst NJ 07071^ (201)939-0015. 

Park Ridge 
Bergen County's oldest and only SWL/ Amateur 
dealer. Specializing in HF receiving systems, amen- 
nas, ham/SWL accessories, books. KenwcK>d. JRC, 
Yaesu. Icom. I mile from Garden State Parkway 
Exit 172, Ty Fri IQ-5; Sal 10-3. GILFER 
SHORTWAVE, 52 Park Avenue, Park Ridge, NJ 
07656; (20 U 391-7887. 




Jamestown 
Western New York's fmest amateur radio dealer 
featuring ICOM-Larsen- A EA-Hamtronics- As- 
tron. New and used gear. VHF COMMUNICA- 
TIONS, 915 North Main St., Jamestown NY 
14701,(716)664-6345. 

New York 
New York City's Largest Pull Service Ham and 
commercial Radio Store. BARRY ELECTRON- 



ICS, 512 Broadway. New York NY 10012; 
(212)925-7000. 

Tappan 
Attention: Manufacmrcrs, Dealers, and Hobbyists; 
Electronic components — iCs, Transistors, Capaci- 
tors, Switches, etc.. . .available at esiremely low 
prices. SANTECH ELECTRONICS, 11 Revere 
Place, Tappan NY 10983 (914)359-1 130, 




Greensboro 

9a. m, to 7p,m. Closed Monday . ICOM our special^ 
ty-Salcs & Service. F&M ELECTRONICS, 3520 
Rockingham Road, Greensboro NC 27467; 
(919)299-3437, 




Columbus 

Central Ohio's full-line authorized dealer for Ken- 
woixl, ICOM, Yaesu, Ten-Tec, Info-Tech, Japan 
Radio, AEA, Cushcraft. Hustler, and Butternut. 
New and used equipment on display and operational 
in our 4000 sq.ft. store. Large SWL department, 
too UNIVERSAL AMATEUR RADIO, 1280 
Aida Drive, Reynoldsburg {Columbus) OH 
43068; (614)^6-4267. 




Trevose 
SameUK-alion for over 38 years. HAMTRONICS, 
DIV, OF TREVOSE ELECTRONICS, 4033 

Brownsville Road, Trevose PA 19047; (215)357- 
1400, 



TENNESSEE 



Memphis 

M-F 9-5; Sat 9-12; Ketiwood. ICOM, Ten-Tec. 
Cushcrafi, Hy-Gain, Hustler, Larsen. AEA. Mi- 
rage, Ameritron, etc, MEMPHIS AMATEUR 
ELECTRONICS, 1465 Wells Station Road. 
Memphis TN 38108; Call Toll Free: (800)238- 
6168. 




Dallas 

In Dallas sjnci? I960- Wc feature Kenwood, ICOM, 
Yaesu, AEA, Butternut. Rohn, amateur publica- 
tions . and a full line of accessories. Factory autho- 
rized Kenwotxi Service Center. ELECTRONIC 
CENTER, INC., 2809 Ross Ave., Dallas TX 
7S201; (214)969-1936. 

Houston 
Hard to find parts, surplus elccironics, standard line 
itenis. Hams, hobbyists, industrial professionals— 
from nuts & boEts to laser diodcs...Electromealty 
speaking. Gateway's got it! M-F 9-5:30 Sat. 
9 5 GATEWAY ELECTRONICS, 10645 
Richmond Ave. #100, Houston TX 77042; 
(713)978-6575. 

S^iuthwesl Houston 
Full line of Equipment and Accessories, in-house 
service, Texas #1 Ten Tec Dealer' MISSION 
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Suite 500, Houston TX 77082; (713)879-7764. 



DEALERS 

Your company name and message can contain up to 23 words for as lillle as $199 yearly (prepaid), ur $50 for three months (prepaid). No tnention 
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April '88 issue must be in our hands by February 1st. Mail to 73 AmntQur Radio, Hope Currier, WGE Center, PeterbortJugh, NH 03458. 

70 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 




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CIRCLE 2SS ON READER SERVICE CARD 



J 



Getting Rich In 
The Ham Market 



Every time two hams get 
together at least one says how 
about if we were to make this 
great product to sell to hams — 
not realizing that the ham 
* 'industry" is probably one 
of the best posKiblc ways to 
guarantee poverty. 




No, not all hams are cheap — not 

ali are living on starvation 

retirement payments— the fact is 

that some ham firms are doing remarkably well selling to those 

few hamii who are alive and well — and to the handful of 

newcomers who blunder into our hobby. 

The whole trick to survival in the ham market is in getting your 
sales message to your potential customers— this is called 
marketing. Marketing includes making sure your literature is 
as good as (or even better than) your product— and that your 
sales pitch reaches those few live hams who are your best 
potential customers. 

rU bet you thought 1 was never going to mention 73 , 
Advertising is going to be one of your biggest sales expenses, 
?o give it the serious thought it rates. Advertissing is a very 
well-developed art— billions have been spent on research to 
ilnd out what works and what doesn't. Indeed Fni working on 
a video just on how to advertise. In the meantime , if you can 
lake it, f'll mercilessly criticize your literature and your ads — 
a service no other ham magazine can provide at any price 
because none of them have anyone with anything even 
remotely like the 35 years Pve had in advertising to hams. 
Unless you I'all into it. it's unlikely you're going to find an ad 
agency able to help you sell to hams — which is, to be kind, a 
unique group. 

Presuming that sales are of some importance to you, where do 
you think you 11 do best? There arc four ham magazines— one 
for advanced builders— one for contest fanatics— one far 
ARRL fans— and then there's 73— which appeals to active 
hams with small construction projects, with the only world DX 
column, with columns and news about all of the new ham 
activities such as packet, RTTY. Oscar and so on. The 73 
readers buy circles around other magazine readers because 
they Ve active and motivated. 

So if you decide to try and fight the odds with a ham product, 
give it your best shot with 73— and let me help you win with 
powerful, sales-oriented literature and ads. A little mail order 
business at home is a great way to become independent— 
millions are doing it. Remember, small business is the real 
strength of America , . .and it's about the only practical way to 
have a crack at making big money these days. 

Write or call the 73 advertising people— Richard. Ed, or Jim— 
and let's get you started with power ads which will make you 
money. 

. . , Wayne 
W2NSD/ i 



73 Amateur Radio 

WGE Center 

Peterborough, NH 03458 

(603) 525-4201 



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72 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



CIRCLE 163 OM READER SERVICE CARD 



Number 26 on your Feedback card 




Mike Stone W&0QCD 
PO Box H 
Lowden lA 52255 

Vertical Vs. Horizontal 
Antennas 

A few years ago. four of us 
s(ynned the ATV (Fast Scan) es- 
tabtishment with the announce* 
m en t of some serious experimen* 
talion and testing work of Alford 
Slot UHF 70 cm antennas. The 
experiments and tests were con* 
ducted by Merle Reynolds 
W9DNT of the BRATS lowayilli- 
nois ATV Club. Gerald Cromer 
K4HNH, and Hap Griffin 
WA4UMU of the Palmerto, South 
Garolrna. ATV Club. Over rhe pasi 
few years, we have all taken a lot 
of comments like "it can't be 
done " *'your testing is very mfs- 
leading," or "there are no hori- 
zontally polarized, omnidirection- 
al antennas with gain, but there 
are a lot of tO dBd vertical ones/' 
The tast one is our favorite west 
coast comment that keeps our 
spirit for iNs challenge alrve. 

The arguments over the years 
about vertical versus horizontal 
antennas were hashed over many 
times. The mention of thts subject 
usually stirs quite a controversy. 
W9DNT, K4NHN, and WA4UMU 
decided to quit tatking about it and 
start doing something about itf 
Nearly three years later, after a lot 
of hard researching, building and 
testmg, ATV horizontal "slots" 
are now popping up all over the 
place on ATV repeaters and re- 
mote transmitter systems (Sum- 
ter, Davenport, Minneapolis, 
Philadelphia, Kansas City, Cen- 
tral Tescas, Oklahoma, Connectr- 
cut, and elsewhere). Even ATV 
simplex and 432 MHz SSBers 
have taken a shine to these un- 
usual antennas. Measured testing 
on calibfaied equipment and 
proper test ranges rate these an- 
tennas (dual-Slacked models), at 
7-10 dB*. These gain figures fa* 
vorably compare to, and in some 
cases actually out-shine, those of 
amateur vertical ground-plane 
''omni" systems. The stots radi- 
ate a toast shape, r^ear-omni pat- 
tern, with side loss rejection mea- 
suring less than t dB down. 
There's a little bit more forward 
gain on the front end or slot open- 
ing of the array than on the back. 
These home-brew antennas run 



Ham Television 

anywhere from $20 to $40, 
depending upon the length and 
rraterrals used. The solid-wall "in- 
finite halo" slots designed by 
W9DNT are the most ruggedly 
built of the slots, and so can 
survive tower icing conditions far 
better than any amateur ground 
plane product. K4NHN"s rib- 
caged slots are taller, lighter, and 
have more gain on single array 
versions. 

Over the past few years, The 
Spec-Corn (USATVS) Journal 
featured quite a few articles on the 
slot design for ATV operation. The 
special fifty-page Alford Slot theo- 
ry and design information is avail* 
able (thanks to K4NHN) m the 
ESF Copy Service's #109 UHF 
Antenna Reprint Booklet for $10 
{40tS Clearview Drive, Cedar 
Falls, Iowa 50613). An extensive 
technical article by Hap Griffin 
WA4UMU describing testing pro- 
cedures for Slots appeared in the 
June 1988 issue of Spec-Com^ 
The antenna designs by W9DNT 
appeared in the May 1968 Spec- 
Corn issue. 

3.5* 70 cm Single or Dual Slot 

The new 200O impedance 3.5'* 
diameter Alford Slot antenna for 
ATV/SSB Is made out of galva- 
nized tin gutter or stovepipe 
metaL The single array is only 5' 
talt with a circumference a little 
over 11." A 1/^" slot opening is 
recommended, A 4-to-1 coaxial 
balun taken from the ARRL Anten- 
na Handbook brings the 200Q 
impedance down to 50Q. Use the 
formula: "492 divided by (f). times 



12^ times coax vetocity formula" 
to determine the connection har- 
ness (439.25 MHz will end up tie- 
ing about 10*— 421.250 MHz at 
1 1 *"). RG-8X is used on this model, 
with Belden 8214 for the longer 
section. Dual-stacking a pair of 
these antennas gives more gain, 
and you can use a common T- 
splitter to join the two antennas. 
Coaxial feedpoint is located in the 
center of the antenna. Brass 
shorting bars are used to e(ectri> 
caHy terminate antenna radiation. 
Support is added as PVC ring col- 
lars. The entire array may be in- 
cased In PVC or plastic/rubber 
corrugated tubing. Seal the slot 
opening to prevent howling or 
whistling. Coat the entire antenna 
with Tenna Cote^'' or similar pro- 
tective finish coating. 

Smarter, Lighter 902-92S 
MHz Design! 

At the request of several FSTV 
individuals who voiced their re- 
quests at the 1988 Dayton ATV 
Workshop sessions. W9DNT 
built, in just a few hours, a com- 
pletely new smaller and light- 
weight "dual" 900 MHz Slot an- 
tenna array. This new antenna 
covers the entire 902-928 MHz 
frequency range. With the use of a 
large umbrella, these two joined 
(200D). "single'* Slots give good 
gain at about half the price. Those 
of you beginning to play with 900 
MHz, or building a 900 MHz ATV 
repeater input or output, should 
take a good look at what Merle has 
achieved! The same U-shaped 
coaxial batun is used as on the 
3.5" 70 cm Slot, only now the 
length is around 5". There is a 
2V4 ' gap between the two anten- 
nas. The slot opening is %* 

These antennas should be 
mounted as the "top most" anten- 




Photo A. Merle Reynoids W9DNT holding an Alford Slot antenna. 



na on Ihe structure or tower. Don't 
use a side-arm bracket mount, as 
that will cause the radiation pat- 
tern to distort toward the tower. 
Keep the antenna at least 2 or 
more feet away from the support- 
ing structure. Contact Merle 
Reynolds by writing to h]m at 710 
25th Avenue Court, Moline, Illi- 
nois. 61265 or by calling him {no 
collect calls accepted), between 
noon and 9 PM at (309) 764-1 685. 
As the popularity of the ATV 
mode continues to grow, more 
ATV repeaters and remote trans* 
mitters (weather radar), will be 
coming on the air. It*s important to 
first recognize the established an* 
tenna plane of operation in your 
own area. If it is vertical, then by 
all means stay upright. If it is pre- 
dominantly horizontal, then, 
thanks to W9DNT. K4NHN. 
WA4UMU and others, there are 
no longer any excuses for not 
building a horizontally polarized 
ATV repeater system! 

QRM Relief? 

While some ATV groups contin- 
ue to fight and hold out at all costs 
against the previously mentioned 
horizontal antenna polarization 
standardization move, others are 
learning of a rewarding, no-cost. 
20 plus dB FM ORM isolation 
method? Take my favorite prot> 
lem target group in the Indiana- 
pofis area. They have a vertical on 
their repeater system on a tall 
State Police Tower, Just south of 
town and have, because of terri- 
ble FM repeater QRM problems, 
retweaked their repeater's side- 
band product to accept the LSB 
audio sub-carrier instead of the 
upper. The Omaha, Nebraska 
area has done the same and. in 
fact, got this procedure entered in 
the regional FC policies. Both crl- 
ies could benefit even further by 
building a W9DNT Slot— this 
would give them an additional 
20 dB of isolation and get them 
on the same DX plane with the 
rest of the world! (TV video du- 
plexers are now available from 
TX/RX and other manufacturers 
of Single-antenna array systems.) 
The fellas on the tndy ATV re* 
peater seem content year after 
year working a limited number of 
people over a limited number of 
miles. 

Wa are now receiving the 
logsheet results of last month's 
USATVS sponsored 7th Annual 
"North American Fast TV UHF 
QSO and DX Contest!" Stay 
tuned for the results* We had a 
great activity turnout and some 
"long hauls! 



73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 73 



Number £7 on your Feedback card 



Pn uTTiDe r if / on y ou 
ROPA GA TION 



Jim Gray WIXU 
P.O. Box 1079 
Psyson, AZ 35541 

Propagation Forecast 

HF propagation conditions dur- 
ing the month of October should 
be better than average due to sea- 
sonal upswings in soiar activity 
without the excessively higli ab- 
sorption levels of the summer 
months. The sunspot numbers 
continue with the rising of Cycle 
22, and the still almost-equal num- 
bers of daylight and darkness 
hours cortthbute to excellent HF 
propagation. You may find that 
geomagnetic field disturbances 
will ruin some otherwise good 
days , so a constant check of WWV 
at 18 minutes after the hour will 
keep you apprised of changes in 
solarfluxvalues and geomagnetic 
field conditions. Once again, look 
for solar fiux values of 150 or 
higher. The higher the soiar fiux 
and the iower the A index, the bet- 
ter propagation will be. 

You wiil want to lool^ at two 
specific areas of the accompany- 
ing charts: the daily letters 
G = Good, F = Fair. and P-Poor; 
and the trends, such as F-P, for 
exampfe, which means Fair condi- 
tions trending to Poof. The sec- 
ond area to be aware of is the 
MUF, or maximum usabie fre- 
quency. Our charts show which 
bands are expected to be usable 
from one part of the world to an- 
other, and what time to expect 
these openings. On a day where 
"P" conditions prevail, it is unlike- 
ly that you wiii be able to contact 
Timbuktu at a band and time when 
there are no expected openrngs to 
Africa. On the other hand, when a 
"G" symbol is given for a partrcu- 



by Jim Gray WIXU 

far day^ and when openings are 
anticipated at a certain time to a 
particular area of the world, it 
would be very beneficial to keep 
the receiver sharp-tuned for OX 
signals from the indicated areas, 

if you have a beam antenna of 
some kind, it may help to pick up 
the weaker signals from early 
band openings. Even on "Good" 
days, you can't always expect to 
hear exotic calls roaring through 
the loudspeaker or earphones. 
Patience, and an ability to dig out 
the weak signals, will prove to be 
assets, That DX station may be 
one that has a poor antenna and a 
very low-power transmitter! 

Be aware of excellent possibili- 
ties just before dark and just after 
dawn— the so-called ''gray-lme 
DX*' opportunity. Signals seem to 
propagate particularly well along 
the earth's iine of darkness as it 
approaches any given area. Per- 
haps not so obvious is the fact 
that as darkness advances in one 
area of the world, it retreats in ap" 
other, and these two areas may 
be accessible to one another by 
propagation of Hf sjgnais. Quite 
often^ signals propagated along 
the "gray-line'' have unusual 
strengths at the receiving end. Al- 
so, these signals may arrive from 
unexpected directions, compared 
to signals received during either 
the daylight or darkness hours. 

We have discussed DX and 
'Mong-skip,'' multi-hop propaga- 
tion in these pages almost to the 
exclusion of the "other" type of 
propagation called "short skip/' It 
might be worthwhile to talk just a 
little about short skip opportuni- 
ties; that is, the propagation of sig- 
nals over distances of approxi- 
mately too to 2500 miles. 



SUW 


OCTOBER 1988 

MON TUF WED THL FRf SAT 


1 


1 

G 


2 

G 


3 

G 


4 

G 


5 

G-F 


6 

F-P 


7 

p 


8 

p 


9 

p 


10 

p 


11 

P 


12 

P-F 


13 

F 


14 

F 


15 

F-G 


16 

G 


17 

G 


18 

G 


19 

G 


20 

G-F 


21 

F 


22 

F 


23 F-P 
30 G 


24 P 

31 G 


25 

p 


26 

P-F 


27 

F-G 


28 

G 


29 

G 



This type of propagation occurs 
mostly in single-hop. rather than 
multi-hop, stages and may be pre- 
dominantly Fi-layer propagation, 
at least on frequencies above 14 
MHz, Short skip usually begins 
with shorter distances in the 
morning hours Increasing to 
longer distances in the darkness 
hours before midnight local time. 
Short skip propagation can be 
useful if you know where and 
when to look, and also for the pur- 
pose of 'keeping a sked'* with a 
friend in another part of the coun- 
try. Looking at it in another light, 
you can think of DX as "long skip*' 
and everything else as short- or 
medium-skip propagation. It Is 
probably best to discuss short 
skip in terms of a band-by-band 



summary, beginning with 160 me- 
ters and ending with 10 meters. 
Duhng the days when conditions 
are generally listed as "Good" or 
"Fair" in our calendar, skip dis- 
tances wiii change with time and 
frequency. On "Fair" or 'Poor" 
days, you may not be able to work 
any short skip at alL 

To use short skip, consider the 
midpoint of the path between any 
two locations. The local time at 
the midpoint determines the time 
at your end of the path and at 
the other end of the path, when 
the short skip path crosses sever- 
al time zones, 



See next month's column for 
examples on how to u^e the 
charts to determinB short skip. 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO 



GMT: 


00 


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06 


oa 


H3 


12 


\4 


16 


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TO 


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- 1 13 1 




AHQENTINA 


:m) 


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AC 


40 


» 


- 




— 


- 


K ; 15 




AUSTRALIA 


lb 




20 






40 


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PANAMA 


lb 


:'0 .. 


•Ai^^ 


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WESTERN EUROPE 


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74 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



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76 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



Number 28 Ofi your FeedbscK card 



Inexpensive Display for 
Weather Satellite Pictures 

Set up your microcomputer to receive WEFAX pictures. 



hy Vince Coppola NI VC 



After a few years af receiving quality 
piciures on old surplus weaiher 
recorders. I got tired of their many problems, 
inclutiing balkiness. foul txJors. and expen- 
sive paper. My thoughts led to digitizing the 
piciure with a microcomputer. 

This project, which I tcwk on about 5 years 
ago, was developed on an S- IQO bus system. 
My board would display an image of 256 
pixels horizontal, by 128 pixels vertical, by 
16 gray levels. Ft did not take long to fill up a 
board with RAM chips and other components 
to achic\ c this size image, nor did it take long 
to exceed m_v budget. With the technology of 
even just a few years ago, 1 was unable to 
duplicate the nice quality pictures 1 was get- 
ting from my old boat ancht>r recorders. 

Recendy , 1 saw ihe specs on the Imagcwise 
board developed by Circuit Cellar I, with 
256 horizontaL by 244 venicah by 6 bits. 
This could double the venical area of my 



picture and increase my gray scale to 64 lev* 
els. This should improve my picture quality, 
getting rid of jaggcdness on certain details 
caused by digitization. Another nice feature 
is that it is driven by a serial port. I could 
conneci the display board to any computer [ 
wished, as long as it had an RS-232 pon. 

One candidate was my CoCo II which al- 
ready had a buik-in A/D converter. I choose 
my IBM AT clone, however, because it has 
much more memory, and the Imtjgcwise 
drivers and image processing routines ucre 
already available from Circuit Cellar. The 
only thing I needed was a 6-bii A/D board 
w ith a parallel pon that would allow me to 
sample at about 1 tX) microseconds. I came up 
with the design in Figure I . I settled for an 8 
bit A/D just in case I needed it for a future 
project that would yield 256 gray levels. The 
100 microseconds is probably overkill, but 
this will work out vcr)' nicely for my next 



project with the Imagewtse boanl slow scan 
television. 

The article doesn*t deal with the details of 
building the entire station— check out Refer- 
ences 2 and 3 tor that, t Reference 3 also 
contains some very useful information for 
satellite identification.) What I show here is 
how to send the demodulated video signal and 
the sync pulses to an A/D interface board in 
the IBM PC, sample and store them, and send 
the data out an RS-232 port to Imagewise. Of 
course, since the image is stored in a disk file, 
image processing can remove noise, and it's 
possible also to run an image enhancement 
program on it* to bring out ground, cloud 
details, etc. A higher level language, such as 
''C*' or BASIC, handles the gory math. 

Refer to Figure 2. The 137 MHz AM signal 
is received from the satellite, fed into the 
video demodulator, in this case, also into the 
RTM CCF-2 board 4. The video output sig- 



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figure L Schcmattcfor the 6-bit A/D convener with n pamltt'l port 



73 Amateur Radio • October. 19S8 77 



nal is then converted to a O-to-5 voU signal. 
Zero volts represents black » 5 voliii repre- 
sefits while, ami everything in between is a 
gray level. This is fed into the AD converter 
where il is sampled and stored to RAM at 
fixed imcrvais by the PC. This is simple so 
far, bui sync information is still need^. 

Horizontal Svnc Pulse 

With a 120 line-per-minuie (LPM; irans- 
mission rate, the unit receives a line every 
0.5 seconds. If we generate an accurate 0.5 
Siecond-spaced pulse of about 5 millisec- 
ond duration (a standard du rat ton), wc can 
use this as the horizontal sync pulse for 
telling us when to start displaying a new line. 
On the RTM board, this .5 sec pulse is 
derived from the on- board crystal oscillator 
and also has a circuit buiJl in for nmnual 
phasing of the image. What this means is, 
if the picture is out of phase with the locally 
generated sync pulse, then we can press this 
switch down until the view is the way we 
want it. 

Another nice feature of the RTM board is 
that it allows video storage on a stereo tape 
recorder* 

Now that the horizontal sync pulse has been 
generated, it is fed into the 8255 port on the 
A/D board. This tells the program when lo 
store a sync pulse byte (4 1 H ^ into the stored 
image flle^ so the Lmagewise receiver board 
will know when lo start a new line . At the 
beginning of the image in memory, we store a 
start of Frame byte (40H). This tells Image- 
wise that a new picture is coming. When we 
have filled up the 62K with imager>\ we place 
an End o( Frame byte at the end (42H). The 
software automatically saves the 62k image 
to disk when the image has finished scanning, 
and invokes SH0W.COM to display the im- 
age to Imiigcwise, 

An important point is thai the image- 
wise file Ibrniai is not much different from 
the FIX file format used on the ROBOT 1200. 
The only differences are the Start of Frame 
byte, the End i>f Frame byte, and the now line 
bytes that arc added to Image wise. John 
Williams of the Datalink BBS wrote pro- 
grams that will convert files both ways. It's 
available for downloading from that source. 

Circuit Description 

The circuit was designed for the IBM PC 
bus. The 8255 parallel I/O is the heart of the 
boards and is capable of reading or writing to 
three 8bit pi^rts: 300. 30 K and 302, The 
board is set up lo be used in ihc prototype area 
of the PC and uses ports 300H-303H. Pon 
303H is where the configuration byte or con- 
trol byte is stored for the 8255. Ports A* B, 
and C correspond to locations 300H-302H, 
respectively. Port A is configured as an out- 
put port, port B as an input port, and Port C is 
split up into both input and output pons. The 
Port C output lines control the sampling, imd 
the A/D conversion of the video input line. 
When the conversion is done . the S-bit byte is 
read into Port B on the 8255, The input lines 
of port C read the sync input lines (only 
hori/tmial sync in the case of FAX ) . Port A is 
used to select which inpyt line of the A/D 

78 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



RECEIVING ANTENNA 




137 HH2 RCVR 



RTM CIRCUIT BOARD PC iNTERrACE BOARD 



I'iT^jT 


ALmtd 
Eumn 








1 Host vrro 1^ Ris 





IMAGE WISE DISPLAY BDARB 



PC SERIAL 

PORT DUTPUT 






H^UT 



OUTftlT 



MMrnx 



Figure 2. Fiowvhon for the WEFAX ima^e retTptitm, digitimnon. and dispiay. 



converter we are going to sample {line in 
our case). 

The clock for is supplied by an on-board 
oscillator, I could have stolen it from the PC 
bus, but doing it this way, the software be- 
comes compaiible with computers of varying 
clock rates, such as turbtJs and ATs* 

Constmcfion 

The prototype was built on a short slot type 
wire- wrap proto board avaiilable from 
Jameco. The board comes without a mount- 
ing bracket, I felt that it was desirable to have 
one. so I mounted some homemade brackets 
on it. and punched a hole for the connector to 
the RTM board. I used a D-type connector for 
simplicity. Simplicity and easily obtainable 
parts were two objectives of this design. 
Placement of the parts is really not critical, 
but bypass capacitors of the . 1 ^f disc ceram- 
ic type should be placed from the 5 volt bus to 
ground, as close as possible to each IC on the 
board. I would also advise ohming out the 
entire circuit before plugging ic in. The half 
hour or so you may spend in doing so may 
save you hours oftroubleshooting. l also sug* 
gesi placing the board into the PC and mea- 
suring certain points tor the correct voltages 
before installing the ICs. This will also likely 
save you much inniblc. 

Checkout 

Before trying to receive FAX, check tnit 
the video input port. Place a known DC 
voltage in the range of 0-5 volts on the video 
line. Next, insert the program disk into Disk 
A, and type MENUO. When the menu comes 
up. type a *'V" to observe the voltages that 
print out continuously on the screen. They 
should indicate the correct value continuous- 
ly, with maybe a slight (and negligible) error 
in the hundredths digit. If all is OK, then hit 
CNTL-Brkioexit. 

You are now rcudy to hook up the RTM 
board. It is a good idea to shield these input 
cables and ground the shield to the PC chas- 
sis. Again inscn the program disk into Drive 
A, and a formatted blank disk into Drive B. 
Type MENUO. and select the type of satellite 
you want to display. Vou should select one of 
die phasing keys at first. Then start the tape. 
If all is good, then you will see each line being 
scanned from the lop to the bonom of your 



monitor, and in four colors if you have a color 
monitor. If no lines appear, then you are not 
receiving horizontal sync pulses, and you 
should check your wiring. If the picture has to 
be phased, you can do so now by holding 
down the phasing switch on the RTM inter- 
face. When all looks good, hit return and you 
will return to the menu. Now hit the correct 
key to receive and store the image. When the 
image is stored, the program will automati- 
cal Iv store it to a Ole on Drive B called IM- 
AGE. PIC. It will then anempt to send if to 
Imagewise using the SHOW.COM utility 
supplied by Circuit Cellar. The program will 
then return to the menu. 

Additional Notes 

In this article, I attempted to explain a rela- 
tively low-cost board that can display excel- 
lent results when connected to the above sys- 
tern. Two closing points: the files obtnincd 
with my software can be convened lo FIX 
files formal as used in the ROBOT 1200. 
Also available on the Datalink UBS is a 
program I have downloaded that wilt display 
.PIX files in EGA format. These twt* pro- 
grams are: 

EGA -PIX- Monochrome 
EGA-PIX2-Color 

The programs work only with 19 gray 
levels* but the results were pleasing, anyway. 
when I ran them on some polar orbiting im- 
ages as well as some WEFAX frames. 

References 

1. Circuit Cellar— Imagewise display/re- 
cetver board partial kit« full kit, or fully 
assembled and tested. CCI, PO Box 428, 

Tolland CT 06084. (203) 875-275 ] . 

2* New Sat el life Haudhoi>k — by Ralph Tag- 

gart, 602 S, Jefferson, Ma.^n MI 48854. 

3 73 Magazine December 1*?84— Color 
SSTV PART IJ, by Taggart and Abrams. 

4 RTM Circuit Boards. 205 ESm St., Van 
Hornc lA 52346-0400. CCF-2 FAX Inter- 
face board. 

5 Datalink RBBS— Jeff Wullach N5ITU, 
chairman. (214) 394-7325. 



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73 Amat&ur R^dio • October, 1 988 79 



I^umb«r29 on your Feedback card 



73 Advertiser's Product Index 

A convenient service for our Readers. 



RS^ 



Company 



Page RS^ 



Company 



Pagv 



AMFUREflS 



67 
99 



^7 
354 



1S1 

61 

142 

1G5 



Dernron 

Electt'Dnic Equipnvenl Bank 

Eiecirontc Eqyipmem Sank 

Eledfonic Equipment Sank 

Electron kc Equipmerft Bank 

Ehicironic E<|ujpmer^t Bank 

Electronic Eqmpmefit Barik 

GTI Efectronics 

Hftath Co 

ICOM 

Kftnwood 

Kenwood 

Kenwood 

PBUtdon Associates . 

RF Enterprises 

Yaesu 



12 

et 

57 
66 

ta 

82 

4^ 

49 

51 

57 

59 

&5 

Cover 2 

Cover A 

7 

e 

76 

59 

86 

Cover 3 



ANTENNAS, TOWERS. CABLE AND 
ACCiBSOmBS 



65 


AEA 


5 


AntenrvBS West 


m 


Antennas VJe^t 


90 


Aii(0Tina£ We^r 


?3n 


Antennas West 


H(K* 


Antmirtas Wesi 


MKi 


Artii&nna$ West 


W4 


ArTlvnifii«s We^t 


53 


B^nk&t ami WiUiamson 


4? 


Bttal 


« 


Butternut Electronics 


263 


Oentfon 


;wi 


DMQ 


IS 


Doppler System 


« 


ElectTOfuc Equipment Ban* 


« 


Electronic Equipment Bank 


• 


Elecironc Equipment Bank 


'* 


EJecitonic Equ^pme^t Bank 


■ 


Electronic Equipmeni Bank 


■ 


Eiactrooic Equipment Sank 


291 


EJectron Processing 


• 


Garant Enierpri&es 


72 


Glen Mdrtirt 


9 


Heath Co 


289 


Hustler Antennas 


354 


ICOM .,... 


• 


Jo Gunn Enterprises 


i 


Kenwood 


■ 


Kenvi/ood 


■ 


Kenwood 


24 


MFJ ... 


101 


MaJtcom 


163 


MobHoMark 


• 


Memat Electronics 


29 


PX Sh^ck 


30 


QEP's 


1WT 


Radio Works 


115 


RF Connection 


142 


RF Emerpnses 


274 


Snfeiitev Antennas 


tm 


S|>ectrum intemstional . 


m 


W9INN Ameftnas 


319 


WnCoinm Electronics 


a*!,^ 


WtHiaitiM i^^^Companv 


165 


Vaesu 



92 
60 
49 
&1 
^ 
66 

39 
79 
30 

91 
66 
79 

ts 

82 
45 
49 
51 
57 
62 
57 
49 
95 
93 

Cover 2 
57 

Cover 4 
7 

a 

3 
69 
72 
3© 
57 
51 
59 
&9 
86 
76 
66 
39 
S9 
. S2 
Covsf3 



SOOPfS. MAGAltNES. OSL CARDS, 
TAPES. COURSES 



S2 

art 

156 

7 

157 

12B 

339 

■ 

&7 
241 



ARRL 

AmenneMt 

Antique R actio Classified 

Buci^ mailer Publishing 

Biickmasler Publishing 

Clevel-and Inslitute 

EieClronk:s Book C'ltib 

GGTE 

Heath Co 

Lindsay Publications 
Media Mentors ....... 

NSKW QSL Cards _,„. 



91 
59 
2a 

49 
S0 
65 
53 
58 
85 
65 
23 
66 



73 Mto&zine 



CBlolO 
Code Tapes 
Dealers 
DK Map 
OrlUng Rbch 
73 OSL Cajds 
73 Sybscnption 



60 
65 
79 
2Q 
72 
66 
17 



REPEATERS, CONTROLLEftS, ETC 



1 Advanced Computer Controls 93 

• CESTTn H IB 

12 Conr\,ect Systems . 1 

10 DommumtatKjris Specialists 95 

3QG Creative Control PrtKlucts 45 

354 JCOM Cover2 

47 llaggiore EfcN^lronic^ .56 

348 Microcomputer Concepts/H&LEIeclfonics 39 

295 Micro Contfol Spec tatties 71 

142 RF Enterprises S6 

9S S-Comm .2a 

51 Spectrum Communicaikins 18 



TRANSCEi\/ERS, flECEtVERS 



65 


AEA 


245 


AXM^^c . , 


* 


HeattiCo. . . 


354 


ICOM 




Kenwood 




Kenwood 




Kenwood 




PC Electfontcs 




PC Electronics 


142 


RFErrlBTp rises 


14 


Sangean Amer^a 


IRfi 


Yaesu 



... 92 
..93 

B5 

Cover 2 

Cover 4 

7 

S 

12 

62 

86 

2 

Cover 3 



mrs 



194 All Electrtmics 

• C8C Irrtef nalionjJ 

• Gsehl Electn>rHCS 
■ Hamtronics, NY 

• Heam Co 

34 Ramsey EJeclftmics 



62 
^9 
66 
25 

85 
47 



POWER SUPPLIES, BATTERtES 



5 

89 

90 

236 

302 

303 

304 

16 



354 



142 
165 
t12 



AfUirainas West 
Antennas West 
Antennas Wesl 
Antennas Wesi 
Antennas West 
Antennas West 
Antennas West 
Aslron Corp. 
Control products UnUmited 

Healh Co 

ICOM 

Kenwood 

Kenwood . 
Kenwood . 

Periphest 

RF Enterprises 

Vsesu 

E K Yost 



SO 
49 
51 

28 
68 
58 
39 
42 
15 

B5 

Cover 2 

Cover 4 

7 

8 

28 

86 

Cover 3 

81 



COMPONENTS 



194 AJiElectfQ^ics 
53 Barker and^ Wi Ihamson 
345 Computer Radw 

Electronic Equipmernt Ba/ik 
Elect nonic Equfpmeni Bank 
Electronic Equipmefit Ba^k 
EJectro^c Equipmgfit Bonk 
ElectnDfiic Equipment Bank 
ElectnDoic Equipment Bank 
HeattiCo 
320 MAOElectltNiics 
252 Mic^ndTectinologies 
68 Petifih^K , - . , 
©6 P^po Communication* 
• RFPans 



79 
49 

15 
82 
4S 
49 
51 
S7 
85 
49 
58 
28 
B1 
23 



TOOLS, TESTEOytPMENT 



342 Digimax 

• Electronic Eq u i p rn e rvi Ba.nk 
■ EiectfonicEquipmen.! Bank 

• Electronic Equip me ni Bank 

• Electfonie Equip men! Bank 

• Electronic Equip menl Bank 

• EiectronicEquiprrieniBank 

• Global Specia Hies 

• Heath Co, . . 

• Kenwood 

• Kenwood 

• Kenwood 
24 MFJ . , 
34 Ramsey 

165 Yaesu 



82 
15 
82 
.45 
49 
SI 
57 
32 
85 

Cover 4 

. 7 

8 

3 

47 

Cover 3 



KEYS, KEYERS 



24 
142 



Company 



MFJ 

RF Enterprises 



Page 

3 
B6 



mSC ACCESSORIES 


65 AEA . 


92 


326 Applied Digital Research 


39 


1 5® Arim uth Communcations 


32 


344 Call SkQn Cups 


39 


1 1 Call Sign Cups 


51 


13 Call Sign Cups 


2B 


345 Computer Radio 


49 


352 Dal ak Corp 


19 


■ Electronic Equipment Bank . 


15 


• Electronic Equipment Bank 


B2 


• Electronic Equipment Bank . 


45 


• Elect rcmc £ q u i p m en l Ba n k 


49 


• Electronic Eq u i p m en 1 Ba nk 


51 


» Electronic Equipment Bank . 


a? 


291 Electron Processing 


62 


326 Eleclron Processing 


45 


326 GTI Electron tcs 


45 


346 Great Circfe Maps 


16 


• HeatbCo. 


85 


354 ICOM 


Cover 2 


• Kenwood 


Cover 4 


• Kenwood 


7 


• Kenwood 


e 


271 UWelde/CAE 


32 


336 Magnaptiase 


45 


* Maryia#id Monogram 


60 


55 Meadowlaite Corp. 


60 


127 Motion Etecironics 


59 


17B Pacific Calite 


51 


87 Printer Productivity 


81 


142 RF Enterprises 


86 


193 Roboi Research 


19 


347 Stone Mpuntian Ertgirvgenng 


81 


64 Wifitsf Designs 


51 


RETMflMRS 


• Amateur Eleclfonjc Supply 


48 


• Associated Fiadio 


75 


4t Barfy Electronics 


43 


350 C&SSales 


75 


• C0M8 Distributors 


31 


1 2 1 Com m unicat ions E 1 ectroftics 


34 


* Delaware Amateur Supply 


26 


* Down East Microwave 


45 


133 EGE 


9B 


309 Hamlronics, PA 


56 


272 Jun's Electronics 


91 


2S Madison Electrcinics 


23 


162 Michigan Radio . . 


17 


187 M i ss lon Consg Hi ng 


58 


323 ryJational Tower 


3T 


142 RFEnierpnses 


65 


254 Ross Distributing 


49 


• The Ham Station 


71 


• Universal Amaietir Had to 


76 


296 VHP Ccmmuntcations 


sr 


COMPUTER HARD WARE AND 




SOFTWARE 




sa Aerospace CoRSultMig 


93 


338 Ashlon ITC 


32 


357 AT Fab 


59 


343 Comm Pute lr*c 


58 


80 Compomax 


76 


103 Donimnics 


66 


• EngtDeering Consultmg 


60 


339 GGTE 


58 


ITS Hal Tfonm 


56 


• Heath Co 


85 


350 Iniercon Data Systefns 


94 


322 KasaiB Micrcsystems 


51 


356 Rad-Com 


59 


3S1 Zelf wan ger Electronics. 


65 


PACKET EQUIPMENT 




65 AEA 


92 


239 DRSI 


26 


291 Elecuon Processing 


62 


17 GLB EJoeironics 


79 


• Heath Co 


85 


24 MFJ 


3 


162 Pac Comm 


76 


362 Radioiel , 


51 


142 RF Enlerpnses 


ea 


35 1 Zeltwanger Etectronics 


65 


HAMFBSTS 



335 Ace Systems 
* HeainCo 



■ »- 1!- -d 



48 
85 



&ur>coast Conventron 
Tropical Hamticfee 



62 
61 



80 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 



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Feedba CK 



In our continuing effort to present ihe best in 
amateur radio features and columns, we've decid- 
ed to go directly to the source — you, the reader. 
Articles and columns are assigned feedback num- 
bers, which appear on each article/column and are 
also listed below. These numbers correspond to 
those on the feedback card opposite this page. On 
the card, please check the box which honestly rep- 
resents your opinion of each article or column. 

Do we really read the feedback cards? You bet! 
The results are tabulated each month, and the edi- 
tors take a good, hard look at what you do and don*t 
like. To show our appreciation, well draw one feed- 
back card each month and award the lucky winner a 
free one-year subscription (or extension) to 73. 

To save some money on stamps, why not fill out 
the Product Report card and the Feedback card and 
put them in an envelope. Toss in a damning or 
praising letter to the editor while you're at it. You 
can also enter your QSL in our QSL of the Month 
contest. All for the fow, low price of 25 cents! 



Feedback^ Title 

1 Welcome. Newcomers 

2 Never Say Die 

3 QRX 

4 Packet Full of Pixels 

5 Review: 

Alinco24T 144/440 MHz 
FM Transceiver 

6 A Trip Through The 
Microwave Spectrum 

7 lOGHzPolaplexer 

8 VHF/UHF Tape Antenna 

9 Review: 

SSB Electronics LT-33S 

10 Portable Re-entrant 
Cavity Two Meter Anienna 

11 Review: W2DRZ 902 MHz 
Linear Transverter 

12 Pee Wee Thirty 
Transceiver (Part Two) 

13 Passions Of The Ether 

14 Antenna Systems 
(Part Two) 



Feedback* Title 

15 Microwave Test 
Equipment 

16 Review: Down East 
Microwave Model 2345LY 

17 Above and Beyond 

18 RTTYLoop 

19 New Products 

20 Review: MotronAK-10 

21 Special Events 

22 Index: 10/88 

23 Hamsats 

24 Barter N Buy 

25 Dealer Directory 

26 ATV 

27 Propagation 

28 Inexpensive Display for 
Weather Satellites 

29 Ad Index 

30 QRP 

31 73 International 

32 Errata 

33 Leners 



73 Amateur Radio • OctobeM988 81 




Something new in a high power, high quality, HF linear amplifier 

The Advanced Radio Devices (ARD) 230 series represents a new generation in high power 
linear amplifiers. Utilizing microprocessor control, the 230 provides full "HANDS OFF** 

automatic operation* 



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» Modular construction 
u Export /commercial versions available 

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UPS shippabk (3 boxes) 











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Frequency: all amateiir (1.8 - 21 MHz) 
Drive: 50 - SO watts for full output 
Output: ISOO watts PEP 
Input Impedence: 50 ohms unbalanced 
Input VSWR: 1.5:1 (higher on WARC) 
Output Impedence: 50 ohms unbalanced 
Harmonic Supp: greater than -45 dB 
Intermod prods: more than -35 dB down 
Duty: CCS (cont. commercial svc) 
Tubes: EIMAC 3CX800A7 {two) 
ALC: to -6 VDC 
Output Configuration: Pi-L 
AC Power: 230 VAC at 20A 
Sise (WHD in inches) Al Weight 

Microcontroller: 10x6x9 at 5 lbs 
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Local & tech info 
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82 73 Amateur Radio • October. 1 




Number 30 on your Feedback card 



Mme Bryce WBBVGE 
2225 Mayflower NW 
Massfiion, OH 44646 

I start here with a second look at 
the vertical antenna. In the past, 
Tve menriooed the ho-hum 
performance of the vertical anten- 
nas I have used. Larry Jones 
WB5KYK sent me a great letter on 
the vertical antenna. Apparently, 
he didn't like my statement that 
vertical antennas radiated poorly 
in all directions, Larry has over 29 
years of experience in vertical an- 
tennas. Follow Larry's field opera- 
tor's guide to verticals for a good 
antenna that radiates a good sig- 
nal in all directions. Larry writes 
the following: 

"So. you want to put up an an* 
tenna thai doesn't require a tower. 
Enter the vertical, the stepchild of 
the antenna family. Or is it? Let's 
ffnd out what really works at one's 
QTH and not what works just in 
tlieory, 

*"FJrst understand that the very 
f>ature of thts beast makes it notsy 
on receive* so if there is a noise 
problem, be ready to use a differ* 
em antenna for reception. This is 
not much of a problem with verti- 
cals on bands above 40 meters. 
Do not even think about putting up 
a vertical if it is easier to put up 
than a beam. Understand Ihat the 
antennas that we are talking 
about are those that wilT work. It is 
easy to drive a piece of pipe in the 
ground, bolt on a commercially 
made vertical, and call CQ. That is 
the kind of vertical that Mike was 
talking about What he didn't say 
was that the only QTH where 
these antennas work worth a 
damn are ships at sea and is- 
lands. If that is the kind of antenna 
project in mind, quit reading right 
here, sell the OTH. and get a copy 
of 75 sent to the new QTH. 

"Avoid any vertical that has 
traps in it, especially on OR P. 
These things make the vertical ra- 
diate poorly on more than one 
band, while they eat up one watt, 
Nothing like having a poor signal 
on more than one band from the 
same antennaf Also, avoid using 
loading coils at the base of the 
antenna. If a coil has to be used, 
make it with btg copper (#6) wire. 
Solder the feedline to the tap 
poirit. Don't use some device that 
is easy to bolt on to the coif, sup- 



Low Power Operation 

pHed by a friend down the block. 
Chances are he got it from the 
vertical he took down that didn't 
work. 

* "Where does the vertical go? In 
the clear. It is that simple. If this 
can't be done by ground-mount- 
ing the verlicalt try going up. Once 
I used a short vertical mounted to 
the side of a chimney on 160 me- 
ters, and it worked great. With this 
method, be sure that a big copper 
wire is run to the base of the verti- 
cal for grounding. Attach it to a 
good ground rod. 1 consider a 
ground rod of no less that 12 feet 
to be about the minimum length 
for above-ground installations. Be 
sure to run as many radial s down 
to the ground as possible. They 
don't need to be the same length, I 
consider f 6 to be a minimum num- 
ber. 

"These are not tuned radials, 
50 the formula to determine their 
length is this: make them reach 
the ground as far away From the 
antenna as possible. The wire to 
make the radials really doesn't 
matter. Here comes the bad part. 
In all likelihood » a tuner will have 
to be used. I suggest any QRP 
operator get (or build) a good low 
power tuner. And what about the 
power loss in a tuner? How many 
hams are using RG8/U or smaller 
coax in a QRP operation? Why not 
use a hardline or 991 3? I can't see 
how anyone could be too con- 
cerned about the loss in a properly 
designed tuner if they aren't con- 
cerned with that hamfest special 
coax. Granted, a little power will 
be lost in the tuner, but try con- 
necting a power meter to the feed- 
line at the antenna. Qonl place it 
immediately after the tuner, but at 
the feedpoint. See how much 



power is actually getting to the an- 
tenna without a tuner. It is an illy- 
minatmg observation. 

**\1 the antenna system is to be 
permanent, rt is always good to 
have insulated radial wire. Be 
sure to connect these above* 
ground radials to the antenna 
grounding point in an electrfcally 
sound manner. This usually 
means soldering. What is me- 
chanically sound is not always 
electrically sound. 




Figura T. The 50 m&ter VEE 
beam. 

"If somethmg needs to t>e bolt- 
ed to the antenna base for attach- 
rng radials. tin the soldering lugs 
with solder. The vertical antenna 
builder and user must fight any 
loss of continuity in his radial sys- 
tem. A cheap way to attach the 
radials at the end to ground, in 
above the ground installations, is 
to use aluminum tent pegs. They 
are durable as well as cheap. It 
doesn't matter if the vertical is 
ground-mounted or above-ground 
mounted. Tie the radial system in- 
to everything that will give a 
ground, such as chain link fences, 
arbor wire benches, water pipes, 
and steel or copper lines. 

**The rule for ground- and 
atiove-ground mounted verticals 
is to evenly space the radials as 
much as possible in a 360 degree 
circle. Also, ground-mounted ver- 
ticals should have as many radials 
as possible. They should t^e as 




0073 Spy Key 



by Skip Westrich WB80WM 



Here is a very inexpensive homebrew "0073 Spy Key/' Mr 
Bond. Use two dominoes, a Radio Shack 275-016 micro-switch, a 
dash {pardon the pun) of epoxy, and you are in business, so to 
speak. The key works great upright or on its side and tucks away 
nicely for covert operations. 

One last ttem. Mr. Bond. The key never needs adjustment. 
With those S-amp, 250 VAC contacts, this key should "Never Say 
Die." 

So there you have \L Good luck with your mission, Mr. Bond. 



long as they can be, up to two or 
three feel longer than V4 the wave- 
length on the lowest frequency 
used. Tie the radials into every- 
thing, I highly recommend using a 
large number of short radials right 
around the base of the antenna. 
How short is short? Vis of a wave- 
length will wofk^ but ^ is better If 
possible, put poultry wire on top of 
the ground around the base of the 
antenna. The radials will work fine 
on top of the ground. If they are 
buried, don't bury them too deep, 
especially if operating on 10, 15, 
and 20 meters. 

'*The best and simplest vertrcal 
Is V4 wavelength long and oper- 
ates on a single band. A V4 wave- 
length vertical cut for 7.1 MHz 
would only be 32.96 feet tall. A 
telescoping TV mast pole would 
work fine for this. Get a cool drink 
in a glass bottle to celebrate pur* 
chasing the TV mast pole and 
have the base insulator for the 
vertical. I said that a V4 wave verti- 
cal is the best. Let me state it this 
way. It is the best when consider- 
ing cos^, ease of installation, and 
feedline matching. It will work 
great, but there are other verticais 
that will out perform it. 



-» iitA~ 



1 



JOFFltt 



n FfTT 
VXffm 
T««|l,EJIfi 



I IF 
TO tuMtn 



Figure Z The 40 meter hng wire 
anterina. 

"The vertical, when operating 
against the proper radial system, 
is a tow-angle radiator. The trade 
off for good performance at great 
distances is poorer performance 
at shorter distances. These anten- 
nas do work, and they work well 
for what they were designed to 
do— transmit well at great dis- 
tances. 

"At our QTH we have an invert- 
ed L (one of the many forms of the 
vertical) that is ^ wavelength long 
on 1.84 MHz. \ have 120 ground 
radials down, 125 feet long, 
grounded to what I call my central 
ground hub: five ground rods, 12 
feet long, arranged in a square. 
I have 150 ground radials that 
are 18 feet long and poultry wire 
at the base of the antenna. Tm 
also tied into various ground 
sources around the QTH. My 
vertical radiates equally good in 
all directions. 

'i always enjoy hearing from 
people who use verticals, and 



73 Amateur Radio • October. 1988 83 



1 Kt UtTSMATE TRANSNlftTCK - 





Photo A. Alan Pike's quick change antenna setup. Top row for radios, 
bottom row for antennas. 



Photo 8. Not much to it. Just some female connectors and a piece of 
plywood. 



people who are planning vertical 
antenna projects. Feel free to 
drop me a line, SASE please." 
(Send your comments to Larry 
and not to WB8VGE,) 

Write to Larry Jones WB5KYK, 
at Rt 12, Box 139C. Laurel MS 
39440, Don't forget the SASE! 

Tve mentioned in the past about 
all those SWR meters, antenna 
switches, etc. we manage to put in 
line. Alan Pike WeMGF has a so- 
lution for a multitude of antennas 
and rigs. After spending a lot of 
time bent over the rigs, fiddling 
with coax connectors from this rig 
to that one, and trying to figure out 
which coax went where, Alan de- 



cided to re-engineer his antenna 
system . 

Alan has an antenna patch 
panel consisting of two rows of 
female connectors with quick 
disconnect patch cables. The 
panel was made from an old piece 
of piywood. The labels came from 
the sheet of pressure sensitive 
numbers and letters that come 
with video tapes. The top row 
goes to rigytuners. The bottom row 
is the termination point for his 
dipoles. Alan says, "It really 
speeds up changing antennas, 
and is a lot cheaper than coax 
switches." 

Talk Field Day. and hear all 



about antennas. Everyone want 
the ultimate death ray? Here are 
two antennas that have worked 
out quite well for the Zuni-Loopers 
Field Day group. Fred Turpi n^ Bob 
Spidell, and Cameron Hartford, 

The first antenna, the 20 meter 
Vee beam, is quite simple, It is 
two wavelengths of a leg, 1 39 feeL 
with an apex angle of 65 to 70 
degrees. This antenna was 
hauled into the pines to a height of 
50 feet. The antenna has a gain of 
about 5,5 dB, The Vee was found 
to have very low noise character- 
istics. 

The 40 meter long wire antenna 
is made of 207 feet of wire feed 



with about 75 feet of 300O 
twinlead through a tuner in end- 
Zepp fashion. Tuning was broad 
on 40 meters but sharp on 80 
meters. 

Next month, I'il continue with 
the soJar power series. After we 
finish applying solar power to our 
stations, we'lJ start building some 
receivers. 

If you write a request and don't 
send an SASE, you may not get 
a reply. I can be reached via 
CompuServe ID?^' 73357,222. 
Also, via packet from the KASZ 
BBS. Just tell whatever BBS to 
forward messages to me via 
KA8Z. 



Letters 



NumhGt 33 pn your Feedback card 



Fox Hunting Revival 

In Wayne's April editorial, he 
states that he hopes to get fox 
hunting revived in the US. I think 
this is a great idea, though fox 
hunting is not dead and has al- 
ready had its own revival. 

I can go on a mobile transmitter 
hunt at least 10 times a month in 
the Los Angeles area. In San 
Diego or Santa Barbara, there are 
additional hunts. These hunts are 
on 10i 6, 2, and 220, Participation 
in these hunts has grown 50 to 
100 percent in the last five years. 
We have every kind of hunt you 
can imagine. Some are simple 
hunts where the hidden T goes out, 
hides, and (almost) everyone finds 
him in the next one to three hours. 
Others are more speciaiized. 

The predominant style of fox 
hunting in Europe and Asia has 
never been popular in the US. 
With rare exceptions, US fox hunt- 
ing is mobile, while most fox hunt- 
ing in Europe is on foot^ as a physi- 
cal sport. The requirement for fox 
hunting is cross country running. 

84 73 AmBteur Radio • October, 



From the Hamshack 

IrvaEuropean or Asian fox hunt, 
it isn't unusual for up to five trans- 
mitters to be on the air at the same 
time, over hundreds of meters of 
hillside. Winning times of less 
than an hour are the norm, with 
the hunter being required ^o find 
all ftve transmitters, sometimes in 
a specific order. 

European style fox hunting 
would be an ideal activity at Scout- 
ing events. This may be a way to 
get students into ham radio. Inex- 
pensive DF receivers (that could 
also monitor the local repeaters), 
can be cheaply built. Building the 
receiver would give the Scouts ex- 
perience in electronics while the 
actual fox hunting would combine 
radio, the outdoors, and learning 
skills with a map and compass. 

How about a National Scouting 
Fox Hunting Championship? This 
would be an ideal way to get non- 
hams involved, since a license re- 
ally isn't necessary. 

T-hunting, as it is known in our 
country, has much to offer ham 
radio. T-hunting is a microcosm of 

1988 



ham radio, combining the cama- 
raderie of a meeting or Field Day, 
the fun of a contest, public ser- 
vice, and the satisfaction of home- 
brewing. Anyone can hunt. We 
have blind hams that do so regu- 
larly, using an audio S-meter 
when turning the beam, T-huntmg 
Is a natural for high school stu- 
dents since it combines cars, 
competition among friends, and 
electronics, 

Thomas H. Curlee WB6UZZ 

FullertonCA 

In Appreciation 

My husband and I are new to 
ham radio. I just upgraded to 
Tech in February, and the group 
of fellas where I took the test 
were very supportive and really 
pulling for me. They made me 
feel great- I'm very lucky to have 
met such a great bunch of guys, 
because had I run into some 
"Die Hards/' I probably never 
would have gotten into amateur 
radio. 

Earl Dugan, Director of the 
Greater Bridgeport Amateur 
Radio Club, reaily put me at ease 
and encouraged both of us, and 
still does. He always tells me that 
you can never ask a stupid ques- 



tion where radio is concerned. 
It's better to ask once or twenty 
times, rather than risk irreparable 
damage. 

Beth, our daughter, who has 
some learning disability, is getting 
the bug through the Handi Ham 
Courage Center. They're another 
great group. 

MtltieBlotneyKAIQOW 

Keene NH 

HI to Incarcerated Hams 

I am trying to form a new ama- 
teur radio organization called 
^'Hams Incarcerated" or "H\r 
The goals are: 1 . to promote com- 
munications among incarcerated 
hams; 2. improve public aware- 
ness of the ^ree public services 
rendered by ham radio; and 3. to 
establish an amateur radio station 
inside prison, primarily to provide 
public services, such as traffic 
handlers, net control, and emergen- 
cy communications assistance. 

If you are, or know, an incarcer* 
ated ham and you would like to 
QSO/QSL an incarcerated ham, 
please contact: 

Jim Cranlord 107159 

P.C. Unit N5AAN 

Rt. 2, Box 75 

Homer LA 71040 




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CIRCLE 142 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 



Numbef 31 on youf Feedback card 

INTERNATIONAL 



Notes from FN42 

And who, you ask, is CCC, re- 
ferred to above as the editor of this 
column? CCC Is the new Su- 
pereditor, named to honor all of 
this column's correspondents 
who from now on will be known by 
us as Hamtassadors for their 
countries. CCC is Chauncey 
Charles Cuthbraith: the name is a 
composite of several names of 
historic diplomats (real and imag- 
ined) since only such a Super- 
Hambassador (in real life the en- 
tire editorial staff) will be able to do 
justice to 73 Internationai from 
now on. A list of our Hambas- 
sadors will be published here ear- 
ly next year — // we haven t heard 
from you recently be sure to let us 
know right away that you are stilt a 
foreign correspondent for us; if 
you live in a country for which we 
have not recently had any reports^ 
let us know if you would like to 
be the Hambassador for your 
country. 

This month CCC brings you the 
first revision of The 73 interna- 
tionef Universal Permit Applica- 
tion. The changes from the first 
draft (published In January) were 
based on information you sent In; 
the next revision will appear as 
soon as you send us enough (1) 
additional useful suggestions for 
further changes, and most impor- 
tant now, (2) any special ir^forma- 
tion that your country requires in 
addition. This will be coded begin- 
ning with number 5t (see the 
form). Please refer to numbers 1- 
20, as appropriate, when making 
new suggestions; new additions 
to the basic form (if any) will be 
coded 21 through 49. When a final 
form has been developed, the 
numbers can be dropped, and the 
"Special Information" listed sep- 
arately, alphabetically by country, 

October's dates to spice up your 
QSOs: I^National Day in China, 
Cyprus, and Nigeria; 2 — Thanks- 
giving, Germany (10th for Can- 
ada); 3— National Foundation 
Day, South Korea; 4— Inde- 
pendence Day, Lesotho (12th 
for Equatorial Guinea, 28th for 
Czechoslovakia); 5 — Republic 
Day, Portugal (9th for Kmer Re- 
public, Cambodia; 29th for 
Turkey); 7 — Foundation Day, F. 
Germany; 8— Constitution Day, 
USSR; 10— Columbus Day, USA 



edited by CCC 

(12th for Latin America): Health- 
Sports Day, Japan; Kruger Day, 
South Africa; 12 — Universal Chil- 
drens Day; National Holiday, 
Spain (22nd for the Vatican, 26th 
for Austria, 28th for Greece); 14 — 
Young Peoples Day, Zaire; t5— 
Evacuation Day, Tunisia; 17^ 
fi4others Day, Malawi; 20^1944 
Revolution Anniversary, Guate- 
mala; 21— Revolution Day, Soma- 
lia; 22 — Labor Day, New Zealand; 
23 — Chulalongkron's Day, Thai- 
land; the 24th is United Nations 
Day; 27—3Ts Day, Zaire; 31— 
Bank Holiday y Ireland. 

Roundup 

Norfolk IsTand (Australia). A 

report from Kirsti VK9NL will ap- 
pear next month (we hopet) and 
will be under the Island's own flag 
(standard). Norfolk is the Pine 
Tree fsland — the Aurokaria, 
which is grown in pots all around 
the world. A quick note here, how- 
ever, to those awaiting QSLs: re- 
member that one IRC means sur- 
face mail, i,e,, boat. And boats 
depart Norfolk Island only every 
other month. Be pattent. (Also 
don't send SASEs with Australian 
stamps— can't be used from Nor- 
folk Island!) More on this in her 
report. 

Japan. The Japan Amateur Ra- 
dio League, Inc. (JARL) has be- 
gun a monthiy newsletter, The 
JARL News, in English, '*to 
provide amateur operators, radio 
clubs, and radio regulatory orga- 
nizations, throughout the world, 
with news {of] Japan that might be 
of interest." according to Shozo 
Hara JAtAN, JARL president. 
The first issue was for June, 1988. 
Up-to-the-minute news of the am- 
ateur satellite, F-O-l 2^ also will be 
provided. No subscription infor- 
mation was given, so write JARL. 
14-2, Sugamo 1-chome, Tishima- 
ku, Tokyo 170, Japan. One June 
news item given: Station BY7HY 
began operating from Yueyang 
City in Hunan Province, China, in 
May. JARL contributed some 
equipment and Noboru Takada 
JG2GNX led a five-member dele- 
gation to the opening ceremony. 

In the July issue a list of special 
event stations was given, only one 
of which will still be operating thfs 
month (the issue was received 
July 25th, a week before the dead- 
line for this October column). Oc- 
tober 23 will be the last day for 



8J3SLK, operating from Nara City 
at the site of the Nara Silkroad 
Expo. Ending transmissions on 
September 18 on 3.5-2400 MHz 
(all modes) were 8J2XPO, 
8J7XPO, and 8J8XPO, 8J4XPO 
and 8J5XPO closed down on Au- 
gust 31, 8J1HAM closed on Au- 
gust 28, and 8J(3ATC, which 
logged 16,561 QSOs with 86 
countries in 12 days in April, oper- 
ated from Niigata for the 9th Asian 
Tabletennis Championship. 

Korea. HL5AP seems stilJ to be 
QRL, but Steve Bozak HL9VX {"I 
read your fine magazine all the 
time and think it's great/') writes 
that reciprocal amateur licenses 
are on the way. "All the paper 
work is in and the wait is on for the 
government to work out details. [I 
hope] all Will be finished by the 
end of this year." He reports that 
packet radio is growing fast, with 
nodes and gateways on the air 
linking 10, 20 and 2 meters, most- 
ly near Seoul About ten operators 
are on packet. "Listen for us on 
14.103 MHz. U.S. west coast has 
been coming in nightfy/' [Thanks 
for the info, Steve, and we'd 
appreciate more news from 
there.— CCC] 

Mexico. The Radio Club de 
N uevo Leon A.C . , Arq. Javier de la 
Garza EX2PAG, president, is of- 
fering an Internationai Special 
25th Anniversary Award for two- 



way contacts, any authorized 
band or mode, with any three of 
the 45 RCNL members, who will 
be using the special prefix 4C2 
instead of XE2 for the valid-con- 
tact period, July 24, 1988 to July 
24, 1989 inclusive- For award and 
QSL cards, send by registered 
mail a list of contacts with date, 
GMT time, frequency, mode, 
RST, with QSL cards, US$5 mon- 
ey order, self-addressed 9" x 11- 
1/2" envelope and IRC, to: Gino 
Decanini XE2GDD, PO Box 441, 
Monterrey, N.L, 64000 Mexico. 

Togo. Denny 5V7WD writes 
'Trom the Shack of the Togo 
Witch Doctor" that he and Diane 
(Dennis and Diane Washer) have 
moved from Kpalime to: Mission 
ABWE— Aviation, BP.228, Kara, 
Togo, West Africa, with the 5-me* 
ter-long homemade wooden tow- 
er, yagi (with no rotor), TS-430, 
SB-200, and straight key. They 
are "set up on 80-10 (including 
WARC) and looking forward to the 
first 160 contact." They maintain 
an informal weekday roundtable 
with the manager, W84LFM, on 
21325± at 1245 Zulu— all are wel- 
come. The ham population in- 
cludes Steve 5V7SA and his 
younger brother, Ron 5V7RW, 
and a number of transients, '1 
handle the bureau cards for these 
hard-to-lind folk," He says 40 and 

80 have had good openings into 

Cominued on page 90 



CiMiniT — Ti^Tiniiir III II iiriiii_ 




^'wjiiw 



MEXICO 



mmi^m 





THE RADIO CLUB DE MMEVO LEOn, A.C, 

QRAflTS Jai5 iriTERMTlQMAL SgECiAL AWARD 

TO. 

ByCOMPLYIhQ THE ^IQUiRtzD QOffTACT WITH TtlE PO-LO- 

lli THE ZSTti ^ - iVERSARV CELEBRATIOM 
MONTERREY; M L MCMCO -.^«»s^.^^L988 




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CDlNFlfiMlfriG TWO m'fCd** TACT 



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73^ F(10« 



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73 Amateur Radio • October, 1988 87 



The 73 International 
Universal Permit Application 



The following-named radio amateur respecfully requests the permission of the government of.^ — 

to operate amateur radio equipment in the country. If permission is granted, \, the undersigned, agree to operate in accordance with the rufes, 
regufations and conditions estabiished by the pernrit-issuing government, by the terms and conditions of the bilateral agreement (if any) 
between the permit-issuing country and my country, rules of the (ITUf Geneva Radio Regulations governing radio operations^ and the rules 
and regulations of my country. Furthermore, i certify that the following information is true and accurate. 

Full signature: Date: — -. 



PERSONAL [^FORMATION 



1 . Family Name(s) 2. Given Name(5} 



3. Country of Residence 4. Citizen? by Birth? Naturalized? 

5. Nationality,—^, S- Place/Date of Birth 

7. Home Address 

8. Personal description ( If not Included on passport or other offical ID attached here— Cotor hair, eyes^ weight, height): 

9. Attach photocopies of passport pages showing name, number, and other selected data. (If passport not required for entry, attach 
photocopies of Birth Certificate and offical ID showing picture— such as Drivers License.) 

10. Occupation (profession and place of employment) 

AMATEUR RAOIO INFORMATION 

11. Callsign 12. Operation license number (if any) and class 

13, Expiratton date (It none given attach notorized certificate that license Is valid) 

14. Attach photocopy of license (If Morse speed not shown, indicate here) 



INFORMATION ABOUT PLANNED VISIT 

1 5. Arrival/permit to be effective date - 1 6. Departure/permit end date 

1 7, Address(es) in permit Country 



18. Location(s) of operation(s) ____=_^^^^^^^_^^^^^^^ 

19. Description of equipment (brands, models, XMTR, RCVR, XCVR, power amps, antenna(s), power, bands, and types of emissions 



20. Point and manner of entry of operator and equipment into Country 



50. SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR THIS PERMIT-ISSUING COUKTRY (If any) 



SI. 
§2. 

54. 



Here is the first revision of the Universal form. 10/38, based on input from PY1 APS, 0K3CMZ, SV1 IW, 4X1 1 MK, I2MQP, JARL, XE1 MKT, ZL2VR, 
CT4UE, SM(&COP, BV2A/2B, and others. Most Countries seem to want the above information: some items have been omitted as rarefy required. 
"Speclaf Information" wanted wilt be fisted elsewhere. 

The next steps: (1) Comments on this from anybody, anywhere; (2\ unofficial approval (with added changes?} from ^qu on behalf of your Country : 
(3) any special information required by your Country which i$ not listed either on this page or on the "Special Info'' list elsewhere in 73 tnternationai 

The next revision will be published in about six months-please send us your contributions now - while you are thinking about it. Maytye the next 
revision will be good enough to send out for official national reaction! 

Some "Special Information'' for some countries appeared In earlier columns this year; this will be repeated with the next revision of the form, on 
a separate sheet (or on the back of the form), f^eanwhile, remember that you can get forms specifically for Japan by sending us an SASE (SASE with 
2 IBCs from outside the US— see April issue, p. 99); and the Italian Association (ARI) has offered considerable assistance to permit-seekers — see 
May issue, p. 93. Any other national associations willing to provide assistance to permit-seekers, let us know! 

BB 73 Amateur Radio • October, 1 988 



— ^"-'^^ ._■—■-■-■- — i,„Mrtv-' -.^j^jv....!, i Mfnnr *■ ■-^.v^.-v^ -^-^•^■■■^ 



JAPANESE (JARL) BAND PLAN 

50 MHz 10.4 GHz 

(To be effective January 1 , 1989) 



SiMH? Barxf 



144MHz Band 



43AM H J Band 



1200MHz aand 



&0.00 
50.1Q 



50.40 
&0.5Q 



CW, Dala 



144.00 
144.02 

144 to 



51.00 



52,00 



S2 50 
52 7& 



54.00 



Images 



AWSSB.CW 






FMi 



144:40 

144. SO 

i<44.$0 
144.7S 



145.00 



AM/SSe, CW 



Data, Imagfia 



145.^0 



All modas 



14S.60 



T46.00 



EME 
CW, Dam 



AM/SSB, CW 



Images 



430 00 
430.10 



430 90 

.:431 00 

431. &0 

431 90 
432.10 



431.00 



Dala, Imagea 



^34 .00 



435 00 



CdFlrn^lr^QU^ncy 



FM 



dja.oo 



AH modes 



439.00 



SaE?iEiie 



44DI.0O 



CW. Data 

AM/SSB.CW 

Imager 
Dala, Irriaget 

FM 

FM 

Call^irig freqijelcy 
(£m9fg*rM;y comm rre<|,S 



12S0.M 



f 270. 00 
1?73.[3D 



fleiwfllef 



Satellile 



AJI rrhO<B&5 



R^iueal^r 



2400MHz Band' 



SeOOM-HzBand 



24W.00 



2405.00 



2419.00 



2422.00 



2424,00 
2424.50 

2424.90 

£425.00 



2439.00 



3436.00 



2442.00 



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^455.00 



SateNlte 



5^50.00 



5470,00 



5&go.oo 



ATV 



Repeater 



ST^.OO 
573D.00 

5737.00 



Dsis. Images 
— AH'SSB, CW 

*-- Calling Ire^^u&ncy |5|f gg; 

^^ 5762.00- 

S?66 00 ■ 



5770 00 



i0.1/ia.4GHzBand 
tO.CMW 



SstelliEs 



10.025 



Repeater 



ATV 

Repealer 
Data, Images. 

FM 



1O.D@0 




Repfiatsr 



ATV 



10:150 



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seiooo 



All modes 



5830.00 



5ei50.Od- 



-1^—- Btacon 




— FM 

-1 — Cabling rrequency^ 

*^ AM/SSS, CW 
^"^ Dala. Imsge^ 
Repeater 


10.175 
lO.lfiO 



10.19D 



AJI mrotfes 



Hecwalef 



Saleilitfi' 



10.235 — ^ 

T0.237 

10.240 — 

10.242 — 

f0 24&^ 

10 250 



All modsB 



R^^eatflir 

Refhsaier 

Dala. Images 



FM 



■^ — Baacon 

— AM/SSB. CW 

— Data. Images 



1290.00 



3233.00 



1294.00 

12&4.50 
1294.60 

1^95.00 

t?95.aa 

12^.30 



f^r.so 



1 300.00 



10.450 



10.500 



SaleNil'S 



Raps alar 



ATV 



Repealer 
OatA. Images 

AM/^sas, CW 

Baacon 

FM 

Calling fr-6Kiuenc/ 

(EmargenicyciKnm. ireq.) 



Daia, Images 



AH modes 



SaiallitB 
All mcHisG 



-v.. rfifflaiY^gw 



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\ 



73 Am^tBur Radio • October, 1988 S9 



m 



Continued from pBgs 87 




Spyros 5&4MF in his shack. 



the States around 0600 local time, 
and me West Coast is good then 
on 20 meters. Wishes he could get 
into computef RTTY, and invites 
"anyone wanting to get rid of a 
setup [to] throw it this way!'' He'll 
be N4EXB next. 

USSR. Last month we gave 
UA9MA's Oblast number as 
168. According to The ''DXNS" 
U.S.S.R Obtast Guide published 



by Geoff Watts. Editor of the OX 
News Sheet, Omsk is in Oblast 
146. The 13-page guide lists and 
locates on outline maps all 184 
oblasts comprehensively and 
gives contest mformation. (It can 
be obtained for 1 U.K. pound, or 
by airmail for US$3 or 6 iRCs— no 
foreign checks — the same price 
as for his 11 -page OXCC Coun- 
tries Guide or the 15-page Radio 



Amateur Prefix-Countfy-Zone 
List. Write him at 62 Belmore Rd.. 
Nonwich. NR7 OPU, England.) 




CYPRUS 

Ans Kaponldes 5&4JE 
PO Box 1 723 
Umassol 
Cyprus 

Although Cyprus has a large 
number of radio amateur licenses 
compared to its population (550 
among 650.000), the really active 
amateurs on the HF bands do not 
exceed a dozers. One of the most 
active is Spyros 5B4MF. now 19 
years old. 

A serious DXer and contester. 
Spyros came first worldwide in the 
lARU HF championship last year, 
using the special call H25MF, i 
had a short interview with him at 
the CARS annual meeting, and 
learned that he started at age 12* 
in 1930. as a pupil of the English 
School in Nicosia. He operated 
from the school club station. 
5B4ES, and got his own license 
in 1982. 



5B4MF was third worldwide In 
the 1983 WPX contest <SSB) on 
10, and was in the 1 0m ARRL con- 
test as 5B4XX. He was 7th world- 
wide on 15m SSB in the 1984 
WPX contest, second in the Eu- 
ropean DX contest in 1985^ using 
5B25MF. and operated as P36P in 
the 1986 CQDX contest and as 
ZC4DX in the CQDX 1987 contest 
(with 2C4AP. 5B4SA and 4Z4DX). 
This year he was H22H in the CO 
WPX contest, with 5B4SA and 
5B41P. 

Spyros has the DXCC. WAZ, 
WPX. and got the third 560XCC 
in Cyprus, His station consists of 
an FT102. FL2100Z. a TH3MKIII 
tribander. di poles for 40 and 80 
and an inverted-V dipole for 160. 
Mostly on SSB, he is on CW occa- 
sionally. He is now fmishrng his 
national service in the army, and 
this month smarts his University 
studies in England, reading Engi- 
neering and Computer studies. 
He promised to answer any pend^ 
ing OSL cards first! 
[5B4JE reports Ihat ait Cyprus 
beacons (S&4CY) of CARS are in 
very good working order (28 MHz, 
50 and 70) and are much appreci- 
ated by foreign amateurs. 

—CCC] 



Never Say Die 

Continued from page 6 

Atlanta was hot in July, Moo, 
boy it was hot. Big surprise. I won- 
der if this is the best time for a 
hamfesl here? On Sunday, after 
Ihe hamfest fizzled out, Sherry 
and I headed for the Atlanta Zoo. I 
understand theyVe working on 
getting Atlanta Underground go- 
ing again. That used to be fun a 
few years ago— then teenage 
gangs ruined it. 

Discrimination? 

Are hams going to wait for some 
affirmative action legislation be- 
fore we make an effort to attract 
minority groups? 

How many Chmese, Indian, 
Black. Hispanic and so on hams 
have you run into on the air? How 
many at hamtests? I gel to a zillion 
hamfests and I'll tell you, they are 
tew and far between. 

For that matter^ even in Africa, 
about 99% of the hams I've met or 
worked have been White. This is 
one of the reasons amateur radio 
has had so Itltle support from the 
African countries. They see ama- 
teur radio as a While man 's hobby 
and the ham bands as billions of 
dollars of radio spectrum reserved 
for this tiny White elite to use pure- 
ly as a playground . I don't think 

90 73 Amateur Radio • October, 



they realize that the Japanese 
outnumber the American hams 
about five to one, but they sure 
realize how few Black hams there 
are in the world— including all of 
Africa, 

I realize that the fong term 
presen/ation of our hams bands fs 
not high on your list of priorities— 
probably right up there with stop- 
ping the genocide in Portugese 
Timor. But the next time you run 
into a Black who shows even the 
slightest interest in amateur radio, 
it's something to feel guilty about 
ill you turn him away, 

Our ham bands have been 
saved at the Geneva ITU confer- 
ences twice now through ftukes. 
With one-countryp one-vote, the 
third world can easily upset our 
applecart. It's only through their 
tack of cooperation among them- 
selves that we have our bands 
right now. 

Getting back to Atlanta— I want 
to see every able-bodied southern 
ham there next year. The South 
shaJi rise again — and go to Atlanta. 

If you actually did go this year 
and have any ideas on ways to 
make the hamfest more fun, drop 
me a line. They had some fine 
talks — a big flea market — darned 
few commercial exhibitors— an 
amazing bunch of computers and 

1988 



software— must have been at 
feast 30% of the show. I think 
they'll find a better location than 
the Omni Center next year. 

The May FCC Figures 

When I warned that they woufd 
be down compared to 1987, I got 
flack as a doom and gloomer- 
and wrong „ Sure. Heck, wey're 
only down 56%— no big deal, 

WSYI published the FCC fig- 
ures for the last three years^too 
bad if you don't subscribe so you 
could get the bad news eariy, Dur- 
ing the last twelve months Ihe 
number of new amateur licenses 
dropped by 21 %. June-May 1986/ 
87 was 26.500. June-May 1967/88 
wa s 20.893. That's a 5.067 drop. 
That's 21%. And those are the 
FCC figures. 

In January we were down 47% 
from last year. If February we 
were only down 14%. tn March 
the Novice Enhancement seemed 
to bring em out of the woodwork 
briefly, so we were up 243% over 
last year. April was down t9%t> 
from 1957 and June was a disas* 
ter, down a whopping 56%. 

If you can see any signs that any 
approach to getting more hams is 
working, please advise. I don't 
see any indtcation that Novice 
Enhancement is making any long 



term changes. I don't see any sign 
that ham clubs are changing their 
pattern of ignoring the problem, I 
don't see any rush from the zil- 
lions of Archie comic books the 
League has distributed. What I 
see is a growth of 1 .5% per year 
for the last three years— and the 
possibtlity that this may be com- 
pletely imaginary, a figment of the 
FCC's not really knowing any 
more how many older hams have 
died. If 1.5% of the Silent Keys 
haven't been removed from the 
FCC*s list, even that smalt growth 
may be illusory. 

In the years after WWII, for sev- 
enteen years we had a growth of 
11% per year. That stopped 25 
years ago. If you've got a comput- 
er handy you can check it out— 
our growth from about 300,000 
hams to 437.000 m 25 years 
comes out to an average growth of 
1 .5% per year— right where we've 
been for the last three years. At 
that i^te we'll catch up to where 
Japan is right now in about 110 
years. One thing we know posi- 
tively for sure: What weVe tieen 
doing toward gettmg new hams 
has been a total flop. Now we 
know how NOT to do it. 

So let's stop with the polyanna 
baloney and get serious about 
getting amateur radio growingj 



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213-390-8003 



CIRCLE 272 ON READER StAVtCE CARD 



i 



73 Amateur Radio • October. 1988 91 



Others May Try to Imitate, But 



••ft 



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-*^^te. Advanced Eleclronii: Applk;a!^onfi, Irw. 



Model i K 



THRESHOLD 



DCD 



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PAKRATT 232 



STATUS 



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Morse Code - Baudot - ASCII - AMTOR - Packet - Facsimile - Navte 



ateur Net Price $31 9l 



It's a lesson you learn very early in life. Many can be good, some may be better, but only one can be 
the best. The PK-232 is the best multi-mode datu controller you can boy. 



1 Versatility 



The PK-232 should be listed in the 
amateur radio dictionary under the 
word Versatile, One data controller 
that can transmit and receive in six 
digital modes« and can be used with 
almost every computer or data ter- 
minal. You can even monitor Navtex, 
the new marine weather and naviga- 
tional system. Don't forget two radio 
ports for both VHF and HE and a no 
coiBpromise VKF/HF/CW iniemal 
modem wiih an eight pole l>andpa.ss 
filter followed by a limiter dis- 
criminator with automatic threshold 
conlrol. 

The internal decoding program 
(SIAM^"^ feature can even identify 
different types of signals for you, in- 
cluding some simple types of RTTY 
encryption. The only software your 
computer needs is a terminal program. 













ttdm- li^ivc* Mtk. hit a Ea iii*»l«*l4l 



sraa 









ri aM= II" »**■ n ni 




PC Pakratt Packet TX/RX Display 



Facsimile Screen Display 

2 Software Support 

While you can use most modem or 
communications programs with the 
PK*232, AEA has two very special 
packages available exclusively for the 
PK-232 „„PC Pakratt with Fax for 
IBM PC and compatible computers, 
and Com Pakratt with Fax for the 
Commodore 64 and 1 28. 

Each package includes a terminal 
program with split screen display^ 
QSO buffer, disk storage of received 
daia, and printer operation, and a 
second program for transmis- 
sjon/reception and screen display of 
facsimile signals. The IBM programs 
are on 5-1/4"' disk and the Com- 
modore program^s are plug- in ROM 
cartridges. 



3 Proven Winner 

No matter what computer or ter- 
minal you plan to use, the PK-232 is 
the best choice for a multi-mode data 
conlToller. Over 20,000 amateurs 
around the world have on-air tested 
the PK-232 for you. They, along with 
most major U.S, amateur magazines, 
have reviewed the PK-232 and found 
it to be a good value and excellent ad- 
dition to the ham station. 

No other multi-mode controller of- 
fers the features and perfonnance of 
ihe PK-232, Don't be fooled by imita- 
tions, j^sk your friends, or call the 
local amateur radio store. We're con- 
fident the PK-232 reputation will con- 
vince you that it's time to order your 
very own PK-232. 

Call an authorized AEA dealer 
today. You deserve the best you can 
buy^ you deserve the PK- 232. 

Advanced Electronic 
Applications, Inc. 

PC. Box C-2160 
Lynnwood, WA 98036 

206-775-7373 



AEA 



Brings you tKe 
BreaktnrougK! 



CIRCLE es ON READER SEAVICE CARD 



LOGWRITE" 

Arc ytM lired ol wn%tLn^ your tim^ ami nioncf on suh par 
''^S''"!! jTMgrariss' fifing your stiiiicin inJi* iht t;t>inpul:cr n^f 

vyuTi LtkiVV'RJTE rhi^ qimlity miTtu LlfivL'n. ust-r fricttiJJy 

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the pfrftrl acceiist>ry fur ilie fampk-tr ham "iLatLDn U ^inipli- 

tiir opcratioiii adJ nivc. vnu thL* i-unipeijiivc udfiv in 

"- 5Md U>iir|; LOGWRITE wf^h& wiih all IBM K*s 

LOCf H'KTTE I' luutfUC iptil fcreen fcfllurt' Allows for simukLa 
ncutni lossii^ snd lent proi^sHiig. to^mt Jif^ttmes mxJtxk 

In^carilcaPsgnior pitrfiv yearch 
Pf rnr EiJii or Virw rccoatb 
rirnty nJ lootn fur notds It naddTusacii 
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Of taAl I (SOCQ 34S-4 1 S« c!xt 54 lo order wnh V'Ua/ Miul cnr«fd 
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WHEN DOES ONE EQUAL TWO? 

V\ HKN ITS A TAD m Bl TRANSCEIVER 
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"Give your repeater something 

to celebrate!" 

The new RC-96 controller for your repeater will make Its day. And yours. 

For you, remote programming will lei you easily make changes to your repeater from 
anywhere without a trip tu iJic hiJl. Change codes, autodial nurnl>ers, ID messages and 
more, with reliable storage in E^prqjvi memory. 

Your users will love Ihe outstanding patch and autodlaler^ wilh room for 200 phone 
numtieis. The talking S- meter wiU lei them check their signal strength into the repeater. 
Plus support for pocket parens, linking to other repeaters, and a bulletiii board. 

Your technical crew wllJ appreciate the built-in kf^Tjad and Indicators^ And the case of 
hookup through shielded DIN cables. With pots and DIP switches casOy accessible at the 
rear of the unit. They'll be Impressed by the gas discharge tube across the phone line and 
transient supressors on each I/O signal to keep lightning from taking your system 
down. 

And most important, your repeater will have a new sense of pride in being al)le to serve 
you better. You'll even hear It In its voiecf 

Sorrtething for eveiyone. A real party animal! 




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The RC-96 Repeater Controller 
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NAME 

ADDRESS 



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CHICLE 1 ON READER S£RVtC£ CARD 



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Mineral WeJIs. Texas 76067 

(817) 325-1386 

CmCUL 2£S ON HEADER SEHViCE CARD 



Kumbef 32 on yoyr Feedback card 




RRATA 



Corrections 



September Cover 
Credit 

We give our very special belated 
thanks to Mr. Ken NeiBon of Oakham, 
Massachusetts for affowing us to 

photograph his tower 



Digital Voice 
Compression^ 
June '88 

Refer lo page 52. The decimal points 
tetween numbers wlfhout spaces should 
be fraction bars. In the first column, para- 
graph 3. it should read 1/7000; in para- 
graph S, 1/30-1/50, 1/7000, 7000/50, 
and again 1/30-1/50. In the second 
column, paragraph 1, it should be ''1/30 
of a second/' 

Brief iy Spealdng 
RS'232—June '88 

Rfifer to page 40. Table 1 had two 
columns labeled "From DCE" and "To 
DTE.'' The second column should have 
been 'VFrom DTE." 



The Pee Wee Thirty 
Transceiver- 
September '88 

Refer to page 33. The image of the 
dfcuit board, i.e. folio traces (shown in 
the lower left hand comer), is reversed. 




FREE 



IBM - PC 

SOFTWARE CATAIOG 



■ Ftir Hiim>. Blcctrical En- 
^mi^^rs and Finicky K' 
Users, 

« Htindreds of programs 
t4-^lcd nj IDS's ngiil sUktt- 

" IDS\ pfc?iiiiem i^ u HAM ^jfxl turd ro p4ca<^. Only 
30^ or !h< pro^r4m.v ^uhnnncU fof letting nrnkf it lo 

Pi\>grams IndttUc: 

CW CODH PRACTICE • CONTECT LOG • jctunttc 

BEAM KliADlNGS * GRAPHIC on -scree n-pA^rr% 

CALCULATORS -CIRCUIT DHSIGN AIDS ' Mipcr- 

rtv^fed PROMO ATION FORFCASTING ■ TERM I 

NALRMULATIOM 

NONE Of CILR niSKS COST (HER $3.95!I 

P\ea^ ^fkl y%nit HdtVtc ami AtMt^w f^e ^im\d be ^ralcfiil {iif 

INTERCON Data Systems 

Dept. 7f P.O. Box 696 
Gjimbrlils, MD 2 I 0S4-0696 



CIRCLE 3S8 ON R£«OEI? SERVICE CARD 

S4 73 Amateur Radio • October, I9a8 



Simpie OsciHator 
Circuit— June '88 

Refer to page 74. A piece of informa* 
tion is missing on the circuit using the 98 
MHztoroid, The output is 1 kHz. Also, the 
purpose of varying the BIOS is to obtain 
the best waveform. An oscilloscope is re- 
quired. 

Contest resu its- 
August *88 

Sincere apologies to N40KX who was 
incorrectly fisted as N4tKX in the results 
of the 1967 160 meter SS6 contest. 
These results were published in the Au- 
gust 19B3 issue on page 74, 

Digicom > 64— 
August '88 

Refer to page 22, IC2b, pin 4. in Figure 
1 should NOT be connected to pins 6 
and 7. Pin 4 is connected to the ^5V 
supply and CI 2 on(y. Pin 6 is connected 
directly lo pin 7. 
Note also the author's new address: 

Barry N. Kutnur. M.D, W2LiP 
614-lt I'alnicr Lane 
Yardley, PA 19067 

QTHDX Japan- 
September '88 

Refer to page 89. The number of hams 
in Japan, the ratio of hams to Japanese 
residents, and the per-residents com- 
parison with hams in the United States 
were stated incorrectly. 

There are 1 ^ 608, 128 amateur licenses 
in Japan, according to the Japanese 
Amateur Radio League. That's equiva- 
lent of one ham for every 75 Japanese 
residents^ more than seven times the 
United States ratio of one ham for every 
544 residents. 

We reported there are 33.043 hams in 
Japan p the number given in the 1988 
Radfo Amateur Caflbook . However, that 
figure includes only those Japanese 
hams whose calls are reported to the 
Caflbook, Based on that figure, our 
article mistakenly staled thai one out of 
every 3,674 Japanese residents is a 
ham. and incorrectly noted that ratio as 
about one-seventh of the ratio of the 
United States. 



C<mnnuedfTt>m pagei I 

program, and called up Gerry's new digital 
picture. There it was. a PSTV image of an 
attractive yonns ladv with the message 
^^FROM WEHRNY" hanging jusi bcksw her 
chin. For the second time thai evening, I 
leaped straight up from the chair and let out a 
hollar. 

My wife hanged an the floor upstairs. 
**Are you all right down there?'' she warned 
to know. **Bctter than that/' I shouted. 
"Take a look at this/* In her own special 
way, she studied die picture on the ?^reen. 
*'Nice/* she mumbled and headed back 
upstairs. TranitLating that from XYL jargon 
to ham lingo, she was as impressed as 
I was. 

With the error-free capability of packet ra- 
dio. Packet Scan Television pictures like this 
can be transmitted over long distances (liter- 
ally worldwide when Liund conditions per- 
mit). The only requirements are that both 
users have the appropriate software to create 
and display the images, and thai the pictures 
t>e prepared in advance. 

Improvement Ideas 

That last problem cotitd be taken care of 
nicely with a software niodiOcation, written 
especially to send the digitized informaiion 
direeily to the packci TNC as it become*^ 
available, or on command. This would re- 
quire a second pon on the computer » however 
(one for ihe digitizer and one for the TNC). 
The C-64 contains additional ports for the 
cassette drive and joystick, one of which 
could be used lo drive the TNC. 

With higher packet baud rales* such a.s may 
t>e used on UHF frequencies, it would also be 
possible to speed up the transfer so that each 
picture cnuld be transmitted as soon as it is 
avaiiabic (about one picture every 2.8 sec- 
onds w iih ihe Kinney system). This is a pro- 
ject for future study* 

In the two years in which I have had a TNC, 
packet radio has provided me with many 
pleasures, including rag-chewing, traffic 
handling for the National Traffic System, 
computer program transfers, and now 
''Packet Scan Television," This latest appli- 
cation of packet radio may be slow and take a 
bit of planning, but it sure works well and 
resuhs in a perfect copy of the originat picture 
which appears at the other end. 

The growth of Packet Scan Television is 
now in your hands. If you are intrigued by 
this new mode, give it a try. If you have some 
creative experiments in mind and are looking 
for a willing partner, get in touch with me via 
the WA8O0H PBB^ in Livonia. Michigan. 
My mental buffer is 0|?cn to your sugges- 
tions. 



Foolnotes: 

'Kinney Software* 974 Hodsdon 
Road, Pownal, Maine 04069 

^Versions of the circuit and software 
arc available for other computers also* 
Consult Kinney Softw^are tor details. 

^Print Shop* written by Broderbund 
Software and copy written by PiKellite 
Software, is readily available at most 
computer siores or mail order houses. 




p 



I 



Dyncimite 



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Universal switched outputs control your call 
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anCLE 133 ON READER SEAVICE CARD 



^su's FT-736R. 
Because you never know 

who's Jistening. 



Why just dream of talking 
beyond earth? 

With Yaesu's new FT-736R 
VHF/UHF base station, you 
can discover some of the best 
DX happening in ham radio. 
Via moonbounce.ltopo. Aurora. 
Meteor scatter. Or satellites. 

You see, the FT-736R is the 
most complete, feature-packed 
rig ever designed for the serious 
VHF/UHF operator. But you'd 
expect this of the successor to 
our legendary FT-726R. 

For starters, the FT-736R 
comes fectory-equipped for 
SSB, CWand FM operation on 
2 meters and 70 cm (430-450 
MHz!), with two additional slots 
for optional 50-MHz, 220-MHz, 
or 1.2-GHz modules. 

Crossband full duplex capa- 
bility is built into eveiy FT-736R 
for satellite work. And the satel- 




lite tracking function (normal 
and re\^rse modes) keeps you 
on target through a transponder. 

The FT-736R delivers 25 
watts RF output on 2 meters, 
220 MHz, and 70 cm. And 10 
watts on 6 meters and 1.2 GHz. 
Store frequencj; mode, PL 
frequency, and repeater shift 
in each of the 100 memories. 

For serious VHF/UHF work, 
use the RF speech processor. 
IF shift. IF notch filter CWand 
FM \\ide/narro\v IF filters. 
VOX. Noise blanker. Three- 
position ^C selection. Preamp 
svritch for activating your 



tower-mount preamplifier. Even 
an offset display for measuring 
observed Doppler shift on 
DX links. 

And to custom design your 
FT-736R station, choose from 
these popular optional accesso- 
ries: Iambic kever module. 
FTS-8 CTCSS encode/decode 
unit. FVS-1 voice synthesizer. 
FMP-1 AQS digital message 
display unit. 1.2-GHz ATV mod- 
ule. MD-1B8 desk microphone. 
E-736 DC cable. And CAT 
(Computer Aided Ttansceiver) 
system soft\vare. 

Discover the FT-736R at 
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first make plenty of room for 
exotic QSL cards. Because 
you never know who's listening. 







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Yaem USA1721tl Edwards Road, Cerritos, GA 90701 (213) 404-2700. Repair St^rvica: (213) 404'4S84. Part.^: (213) 404 4^47 



Pricts 4Uid spedfcilitms suiyec ■ iing*^ without ii PL is a re;|Uiten?d traderoaft <af MolUTOla^ \t\t., fT7^6k bhtmn with 22(J MHx (^ii illfil 

CHICLE 161 Of! R£AD€A SERVICE CARD 








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pacesetter in Amateur Radio 



Affordable DX-ing! 



TS-140S 

HF transceiver with general 
coverage receiver. 

Compact, easy-to-use* full of oper- 
ating enhancements, and feature 
packed. These words describe the 
new TS-140S HF transceiver Setting 
the pace once again, Kenwood intro- 
duces new innovations in the world 
of ^iook-alike" transceivers! 

• Covers all HF Amateur bands with 
100 W output. General coverage re- 
ceiver tunes from 50 kHz to 35 MHz. 

(Receiver ipecrfrcaiions guaranreetf from 

500 kH2 lo 30 MHz) Modifiabte for HF 

MARS operation. (Permit requtfem 

• All modes built-in. LSB. USB. CW FM 
and AM, 

• Superior receiver dynamic range 

Kenwood DynaMix " high sensitivity 
direct nnixing system ensures true 102 
dB receiver dynamic range. 




• New Feature! Programmable band 
marker. Useful for staying within the 
limits of your ham license. For con- 
testers, program in the suggested 
frequencies to prevent QRM to non- 
participants. 

• Famous Kenwood fnterference 
reducing circuits. IF shift, dual noise 
blankers, RIT, RF attenuator, selectable 
AGC. and FM squelch. 



• M.CH/VFO CH sub-diaL 10 kHz step 
tuning for quick QSY at VFO mode, and 
UP/DOWN memory channel for easy 
operation. 

• Selectable fuH (QSK) or semi 
break-in CW. 

• 31 memory channels. Store fre- 
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selection. Split frequencies may be 
stored in 10 channels for repeater 
operation, 

• RF power output control. 

• AMTOR/PACKET compatible! 

• Built-in VOX circuft. 

« MC-43S UP/ DOWN mic. included. 

Optional Accessories: 

• AT-130 compact antenna lun^r • AT* 2 50 airto- 
m^r ina tuner •HS-5/HS-6/HS-7 head- 
phones • IF-232C/IF-10C compyteF ^ntertace 

• MA-5/VP-1 HF mobile antenna [5 bands) 

• MB-430 mobile bracket • MC''43S extra 
UP/DOWN hand mtc. • MC-55 (6- imm) goose neck 
mobile mic, * MC-60A/MC'80/MC-85 disk mics. 

• PG-2S ejctra DC cabie • PS-430 power supply 

• SP*40/SP-50B mobile speakeTS •SP-430 
external speaker • SW'lOOA/SW-2O0A/SW-2OO0 
SWFl/power meters •TL-922A 2 kW PEP linear 
ampfitier (not for CWQSK) * TU-8 CTCSS lone unit 

• YG-455C-1 500 Hz deluite CW later, YK-455C-1 
New 500 Hi CW filter. 




1 






TS-680S 



Alhmode multi-bander 

• 6m (50 &4 MHz) 10 W output plus ai( Hf 
Amateur bands (100 W output) 

• ExierKled 6m receiver frequency range 45 MHz 
lo 60 MHz. Specs. Quaranteed from 50 to 54 MHz. 

• Same funclions of Hie TS-MOS except optional 
VOX fVOX'4 required forVOXoperatton). 

• Preamplifier for 6 and 10 meter band. 




Compteie service mamsafs at& avmiabte tot afi Henwood 

UB nsceivei s ^na mosi sccssso r<es SpBoUcai ro r<^. f^B fures • 
and prtc&s are subject to chB n ge wtihoui rro ftce orobt\m i to n 

KENWOOD J 

KENWOOD U.S.A. CORPORATION 

2201 E, Dominguez St. Long Beach, CA 90810 
RO. Box 22745. Long Beach. CA 908QV5745